GPU vs Intel QSV

D7k1

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Video process is complex and rendering can take a Dog's life to do. Yesterday I spent some time trying to identify what was the best way for me to render for the various things I do.

I use Vegas 15 (If Adobe had a $9.95 Premier Option might have gone that way when I upgraded from Movie studio). My video setup uses a MSI motherboard, Intel i7700 4200 with HD640 on chip, an AMD RX480 8 gig video card, 7200 HD for stock and an 512 SSD for rendering.

Here is a link to the tests I did.

Basically what I found is if you only do social media and have a NLE that uses QSV you can save your sell some dollars (like about $300) if you use QSV to render.
 
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DanS

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What i do is render out of my NLE to DNxHR (I'm on windows), and then use ffmpeg to create the final deliverable. If you have a newer Nvidia GPU, ffmpeg will leverage the api to encode and decode, and it will obliterate a cpu when it comes to encoding.
 

DanS

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I wish you guys spoke English.
lol,


NLE stands for Non Linear Editor, or in other words what you edit your video footage in.

DNxHR is a video codec - It's what is commonly referred to as an intermediate codec. its very lightly compressed so its easy to work with on older machines, but it has a huge bit-rate so its not something you are going to upload to YouTube.

ffmpeg is an opensource command prompt audio video editing application.
FFmpeg



I don't know why, but the video section of the forum never gets much traffic, even though m43 is probably the best format for enthusiasts to shoot video with.
 

D7k1

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But QSV is a on chip separate processor, from Wikipedia, "
Intel Quick Sync Video is Intel's brand for its dedicated video encoding and decoding hardware core. Quick Sync was introduced with the Sandy Bridge CPU microarchitecture on 9 January 2011, and has been found on the die of Intel products ever since.

The name "Quick Sync" refers to the use case of quickly transcoding ("syncing") a video from, for example, a DVD or Blu-ray Disc to a format appropriate to, for example, a smartphone.

Unlike video encoding on a CPU or a general-purpose GPU, Quick Sync is a dedicated hardware core on the processor die. This allows for a much more power efficient video processing. " Greatly enhance in the Kabylake intel chips.

If you have the right codec it will blow past every thing but the fasted dedicated Video GPU cards especially when you have lots of FX's applied, rendering and realtime viewing from the timeline are the true benefits. Take a strait file with nothing done and it renders like lightening, but when you add lots of timeline elements like grading, music, FX effects and try to render that when the full power of a GPU operation happens. Often taking only between 25 and 50% of the time a CPU render only would take. Vegas Magix ACC/ACV also taps into the Nvidia GPU now (as well as Intel QSV and AMD Open GL) for incredible speeds). However for me nothing is as important as ProRes and I can render the 4K file which has lot of segements, FX, titles, and other stuff in 1:20m from thee 40 second project - that is amazing considering that is 100 mb file to a 150 mb file in 4K.
 

DanS

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Unlike video encoding on a CPU or a general-purpose GPU, Quick Sync is a dedicated hardware core on the processor die. This allows for a much more power efficient video processing. " Greatly enhance in the Kabylake intel chips.
This is what the modern Nvida GPUs have as well, only they are a lot more powerful, as they have a lot of processing power built in. In monitoring software you can see that they run at a different frequency than the main gpu, and have separate load and bus metrics as well.

NVIDIA VIDEO CODEC SDK
NVIDIA GPUs - beginning with the Kepler generation - contain a hardware-based encoder (referred to as NVENC) which provides fully-accelerated hardware-based video encoding and is independent of graphics performance. With complete encoding (which is computationally complex) offloaded to NVENC, the graphics engine and the CPU are free for other operations. For example, in a game recording scenario, encoding being completely offloaded to NVENC makes the graphics engine bandwidth fully available for game rendering.

for example on my 6850k and GTX 1070 I can trans code and downsample 4k 30p footage from my G7 or GH5 to DNxHR at rougly 180fps (6x). Neither the gpu or cpu load ever goes above about 15%.
 
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