Got the GF1, but something is sort of bugging me.

banana101

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Hello! I got the GF1 today and thought I would take a few test shots sat in my room. At first the pictures didn't have this strange little blurry thing on it:

View attachment 159031

but then after about 10 minutes:

View attachment 159032

This blurry, blotchy little thing seems to have appeared! I bought a lens/filter cleaning pen when I got the camera earlier on (the assistant reccommended it) and I've even used that on the filter but it doesn't seem to have helped!!

Should I take the filter off (he put it on for me in the shop) and try cleaning the actual lens or is the problem something else? :(
 

MichaelShea

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The slight drawback with such a filter is that it will tend to pick up reflections. I have one on all the time and the advantages outweigh the disadvantages, but indoors it isn't doing anything that will help you, apart from protecting the lens from dust. Bear in mind that the sun doesn't get up high at this time of year and so the direction of light is often a problem. I very much doubt that there's anything to worry about with the lens itself, but get it out in some daylight and test it again.
 

banana101

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Ohhhh so it's basically just the filter! I'm fine with that! I was worried it was something perhaps actually wrong with the lens or camera! Thanks so much for the info :)
 

~tc~

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The chances of this happening are directly (inverseley) proportionate to filter price.

If he included it for "free" with the camera, you can bet it's a piece of garbage.
 

banana101

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Nope, he charged me 10£, which is still probably quite cheap? I'm not sure! There were loads with different price ranges but he said this was the one that would fit this camera :\
 

travisennis

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JohnMetsn said:
I'm using a filter from B+W MRC and didn't notice any reflections yet...
I am using the same filter and I've never noticed reflections either. Before that I did use a Tiffen filter and saw reflections all the time. It's worth the extra money to get a quality filter.
 

shoturtle

 
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did you get a multicoated filter, or a cheapo one. A multicoated one will prevent some of the ghosting effect. Or just shoot without a filter on. There is really now optical need for a filter. If you feel the need to protect the front of the lens, get a good multicoated one like a BW MRC or a tiffen HT, or hoya SMC HD pro.
 

banana101

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I didn't purposely buy a cheap filter, it's just the one that he offered, he just picked it up and popped it onto the camera saying it's the last one they have left that fits the camera!

It's a 'kenko UV filter'
 

shoturtle

 
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which one? if it is not multi coated and is plane glass or single coated. You really need to be careful when shooting toward a bright spot, as it can flare and or ghost.
 
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The lens filter is the camera shop equivalent of "Do you want fries with that?". Kenko filters can be hit and miss. I think they are a Hoya affiliated brand.
 

Iconindustries

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I can vouch for the hoya smc hd filters. I have two of them and they haven't given any trouble. I'm very pleased with how they don't attract dust like the cheaper brands.

A filter is a very good safeguard to help protect you lens. As another member has suggested take it off when you could have problems with interference ( like at night ect)
 

mauve

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I know I'm mostly alone of that opinion on this matter, but I never use a skylight filter; modern lenses are beautifully multi-coated, computed for excellence when they are used alone, why on earth would I want to degrade the image quality by putting an aftermarket unknown piece of glass at the end, however good some brands may be ? Even the top of the line filter will induce refraction and diffraction troubles.

To protect the lens, a rigid hood will take care of most accidents unless the camera falls straight on a spike. It will be less expensive to replace, and offers better protection against sun stray rays. When not taking pictures, use a cap. Never put a finger on glass, and gently wipe any dust spec with a soft cloth. Don't breath on it before wiping. Your lens will be good for years if you don't smoke around.

Some filters (polarizers for instance) are useful, but not skylights.

My opinion.
 

shoturtle

 
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the bad thing is there is not that many hood options out there. And none can bayonet mount to the 20 1.7. So it add more to put the camera way at times.

I personally do not use a UV filter. Just a haze filter for the beach or harsh environment for the add protection for dust, sand and sea spray. And I shoot with it off most of the time. So there is a time and place for them.
 

noelh

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Regarding filters have assumed you get what you pay for up to some point of diminishing returns. Since the 35mm SLR days have stuck with B+W for lens mounted filters. So far, no issues. B+W F-Pro on the Lumix 14-45mm & 45-200mm.
 

banana101

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I know I'm mostly alone of that opinion on this matter, but I never use a skylight filter; modern lenses are beautifully multi-coated, computed for excellence when they are used alone, why on earth would I want to degrade the image quality by putting an aftermarket unknown piece of glass at the end, however good some brands may be ? Even the top of the line filter will induce refraction and diffraction troubles.

To protect the lens, a rigid hood will take care of most accidents unless the camera falls straight on a spike. It will be less expensive to replace, and offers better protection against sun stray rays. When not taking pictures, use a cap. Never put a finger on glass, and gently wipe any dust spec with a soft cloth. Don't breath on it before wiping. Your lens will be good for years if you don't smoke around.

Some filters (polarizers for instance) are useful, but not skylights.

My opinion.
really?! they also sold me this: CameraWorld LensPen | Online Camera Retailers with Stores in London and Chelmsford - CameraWorld.co.uk and on the back it says if the smudge on the lens/filter won't go then breath a mist onto it and then wipe again..
 

shoturtle

 
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lens pens work. I use them on my lenses. But on very stubborn grease, you really want to use a liquid to soften it up before removing it.
 
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