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Help for first timer Which set up?

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by woollyback, Oct 22, 2015.

  1. woollyback

    woollyback Mu-43 Veteran

    203
    Oct 20, 2015
    Rob
    Hello folks,

    First time post as I recently joined the forum.

    I am looking to jump into the to me unknown world of 4/3 and am looking to decide which outfit to go for ... I think it's between the m1 and m5 mk2 but not really sure what's the best option for me or what features are the most useful in real world shooting.

    I have a load of canon dslr kit that I am sick of lugging around and want a lighter option with great IQ and decent af. I mostly Shoot planes, boats, landscape travel type of stuff so any guidance would be fantastic

    Many thanks for any info

    Rob
     
  2. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    Well let's start what camera you have and lenses (focal lengths).
    How you like to shoot (Auto, Program, Aperture, Shutter, Manual).
    Then Dslr or range finder viewfinder layout. importance of weather sealing?

    There are lots of options out there and while the E-M1 and E-M5 mII are great they may be overkill. I've owned an E-M1 and "downgraded" simply because it was a lot of cash tied up in a body with features I never used. For what I use my m4/3 gear for (everything but my event work) I prefer a simpler setup.
     
  3. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    What camera and lenses do you have now?
     
  4. Lcrunyon

    Lcrunyon Mu-43 Top Veteran

    758
    Jun 4, 2014
    Maryland
    Loren
    This is something I wrote up for a friend who was asking similar advice about Oly OM-D bodies...

    I only have an E-M1 and an E-M5, but I have kept abreast of the goings-on of all of the OM-D models. Several people have recently asked me for buying advice for m4/3, and I have generally been steering them either to the E-M1 or the E-M5 Mk II, depending on the following factors:

    Functionality: There isn’t much difference between the E-M1 and the E-M5 Mk II cameras right now, but with the new firmware update that the E-M1 is getting this month, the number of advantages E-M5 Mk II had over it has diminished to the point that the E-M1 has the edge.
    • Any of these cameras are great for general, street or travel photography. They also have equal capabilities for portraiture. In short, either of these cameras will be able to do whatever you need very well, though perhaps not the best.
    • The E-M5 Mk II’s HI-Rez mode is great for landscape or product photography, and it is the best Olympus camera for video. It’s IBIS is the best in the business.
    • If you do wildlife, sports or action, the best choice is the E-M1, by far. Its better speed and AF is not up to high-end DSLR standards, but it gets close.
    • If you want to use legacy 4/3 glass, the best choice is the E-M1.
    Handling: There seem to be two kinds of m4/3 shooters; those who insist mirrorless and m4/3 must be extremely compact (sacrificing power and features), versus those who want the innovation and functionality of Olympus and mirrorless in a package smaller than DSLRs. I am the latter.
    • If compactness is the most important factor, get an EM-10 MK II. That would be the only reason why I would choose the E-M10 Mk II over the others.
    • Most people prefer the feel of the E-M1. The grip is built-in, and there are more buttons that are more evenly spaced than the E-M5 Mk II. If you tend to use larger lenses, many prefer how they feel on the E-M1, but this isn’t an issue for everyone. Others feel the E-M1 is too big for m4/3. There are yet a few others who feel even the E-M1 needs a little more girth to handle the Olympus Pro lenses, solved by adding an L-Plate or battery grip. I personally agree with the latter.
    • Some people really like how the E-M5 MK II feels, but some have said the buttons are too clustered together, and that while it is easier to grip than the original E-M5, they still prefer adding one of the accessory grips. There is some more customization with the E-M5 Mk II, but some people have complained this makes the camera too complicated at first. I would encourage people who are having trouble getting it set up the way they like it to engage people like me or my fellow forum members at mu-43.com. We can help. Believe me, once any of these cameras are customized the way you like, they become incredibly easy to manipulate.
    • Some people like the fully articulated screen of the E-M5 Mk II, others won’t buy it because of it. It seems to be a pretty divisive issue. All of the other cameras have tilt screens.
    Cost: I always try to buy the best I can afford, and I don’t like to buy used. If you don’t share that philosophy, your assessment might be different than what I outline below...
    • The E-M5 Mk II and the E-M1 are pretty close in cost right now, although the E-M1’s sale prices are generally better.
    • If that price is too high, I would recommend a used Mk II body before I steered people toward the first generation (and discontinued) E-M5 or E-M10. The functional leap of the second generation was significant, and will continue to get better with firmware upgrades.
    • I am a little leery of recommending a used E-M1, because of the quality control issue where some batches of the E-M1’s rear thumb wheel are not always engaging. As a rule, I always question the back story behind any product ending up on the used market, and in this case I’d want a warranty to be safe.
    Conclusion: If you can wait and afford it, get the E-M1 Mk II, which will probably be released some time in 2016. It will be better than any of them. That said, I think the E-M1 is still the best of the existing Oly cameras.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2015
    • Informative Informative x 1
  5. dornblaser

    dornblaser Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 13, 2012
    Chicago-area
    David Dornblaser
    Hi Rob,

    Do you shoot mainly with zooms or primes? If you shoot mainly with zooms, particularly the longer ones consider the E-M1. If you shoot mainly with primes and like a small compact form factor, consider the E-M5 II.
     
  6. Wisertime

    Wisertime Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 6, 2013
    Philly
    Steve
    Sounds like you want telephoto options. Get the EM1. It's also the only model that has fast focus ability with 43 legacy lenses, which you can buy on the cheap now (50-200 f2.8, 150mm f2, etc). I'd say the same if you go for the 40-150 f2.8. The EM1 is awesome.
     
  7. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    LOL you used 150mm f/2.0 and cheap in the same sentence
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  8. Wisertime

    Wisertime Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 6, 2013
    Philly
    Steve
    Cheap compared to what it used to cost I mean. . Cheap enough to be on my radar. ;)I've seen some go for $1200 range on the used market.
     
  9. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Cheap compared to a Canon or Nikon 200mm f2!
     
  10. woollyback

    woollyback Mu-43 Veteran

    203
    Oct 20, 2015
    Rob
    Hello folks,

    Current kit is all canon 5D, 7D 100-400 17-40 70-200 50 24-105

    Shoot almost exclusively Av and TV

    Thanks

    Rob
     
  11. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Are you hoping to replicate this setup to some extent?

    Those are all very fine cameras and Canon's best zooms. You'd probably find the triple "PRO" lineup from olympus to be right up your alley:

    7-14mm F2.8 PRO
    12-40 F2.8 PRO
    40-150mm f2.8 PRO
    If you add the TC to the 40-150mm it will take you out to about 420mm equivalent

    And there are multiple great Normal primes for the system, so that shouldn't be hard to pick.

    If you want some slightly lighter lenses, the Panasonic Zoom trio is a bit lighter:

    7-14mm f4
    12-35mm f2.8 X
    35-100mm f2.8 X

    And of course you can mix and match.

    To be honest, there is nothing quite as good and long for the system as the 100-400 on a 7D. We have the 100-300 and the 75-300, but they are more consumer grade lenses and aren't quite up to par. There is a 100-400 announced from Panasonic, but it's probably next year. You may consider keeping the 7D and the Canon 100-400 until that is announced. If you had an E-M1, you could buy a used old 4/3 SLR 50-200 SWD lens, but it's not any smaller or lighter than the 100-400, really, so might not be worth swapping.

    P.S. the reason you need an E-M1 for adapted 4/3 SLR lenses is that the E-M1 is the only current m4/3 body with phase detect AF and that's what the SLR lenses need to focus fast.
     
  12. budeny

    budeny Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 4, 2014
    Boulder, CO
    yeah, and that "bit" is 831 grams or slightly 46% less than Olympus triple "PRO" lineup (1796 g vs. 965 g) :D

    I would suggest EM1 (because I have it and like it) and 12-35 or 12-40 lens for starters.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2015
  13. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    With the E-M1 and a metabone adapter you should be able to use the Canon lenses with full AF. Advantages of E-M5 are high-res mode (tripod and static subjects only) and smaller size.

    o_O
     
  14. woollyback

    woollyback Mu-43 Veteran

    203
    Oct 20, 2015
    Rob
    Wow so much info thank you

    So with a metabones adaptor the 100-400 canon ef lens will autofocus on an m1 and become a 200-800 fov lens?
     
  15. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    Yes it will
     
  16. Lcrunyon

    Lcrunyon Mu-43 Top Veteran

    758
    Jun 4, 2014
    Maryland
    Loren
    Be sure to get the right one. I looked at all of them on B&H (because that sounds interesting), and only one of them says it supports autofocus.

    As for the final equivalent focal length, that also depends on which adapter you get. The regular adapters (normal or smart) will get you 200-800mm. The more expensive speed boosters will get you x.64 or x.71 that focal length, with an increase in +1 or +1.3 f-stop of light, respectively. They would be best if you wanted to go wide and fast, IMO.

    The "T Smart Adapter for Canon EF or Canon EF-S Mount Lens to Select Micro Four Thirds-Mount Cameras" is the one you want. It will give you both the full focal length plus AF. No aperture increase, though.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2015
  17. techsplorer

    techsplorer Mu-43 Regular

    84
    May 8, 2015
    Townsend, TN
    Rodion "Rod" Molina
    I have a similar philosophy, preferring to purchase any significant consumer electronics, like camera bodies and computers, new when possible (and affordable) to gain the benefits of warranties, etc. (also the enjoyment of unboxing something new)

    When it comes to lenses and accessories though, I've managed to quickly build up a respectable lens collection by going the used route either via the buy & sell forum here or on fredmiranda.com (avoiding eBay as much as possible) this route has saved me a LOT of money in the process too. Most of the lenses I've purchased used have been practically new anyway. At least I've been lucky so far.

    So I'd definitely recommend considering the used lens/accessory route to allow for the best system body you can afford.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2015
  18. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Yes, but the adapter costs almost as much as your 7D would sell for and have worse AF performance. I'd just keep the 7D around if you intend to keep that lens.

    Yes definitely, but it's not quite an apples to apples comparison. The 7-14 is a stop slower and the 40-150mm has 50% more zoom reach.
     
  19. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    Yes, but the Pana Leica 100-400 or any good long tele costs much more then the metabones adapter. It depends on how you want to handle the transition.

    I've yet to see any review of the latest firmware that supports E-M1 PDAF but C-AF is already in the Limitations:

    http://www.metabones.com/article/of/Firmware_update_version_1.8
     
  20. DoofClenas

    DoofClenas Who needs a Mirror!

    941
    Nov 9, 2012
    Traverse City, MI
    Clint
    The price difference is only $100 right now between the two cameras. Em1 for 999 new with the looming firmware release is a great deal. Or scrounge around for a used camera in the 600-700 range. Can you find a store to hold them in your hands?