1. Reminder: Please use our affiliate links for holiday shopping!

Halo effect with Canon FD 50mm 1.4

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by muzee, Jul 18, 2011.

  1. muzee

    muzee Mu-43 Regular

    79
    May 10, 2011
    I just picked up one of these lens from Henry's (listed at ~$100, but got it for $20!!), and it looks good so far. However I'm getting a "halo" effect (purple fringing?) around the objects in my pictures. Is this normal? Any ideas how to correct it? What am I doing wrong?

    Thanks!
    sample images:
    P7143153.

    P7143130.JPG
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. theunartist

    theunartist Mu-43 Regular

    66
    Jul 5, 2011
    Baltimore, MD
    I think that's pretty normal in the lighting conditions I see in your photos. I would try 2 things, use the highest ISO and stop the lens down a bit. You do have some Purple Fringing and stopping down the lens will also help. I would also recommend using a lens hood when possible, it looks like the light source is pretty close to being in front of lens, must be careful here, this can easily give you a "washed out" look. You images are a little overexposed, I would try to "under" expose (whatever meter reading your getting) by 2/3 to 1 stop, it'll add some contrast and save some of the highlights.

    You can probably "save" the images in PPing...
     
  3. muzee

    muzee Mu-43 Regular

    79
    May 10, 2011
    Thanks for responding! Will try your suggestions and see how they come out.

    Quick questions:
    Most of my shots were taken between 2.8 - 4.0 ... what value would you suggest for the stopping down then?
    Highest ISO? ... I would imagine a higher ISO would make the sensor more sensitive to light. Don't quite understand this one ( I'm a total noob):)
     
  4. theunartist

    theunartist Mu-43 Regular

    66
    Jul 5, 2011
    Baltimore, MD
    My bad... I meant the lowest ISO... I was out taking some pics this past weekend in similar lighting conditions and found I could not use anything below f7-f8...

    The more overexposed you get the more you will see the "halo" and "washed out" look. Your 1st photo is very overexposed and your 2nd photo is pretty close. But if you look at left shoulder, it's way overexposed (aka blown highlights), you'll need to learn how to find the middle ground when exposing.

    In other word, the only way to learn is to practice, and try a few different settings... try a different mode, or metering pattern, but just try something different if you're not happy with the results and you'll be surprised how much better you get.
     
  5. pxpaulx

    pxpaulx Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 19, 2010
    Midwest
    Paul
    I would also suggest in such a bright scene to dial about 2/3 under exposure.
     
  6. theunartist

    theunartist Mu-43 Regular

    66
    Jul 5, 2011
    Baltimore, MD
    You should Google the term "lens flare" and look at the images and you'll notice a few similar to yours.

    Good explanation of lens flare: How to Eliminate Lens Flare
     
  7. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    That's not lens flare.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    It can also be driven by legacy lenses in general. Adapters that have shiny internal surfaces can aggravate this, and also the fact that the rear element in legacy lenses is not coated, because the old sensor (film) was a lot less shiny than the new sensor (silicon). Most legacy lenses look soft wide open in these conditions.

    Which is another reason why the creation of native lenses (PL25/1.4, mZD45/1.8) is so important. Many legacy lenses are difficult to use wide open because they weren't designed for digital.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    Use the highest ISO you need in order to counter-act stopping down I think is what was meant. But in those conditions with that kind of light, you don't need to boost your ISO unless you need to stop fast motion. Just maintain 1/100 shutter speed, and you should be OK (again, for relatively static subjects).

    From 1.4, 2.8 and 4.0 should do it. Are you certain that was the f/stop you used?

    Another issue with these old lenses is the adapter. Is the inside of your adapter matte black, or is it shiny? If it's not matte, then these adapters actually let a lot of light bounce around inside, which can impact your photo.

    Of course, a $20 lens could also have it's own issues!

    How does it shoot indoors in more moderate light? Any samples?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. muzee

    muzee Mu-43 Regular

    79
    May 10, 2011
    I tried a few more shots just now - outside in the bright sunshine with the aperture all the way down to f/22. I'm seeing that the shots taken close up have less (not quite visible) purple fringes than the ones taken at a distance (halo effect quite pronounced).

    Outdoor samples:
    Close up - ISO 200 (lowest for E-PL2), 1/4000 sec, 0 EV, f/22:
    P7183400.JPG

    Far away - ISO 200, 1/4000 sec, -3 EV, f/22:
    P7183406.JPG

    Indoor samples:
    ISO 200, 1/30 sec, -7 EV, f/4:
    P7183409.JPG

    ISO 200, 1/60 sec, -7 EV, f/4:



    Taken earlier: ISO 200, 1/500 sec, +3 EV, f ??:
    P7132952.JPG
     
  11. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    I don't see much on the indoor samples.

    I saw this with my Takumar and Rokkor lenses, usually white colors in bright light. DO you think your indoor shots show less of this (it seems that way to me).
     
  12. muzee

    muzee Mu-43 Regular

    79
    May 10, 2011
    No .. the indoor shots look way better :) I'm guessing the outdoor light is too much for the lens ... oh well, for $20, I can't complain, right? I just wanted to make sure it wasn't just user error :)
     
  13. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    This was my experience with legacy lenses. Even my beloved OM 50mm 2.0 macro still shows this "ghosting" at 2.0, mostly gone at 2.8 and completely gone at 4.0. I'm hoping the new slew of native lenses will make this a non-issue (though for a price! $20 for an indoor wonderful lens isn't too bad!)
     
  14. theunartist

    theunartist Mu-43 Regular

    66
    Jul 5, 2011
    Baltimore, MD
    Your lens IMHO, will work fine as soon as you get to know how it best works...

    The "halo/purple fringing" effect will happen to many lenses when used in very bright high contrast situations. These things can be avoided by using a hood and/or making sure light source is coming from behind the lens and not from front or side and proper exposure. Many professional photographers would not attempt to take a picture in harsh lighting, it's simply considered bad lighting. They will often pick a shaded area, wait till later in the day,when the light becomes less oppressive.

    I downloaded one of you images and quickly worked on it using Faststone, I think the results are decent and could be further improved. All digital images, whether JPEG or RAW will need some or a lot of Post Processing. Faststone and Picasa are simple and free.

    test1FS.

    The last piece of advice, if you'd like to take better pics in these lighting conditions, you might want to consider using a quality polarizer filter. When used properly, they will improve contrast and color 100% and allow you to take photos you thought would be nearly impossible...
     
  15. muzee

    muzee Mu-43 Regular

    79
    May 10, 2011
    Thanks again for the. I really should spend some more time post processing. Q: how would you fix that halo effect in Picasa? And I'm definitely going to look into the polarized filter.

    PS: nice "theunartist.com" signature on my image :)
     
  16. theunartist

    theunartist Mu-43 Regular

    66
    Jul 5, 2011
    Baltimore, MD
    That sig was automatic, forgot to turn off... :eek:

    I took the same image and just used the "Feeling Lucky" button, improved it somewhat but not enough. If you're on Windows/PC computer try FastStone Image Viewer, Screen Capture, Photo Resizer ... - that's what I used on image, it's just as simple as Picasa but will also allow you to do more tinkering, easy learning curve and a really good software... unless I plan to print something, I've been using Faststone and JPEG's for at least 95% on of all my images on Picasa Albums and Flickr

    I pretty much only use legacy lenses on my Pentax as well as on my Panasonic. They are lovely to use manually, colors are rich and contrasty. They almost all have to be used with hoods, which I do. The polarizer will allow you to take photos in severe lighting, glare and reflections by cutting out some light, etc... I used one recently at the Delaware shore and was very very happy with the results!
     
  17. If I ever get a halo effect from my Canon (new FD) 50/1.4 I know that I've forgotten to twist the lock ring on the adapter and it's shooting wide-open. At f/2 or smaller the problem disappears. Using a suitable lens hood also solves a lot of contrast, flare and overexposure issues with full-frame SLR lenses.
     
  18. muzee

    muzee Mu-43 Regular

    79
    May 10, 2011
    okay .. gotta remember this tip. I do recall feeling the adapter a bit loose.
     
  19. compositor20

    compositor20 Mu-43 Regular

    32
    Oct 21, 2010
    the adapter gets loose and sometimes you are at f1.4 those ar a mix of spherical aberrations (halos) with lack of contrast from the sensor

    i use an internal cardboard buffle or baffle with 18mm diameter in the adapter and use a canon lens hood bt-52B its important to be the B version or big version with 6cm hood it makes pictures much contrastier and at f2 it starts to look more modern and at f2.8 its outstandingly sharp and free of aberrations