Help identify lens mounts

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by Crushader, Jan 14, 2014.

  1. Crushader

    Crushader Mu-43 Regular

    62
    Dec 11, 2013
    Melbourne, Australia
    Tham
    I got these 2 lens for a decent price: Formula 5 MC 200mm f3.5 and Konica Hexanon AR 50mm f1.7 (and some 6 filters), but I have problem identify the lens mount on the Formula 5 lens, I know the Hexanon is an AR mount (tell me if I'm wrong). As these two come from the same seller, and the mounts seem to be similar, so I'm wondering if the Formula 5 is also an AR mount?

    Here're a few photos for both lens mounts (excuse the crappy photos):

    Formula 5:





    Hexanon 50mm:





    The mounts seem the same except for the ridge and rod.
     
  2. stratokaster

    stratokaster Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 4, 2011
    Kyiv, Ukraine
    Pavel
    I think this is Konica AR mount.
     
  3. HarryS

    HarryS Mu-43 Top Veteran

    921
    Jun 23, 2012
    Midwest, USA
    Both also look like the same mount to me.
     
  4. chonbhoy

    chonbhoy Mu-43 Veteran

    430
    Apr 23, 2013
    Scottish Highlands
    Formula is MC so it has a M42 mount and Hexanon is AR so it has a AR mount
     
  5. Crushader

    Crushader Mu-43 Regular

    62
    Dec 11, 2013
    Melbourne, Australia
    Tham
    It's not the M42 version, there is no twisting thread mount
     
  6. chonbhoy

    chonbhoy Mu-43 Veteran

    430
    Apr 23, 2013
    Scottish Highlands
    My bad then it must come in different versions? M42 has a bayonet type mount that's all i know.
     
  7. stratokaster

    stratokaster Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 4, 2011
    Kyiv, Ukraine
    Pavel
    MC means 'multicoated', it has nothing to do with lens mounts. I'm pretty sure both lenses are Konica AR mount.
     
  8. Crushader

    Crushader Mu-43 Regular

    62
    Dec 11, 2013
    Melbourne, Australia
    Tham
    Thanks guys! That confirm my assumption, will acquire an AR-m43 adapter to test these 2 out, but I think the Hexanon has horrible fungus problem so maybe won't be of any good use.
     
  9. chonbhoy

    chonbhoy Mu-43 Veteran

    430
    Apr 23, 2013
    Scottish Highlands
    That lens definitely comes in a M42 mount, I googled it so i guess there are different versions, sorry for any confusion. On closer inspection the pin is on the other side from what an M42 is but apart from that they look identical. Does it matter where the pin is located? The reason i ask is without any expertise in the M42 mount these lenses still beg the question why one has a protruding piece of metal on the inner diameter and one doesn't? I'm only thinking of it logically but again i'm no expert just trying to help.
    Edit just to clarify *opposite side from the keyed bayonet partial flange*
     
  10. usayit

    usayit Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    M42 is not a bayonet mount nor breech so you would not see flanges in the mount. It is a simple 42 screw mount so you would see threads instead. Later M42 mount lenses incorporated auto-stop down metering... The pin on those M42 mounts is used to stop down the aperture diaphragm.... As with the famous Spotmatics

    Modern bayonet mounts went through a similar iteration... Many were first designed with aperture preset. Then incorporated auto stop down aperture diaphragm using a lever as the linkage between camera and lens. Then they incorporated metering that was taken with the lens wide open but required the aperture ring position to be communicated to the camera. This was often done through another lever linkage that moved exactly with aperture ring positioning. Of course designs are different from between mount types... but in general. .. There is a mechanical connection that stops down the aperture diaphragm and another that relays aperture ri g positioning for those that support wide open ttl metering.

    Sent from mobile.... excuse my typos
     
  11. HarryS

    HarryS Mu-43 Top Veteran

    921
    Jun 23, 2012
    Midwest, USA
    Here's an M42 next to a Konica AR. An M42 is always a screw thread, but not all screw threads are M42's. However, if you measure the diameter across the threads, it's almost 42 mm. Meanwhile, the AR is a bayonet, and we know it's an AR by the notch in one bayonet flange and its position relative to the arm. Some other mounts also have notches so you have to look at where it is. That's basically how you recognize mounts. You have one you know and if it looks like the unknown lens, then that's all.

    You're asking why the Konica has the metal fence next to the sliding lever that works the aperture? It could be a light shield around the arm to prevent reflections. It could be a guide to help restrain the matching lever in the camera that contacts this arm. I don't know, but it is common for a third party lens maker to eliminate things like this if they figure its not needed.
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Petrochemist

    Petrochemist Mu-43 Top Veteran

    655
    Mar 21, 2013
    N Essex, UK
    Mike
    I think the notched bayonet flange is fairly conclusive.
    From my browsing on different mounts there are only two that have notches, The AR with it near the middle and the Minolta MC/MD where it is right at one end of the flange.
    I've found the following link helpful with lens mounts. Though I'd find a table with actual characteristic measurements / features a great help on being sure.
     
  13. chonbhoy

    chonbhoy Mu-43 Veteran

    430
    Apr 23, 2013
    Scottish Highlands
    Your right I have miss read something on the web it's NOT a M42 mount, for some reason i had it in my head that MC/MD lenses are but I'm mistaken. For anyone reading this that might be interested in old Minolta mounts (The MC could stand for Meter Coupling) it is one iteration of the Minolta SR mount. SR/MC/MD&MD X-600 are all interchangeable i.e. backward compatible.
    Check this wiki on it http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minolta_SR-mount
     
  14. chonbhoy

    chonbhoy Mu-43 Veteran

    430
    Apr 23, 2013
    Scottish Highlands
    You are right I looked at the arm position relative to the notched flange and the MC is in a different position, I'll edit my last post because of mis-information.
     
  15. dwig

    dwig Mu-43 Top Veteran

    624
    Jun 26, 2010
    Key West FL
    Konica may have chosen to use a "fence" rather than a simple pin to avoid reflections, but the main purpose of the "fence" involves the position of the knotch on one end (far side in your pic) which signals the lens' maximum aperture to the body. The OP's 3rd party lens, which is also in Konica AR mount, uses a simple fixed pin for this purpose.
     
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