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Help! first timer! Fujifilm x100 vs nex-5N vs Canon 600D

Discussion in 'This or That? (MFT only)' started by newbietophotos, Jan 26, 2012.

  1. newbietophotos

    newbietophotos New to Mu-43

    5
    Jan 26, 2012
    Hi, I could really use your advice. Im a complete beginner to the art of photography and I am very keen to get into it. Ive only owned a compact camera till now and want to get a camera I can take photography seriously with. I was thinking of buying either a Sony Nex-5N or Fujifilm x100 or a Canon 600D/T3I. What would you recommend? I would love to get involved with landscape and food photography but also to be able to take it while travelling. your advice would be appreciated.
    Cheers.
     
  2. ripleys baby

    ripleys baby Straw clutcher

    609
    Aug 10, 2011
    Pretty sure you may be in the wrong place here, as none of those cameras is a 4/3 camera .:smile:

    But as all are a good bunch here, i suspect you will get help.
    Why no 4/3 cameras on that list ?:frown:
     
  3. Iansky

    Iansky Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 26, 2009
    The Cotswolds, UK
    You would be better off adressing this in the serious compacts forum that covers the X100 and other formats - this site is Mu4/3.

    Here is the link:
    SeriousCompacts.com
     
  4. newbietophotos

    newbietophotos New to Mu-43

    5
    Jan 26, 2012
    sorry guys. I am also considering E-P3 or E-PL3 or Panasonic DMC-GX1, but all of these cameras seem to be in the not a simple P&S but not a DSLR either category. Any suggestions would be helpful. :)
     
  5. nrowensby

    nrowensby Mu-43 Regular

    89
    Jan 25, 2012
    Columbia, SC
    600D is deinitely a DSLR.... :wink:
     
  6. demiro

    demiro Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Nov 7, 2010
    Have you researched the basic specs and do you understand them? For example, the X100 is a fixed lens camera with one focal length (does not zoom). It is not what I would expect someone to choose as their first "serious" camera after shooting with point and shoots previously.

    The NEX or the :43: options or the Canon DSLRs are all interchangeable lens cameras, which allow you to choose a zoom like on your point and shoot or a prime lens with fixed focal length like on the X100.

    So, some early questions: Do you want to end up with a camera body and numerous lenses, or is a fixed lens camera better for you? Multiple lenses give you maximum versatility, as you can have the best lens for each job, but with obvious tradeoffs to portability and cost.

    Speaking of cost, what kind of budget do you have?
     
  7. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    The first question is absolutely completely and positively what do you want to do with the camera.

    You mention landscape, food photography and travel. Can I ask a little more detail on the first two (landscape and food)?

    All of these cameras can do what you are talking about. They are all great cameras, though I'd say the NEX may be the weakest of the group. Here are some of my personal thoughts, given "landscape, food and travel"

    • X100 -- food and landscape doesn't tend to move, so the slightly slower AF of the X100 won't matter. It's compact and high quality, so good for travel. It's a fixed focal length, which on one hand is nice to learn to shoot one focal length, but on the other hand you might find is very limiting. It costs a fair amount, too.
    • NEX 5 -- good compact size, good tilt screen, and clean high ISO, but the lenses as of current are very, very limited unless you want to go manual focus, which you could do. It's not cheap if you want a viewfinder. The camera itself is OK price, but the viewfinder is awful expensive. Auto focus is a tad slower than the m43 cameras.
    • 600D -- solid all-around first DSLR. Will shoot everything you want, and has good output. The strength of the 600D over the other cameras on this list is the speed of DSLR auto focus for moving subjects. If you aren't shooting moving subjects, then you are taking a penalty in size. Also, shooting with the LCD is a pain on the 600D, so your ability to shoot at odd angles can be limited and/or frustrating. But if you need moving subjects, this is the best one in this group. Auto focus is fast and good at tracking.
    • EP3 -- good camera, and the touch to shoot LCD helps with moving subjects. m43 has excellent lens choices, too. You can add an optional viewfinder, and it's pretty compact. But, there is a rumored new Olympus camera coming out, and the value of the EP3 may drop pretty radically soon (it's kind of expensive right now as is). I would be tempted to wait a bit before buying. February 8th is the rumored announcement date for the new camera. Auto focus is very fast.
    • EPL3 -- good pocketable camera. Good tilt screen. I got the EPM1 because of cost and because I didn't need the tilty screen, though some EPM1s have an issue with IS, that doesn't seem to be the case with the EPL3. Again, m43 has great lenses. Auto focus is very fast.
    • GX1 -- I favor the Olympus bodies, but the GX1 is getting good reviews, and it's direct predecessor -- the GF1 -- was praised by all who used it. Should have slightly better ISO than the current Olympuses, and like all m43 has great lenses. I understand the autofocus is good (haven't tried it myself)

    Out of the ones you mentioned, I would suggest:

    if you need action shots in motion and you don't care about size, then the 600D, but this doesn't sound like your needs, so I'd vote for:

    X100 if you like only shooting at one focal length, and you don't mind slightly slower auto focus.

    EPL3 or GX1 if you need lens options. Find a way to try them out first. If you really want to step up to a top-line m43 camera, and you want something a bit bigger, then wait for the OM-D announcement on February 8th. You might like that camera and EP3 prices are likely to drop.
     
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  8. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    Oh! One other thought maybe for you, as you step up from point and shoot -- a Canon G1X (not to be confused with the Panasonic GX1)

    GX1 (Panasonic) -- micro four thirds camera with interchangeable lenses
    G1X (Canon) -- has a sensor similar to micro four thirds, but has a non-detachable zoom lens. This camera would give you the look and feel of a point and shoot, but MUCH better image quality, and you'd still get some advanced controls.

    See Canon PowerShot G1 X Preview: 1. Introduction: Digital Photography Review
     
  9. newbietophotos

    newbietophotos New to Mu-43

    5
    Jan 26, 2012


    thank you for a quickly reply firstly. I initially thought the 600D would be the best option to get into photography but after contemplating it a compact system with a DSLR like IQ and advanced controls sounded bit more tempting as I read more and more reviews. I am very inexperienced at photography so I cant say exactly what would suite me and what kind of style I enjoy the most but I have been obsessing over it (photography) for the last 6 months. Since I am just starting out I would imagine a versatile kit would be better so I can experiment with different styles and find what I like. Currently I mostly take my camera out when im travelling and what compelled me to get into photography is that I want to be able to capture the emotion of the landscapes and experiences I see (This would include foods). I like to take close up shots of foods to get the fine details but also would like to be able to capture the atmosphere of the restaurant (indoors and outdoors). Right now the x100 is tugging at my heart so much, its become one of those things that has become a need to have but I'm not sure if it is the best option for me.

    Ive done alot of research on each system and you've summed it up nicely :) but reading about it is only so much. Im going to the shops this weekend to check them out. Being a newbie I really do appreciate everyone's 2cents.
     
  10. fredlong

    fredlong Just this guy...

    Apr 18, 2011
    Massachusetts USA
    Fred
    The Fuji X100 with it's wide angle lens may not be so good for food photography where you want to be up close and personal.

    Since you're considering an slr, you might want to take a good look at the Panasonic G3 as well. The G3, EPL3 or GX1 with the kit zoom will do fine with food and the wide end is decent for landscape. You could also add the Olympus 9-18 wide zoom to any of them and still be in the price range of the Fuji.

    I don't think the Sony has a super wide option at this time. Anyone else, please correct me if I'm wrong.

    Fred
     
  11. newbietophotos

    newbietophotos New to Mu-43

    5
    Jan 26, 2012
    Hi, thanks for your reply. Ive done a lot of research for the last 6 months, I understand its a prime lens but I was considering I would get the canon 50mm f1.8 II as my first lens if I went with the 600D so it doesn't bother me. Only thing is that its not interchangeable. Its the only fixed lens camera I am considering due to its high IQ and its handsome looks. its really sexy :D I want a good balance between versatility and portability, and that is what has put me off DSLRs so far. But I want to look at this as a future investment not something that I want to change in the next 3 years. My budget is around $1300 USD.
     
  12. nrowensby

    nrowensby Mu-43 Regular

    89
    Jan 25, 2012
    Columbia, SC
    3 Years is a long time in any type of technology field... and gear lust runs rampid in photography.
     
  13. newbietophotos

    newbietophotos New to Mu-43

    5
    Jan 26, 2012
    so should I expect to be changing gears within the next 3 years? thats why getting a Cheap DSLR and investing in good lens made economical sense. but the idea of portability in of the compacts are still tempting.
     
  14. gsciorio

    gsciorio Mu-43 Top Veteran

    636
    Dec 29, 2011
    Miami, FL
    If you're new to the "art" then focus on the art. If you use your camera as a crutch you'll slow your artistic development. Just get a camera and shoot.
     
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  15. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    The only cameras that don't get upgraded within 3 years are pro-grade models. Consumer-grade models normally have a new upgrade in the next 6 months. That of course doesn't mean that you should need that upgrade or that you should be unhappy with your current camera just because something new came out.

    Some of the models which I would consider long-term worthy, that will hold their intrinsic value for a long time, would be the Olympus E-PL2, Panasonic GX-1, Olympus E-PM1, Panasonic GH2, and Fuji X100. Cameras like the Sony NEX-5N and Canon 600D are obsolete before they hit the door just like buying a cheap computer, as they have no special competitive qualities.
     
  16. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    If you hang around forum boards, you will soon be changing your gear every 3 -6 months :)

    Buy a camera and go out and shoot. Don't worry about changing gear.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    I strongly suggest not the x100. If you are coming from P&S you will sorely miss the zoom. I suggest you take a little trip with your present camera and pre-select a zoom range which is slightly wide (the x100 is 35mm in 35mm film). And shoot the entire experience at this one pre-selected zoom.

    It would be a lot of work for an experienced and skilled photographer. Most every shot would require a lot of thought to capture the image you see within the limitations of a single focal length. This would be challenging and fun for a professional ... but for the neophyte awfully frustrating.

    On the flip side of the coin, a fixed, non-zoom lens is the best way to learn photography and hone your vision to the eye of the camera.

    The 600D will deliver all the camera you need and then some. But to attain the images promised, you will be saddled with a bulky camera and lens system. Some people accept this and others shy away. You have to make that call if your photography is worth a few extra pounds and a larger camera bag.

    The M4/3 cameras will deliver one hell of a punch in a smaller compact size. The M4/3 camera size is so convenient that most people are more willing to grab the M4/3 as they leave the door (not so with a dSLR). I have found the M4/3 to have Image Quality (IQ) equal to my FF dSLRs, up to an 8x10 and under ISO 800. This is with the last generation sensor, the newer sensors (ala GX1) are even better.

    Again, if you are willing to accept the frustrations of a fixed lens, non-zoom camera, the X100 is a great camera. If you desire a camera that will grow and expand as your photographic skills increase then either a M4/3 or dSLR.

    M4/3 smaller size is a big plus over a dSLR. The dSLR has a larger system behind it (lenses, et al) and is better at capturing action photos (i.e. sports) and with a larger sensor it can deliver larger images with greater detail and less noise.

    Good Luck and Good Shooting,
    Gary
     
  18. demiro

    demiro Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Nov 7, 2010
    newbie, I will suggest something here even though I am not a huge fan of the camera myself: The Canon G12. It is a good, high-end point and shoot camera. Lots of manual controls and can shoot RAW. It gives you the opportunity to be more of a photographer and less of a button pusher. It will serve you well for shooting landscapes and food, and is a nice travel camera with decent zoom and modest, although not pocketable, size.

    I think the real upside of the G12 is that you can pick one up used for <$400, use it for six months or so, and then probably have a much better idea which way to go when you step to a "system camera". You'll also be able to resell the G12 for likely only a small loss, and put that cash back in to your next purchase.

    In that same arena the Fuji X10 is an option. Still selling for $500+ used I believe, but does many of the same things as the G12 and gives you the look and feel of the X100. It does have a real issue handling bright highlights (like sun reflection off water or cars) though, so keep that in mind.
     
  19. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    That's an upside? For <$400 you can already get a system camera to begin with! Even a brand-new system camera like the E-PM1 which has all the functionality, speed, and image quality of a modern DSLR. If you get an older body, you can probably get the body AND a fast lens for that much. Either option will blow the G12 out of the water. Plus an investment in a system camera, particularly in the lenses and accessories, will hold its value much better than a point-and-shoot. Lenses and accessories hardly even lose their value, only bodies do. Not only do they hold their value if you sell them, but if you don't sell them they remain current and relevant. I still use lenses as old as 1953, and consistently use lenses from the 70's - 80's, and the early part of the millennium. When a point-and-shoot depreciates, the entire unit goes down the drain. In fact, the G12 is already "obsolete".

    If you're going to learn how to use a "real" camera, you may as well start right. You save nothing on a high-end point-and-shoot unless that's as far as you plan on going. The current prices of Micro Four-Thirds cameras are ridiculously cheap for what they give you. High-end point-and-shoots like the G12 are ridiculously overpriced for what they offer. Sorry, but I just don't see that as a sound investment.
     
  20. M4/3

    M4/3 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    713
    Sep 24, 2011
    newbietophotos, a year ago I was in your shoes (experienced with only point and shoots) and I ended up spending $1100.00 for a 600D system thinking it would provide me with a huge leap in landscape image quality. I was dead wrong. The detail resolution was no better and I found the Canon colors unappealing as compared to the colors my Olympus point and shoots had delivered. I did some online research and discovered most of the Olympus Pen cameras had what I was looking for: sharp resolution of landscape details and rich looking yet realistic colors. So if I were you I'd try out an Olympus E-PM1 (only $400-450) and then in 6 months to a year, sell it on ebay for $300 if you long for something with more advanced features and get the upcoming Olympus OM-D or Panasonic's replacement for its current GH2