Got my RRS L plate for E=M1 mkII

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by moonhawk, Mar 7, 2017.

  1. moonhawk

    moonhawk Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    309
    Feb 12, 2016
    Dave Cherry
    I pre-ordered back in January when I got my mkII. There has been speculation about how it will hasndle the pivoting LCD. I will try to explain and illustrate.

    The RRS BOEM-1-2L is a two piece L plate, as we knew it would be. But, thhis unit attaches with a liding dovetail, that can be adjusted over a spread of about 3/4". So, you can open it out to allow more room for the LCD, or keep it up against the body. These two shots illustrate the range of adjustment.
    L5.


    L6.

    The next two shots show how far you can open the LCD with the L plate attached in both positions:
    L1.
    L2.

    As you can see, neither position allows you to fully open the LCD, but for me, it's good enough. YMMV, of course.

    There is one other new and unique feature of the BOEM1-2-L That deserves note: There is the facility to store a hex wrench in the bottom cavity of the L plate, secured by magnets, as follows: In this first image, you can see the two magnets. L3.

    And here is the same shot with the hex key attached:
    L4.

    So, is it worth the money? I'm keeping mine, but only you can decide for yourself. I will leave mine attached, minus the L portion, as I like how it makes the grip taller. Feels really good in the hand.

    Hope this helps someone out there....
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2017
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  2. alex g

    alex g Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Mar 30, 2016
    New York / Bath
    Nice review, thanks!

    I wonder how the IBIS and the electromagnetic shutter mechanism feel about the presence of the magnets? I guess we must assume that RRS already thought about that, and that the magnets aren't powerful enough to cause problems. :)
     
  3. DoofClenas

    DoofClenas Who needs a Mirror! Subscribing Member

    Nov 9, 2012
    Traverse City, MI
    Clint
    Did they send you a shipping notice or did it just show up. I preordered too when it first came available.
     
  4. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    It doesn't affect it. The RRS plate for the E-M5 II has magnets to hold the allen key and it works fine.

    Source: I own an E-M5 II & RRS baseplate.
     
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  5. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    Thanks for the images and your thoughts @moonhawk@moonhawk . One thing to note is that this isn't the first m43 RRS base plate to have magnets in the base to store the allen key, the E-M5 II's plate has these as well.

    That's kind of a bummer about the L-plate portion. Also, I don't understand why they made it slide out, as all the ports on the left side of the camera are for video (headphone, microphone, HDMI), and one would never shoot video in portrait orientation. IMO, this just added unnecessary cost, as a standard, 1/4-20 mounted L-Plate like what comes with the E-M1 & E-M5 II would have sufficed. While it would be nice to have for shooting portrait-orientation landscapes for stitching, I'm not sure it justifies its $100 price tag if I'm being honest.

    Other than that, it looks great. I ordered my E-M1 II last night from Adorama, and it should be in my hands Thursday. I may end up doing an E-M1 vs E-M5 II vs E-M1 II shoot-out, but we'll see how much free time I have.
     
  6. Pstmstr

    Pstmstr Mu-43 Regular

    52
    Mar 22, 2016
    Got mine yesterday. They did notify me with a shipping notice and tracking number. Very well made and feels "really right". :)
     
  7. MrJones

    MrJones Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Feb 19, 2017
    Maybe Moonhawk and others that have this plate can shed more light on this aspect of the design but to me the main benefit of having a different design would have been to be able to use the LCD tilted while the portrait plate was still attached. If I'm not able to do that then I would likely just keep the portrait plate in my bag and attach it when needed so that the rest of the time I'm free to use the rear LCD tilted. From the pictures it looks like you can extend and open and close the LCD easier with the L plate expanded but it doesn't look like you can tilt the LCD. I was hoping for a creative design but it might be too much of a challenge based on the camera size.
     
  8. moonhawk

    moonhawk Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    309
    Feb 12, 2016
    Dave Cherry
    Interesting question!
     
  9. moonhawk

    moonhawk Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    309
    Feb 12, 2016
    Dave Cherry

    It just showed up.
     
  10. moonhawk

    moonhawk Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    309
    Feb 12, 2016
    Dave Cherry
    Do you mean slide out as in multiple positions available, or slide out as in it's a two piece L plate? If the former, extending it allows you to open the LCD further. If the latter, I prefer two piece so I can leave the base plate on all the time. I like how it affects the grip, though it is not as necessary as it is on the mkI.
     
  11. moonhawk

    moonhawk Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    309
    Feb 12, 2016
    Dave Cherry
    I'm not a big fan of the swivel type LCD. I prefer the tilt only on the mkI and on my D500.

    There is very limited tilt available with the portrait arm attached, in either position.
     
  12. pault

    pault Mu-43 Rookie

    22
    Jan 8, 2010
    There is another consideration. With the angle part extended and it is mounted in the ballhead ie portrait view then the LCD movement will be restricted.
     
  13. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    So with a camera like the A7R2, the port to connect a remote release is on the left hand side of the camera. This is an incredibly stupid location to put the remote release port, because if you want to shoot in portrait orientation from a tripod (as one often does when wanting to stitch images for a panorama, since shooting in portrait orientation will give your stitched image more height), you can't use a remote release. But, with the sliding L-plate from RRS, one could still mount the camera in portrait orientation on a tripod, and shoot with a remote release attached by sliding the L-plate away from the body.

    But with the E-M1 II, Olympus wised up and placed the remote access port on the right hand side of the body. Therefore, all of the ports on the left hand side of the camera are for video-only (headphone, microphone, USB-out). Because of this, there's really no need to incorporate a more expensive sliding L-plate over a traditional fixed L-plate that attaches to the base plate via a 1/4-20 screw. This means that anytime you want to use the fully articulating LCD, you can't have the L-plate attached.

    I agree that I would typically only use this with the base plate attached for 99% of the time. However, I do disagree about the swivel vs. tilt LCD. The swivel LCD is much more useful than the tilt for portrait oriented shooting, as you're able to adjust the angle of the rear LCD regardless of the camera's position and still see it. You can't do this with the E-M1.
     
  14. MrJones

    MrJones Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Feb 19, 2017
    I think I'd consider myself neutral between the tilt only and the swivel type LCD but if there isn't a good solution for an L plate that allows the swivel screen to tilt then I might prefer the tilt only as well.
     
  15. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    The LCD angle is always going to be restricted when mounted on a ballhead in portrait orientation. Really, you only need the LCD to open up to 90° for the instances when you're shooting from the ground, but still want to see the LCD.

    Where it's a problem is that you can't leave it on all the time, because it inhibits the user's ability to fully use the rear LCD when shooting in landscape orientation or hand-holding.
     
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  16. moonhawk

    moonhawk Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    309
    Feb 12, 2016
    Dave Cherry

    Here are a couple more shots, which show it mounted in portrait mode, extended all the way, and contracted all the way. When extended, there is quite a bit of pivot available as well. In both cases, I think there is adequate room to tilt it for low angle shooting.

    L7.

    L8.
     
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  17. Hypilein

    Hypilein Mu-43 Top Veteran

    756
    Mar 18, 2015
    The issue @ijm5012@ijm5012 is describing is that you now can't tilt the screen when in low angle landscape. I agree that for portrait shot the solution is good.
     
  18. moonhawk

    moonhawk Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    309
    Feb 12, 2016
    Dave Cherry

    Yup--This is about as good as you can do, which makes it a valid point. If this isn't enough, you can just remove the L section in landscape mode. This is how I use it most of the time anyway. L9.
     
  19. Hypilein

    Hypilein Mu-43 Top Veteran

    756
    Mar 18, 2015
    That would be fine for me. More convenient than taking parts of the L-plate off and on constantly. Thanks for the image.
     
  20. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    Thanks for the portrait-mounted shots @moonhawk@moonhawk . As I expected, even with the bracket fully against the body, there's still plenty of articulation to see the LCD for low-angle shots.

    I must say, after initially thinking I would purchase this for my E-M1 II, I'm a bit torn. I own the RRS baseplates for my E-M1's & E-M5 II, along with one of their 1/4-20 mounted L-plates, and I've been very satisfied with them. However, at $80 for the baseplate and $100 extra for the L-bracket, I'm not certain this provides sufficient value to justify the cost. Had they managed to figure out a way to allow the articulation of the screen in landscape mode, then I could maybe see paying $180 (plus shipping). But after seeing this, I'm not certain.

    The other thing that confuses me is the design of the baseplate. On the front side, there is a gap between the arca mount and the section that is under the grips (see image below, where the area colored red is missing material). One of the reasons I went with the RRS plate for my E-M1's was because a number of the knock-off plates were designed like this, yet the RRS was solid all the way across, and it looked much better. IMO, this looks cheaper.

    I may end up holding off and seeing what other options show up on the market in the next few months. In the meantime, I'll just attach my Joby Ultraplate to the bottom, which gives me the second mounting strap for a hand strap, just like the RRS plates do.


    RRS E-M1 II Base Plate

    upload_2017-3-8_7-47-34.


    RRS E-M1 Base Plate

    upload_2017-3-8_7-43-47.

    upload_2017-3-8_7-44-13.
     

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