Help with Flash Photography (Olympus FL-600R)

Discussion in 'Help and Feedback' started by tubedriver, Sep 3, 2012.

  1. tubedriver

    tubedriver Mu-43 Regular

    138
    Mar 30, 2012
    Perth, Western Australia
    Shaun
    Hi Everyone,

    Although I have been photographing for a few years now, I have never really used a flash.

    I recently purchased the Olympus FL-600R (to go with my EM-5) and some books to help in understanding flash photography. I have found a book called "Understanding Flash Photography" by Bryan Peterson to be particularly helpful. Although I am finding it hard to translate what he talks about (manual flash techniques, TTL etc) on to this Olympus Flash. He refers to Canon and Nikon flashes and I am finding the Olympus manual that came with the flash particularly frustrating and hard to understand. :confused: 

    Has this area been covered here before or does anyone know of any websites or sources of information that I can refer to?

    Kind Regards
     
  2. Robstar1963

    Robstar1963 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 10, 2011
    Isle of Wight England UK
    Robert (Rob)
    I would also welcome some advice on this subject as it also a bit of a mystery to me too
    All this 1st curtain etc ?
    Rob
     
  3. 0dBm

    0dBm Mu-43 Top Veteran

    859
    Jun 30, 2011
    Western United States
    Start here. It is one of the best resources available.
     
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  4. rhoydotp

    rhoydotp Mu-43 Top Veteran

    609
    Aug 5, 2012
    Toronto, Ont
    rpamparo
    i just finished reading this book for a refresher, too!

    what he is basically saying is:
    Aperture = controls the power based on subject distance
    Shutter = controls how much ambient light is being recorded.

    He goes into some things for consideration like DOF. If you want to maintain a specific DOF, the subject distance might not be practical so a flash with a power-subdivision will help. Or things like increasing the shutter speed to underexpose some of the highlights. IIRC, it's about 3-4 stops that he recommends.

    Having said all that, it really just takes lots of practice and lots of wasted batteries to master flash especially on a non-studio setting.

    Good luck! :) 
     
    • Like Like x 1
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