Got my G1 but i need help

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by greye05, Sep 6, 2012.

  1. greye05

    greye05 Mu-43 Regular

    32
    Aug 14, 2012
    Hello guys,

    Yesterday i finally received my G1 and to my surprise in much better condition that in the description is all most mint and beautiful.

    I have some trouble with the settings for shooting with legacy lens right now the only lens i have is a minolta 50mm f1.7 PF.

    I tried shooting with it, using the sunny f16 rule but my photos seem to be really dark and if i use the on camera meter i get blur. Any ideas on what i can do or what should i tried .
     
  2. eno789

    eno789 Mu-43 Regular

    193
    Jul 5, 2010
    Bay Area, California
    Brian
    I almost always use adapted lens in aperture priority mode, and rely on the stop down metering of the camera.

    When you got blur, what was the shutter speed, what was the aperture you set on the lens?
     
  3. theconejo

    theconejo Mu-43 Rookie

    21
    Aug 31, 2012
    chicago.
    Do you have the lens wide open and then check what the camera says as the "suggested" aperture? I have a Minolta 1.4 coming, might be here already, and I haven't looked up much about using them, for tips and such.

    I guess, thanks for starting this thread!
     
  4. eno789

    eno789 Mu-43 Regular

    193
    Jul 5, 2010
    Bay Area, California
    Brian
    In aperture priority mode, I set the aperture on the lens by rotating the aperture ring, the camera tells me what shutter speed it will use with the currently set ISO. So there's no "suggested" aperture.

    I did not start this thread BTW.
     
  5. ccunningham

    ccunningham Mu-43 Veteran

    453
    Jul 23, 2010
    Keep in mind you'll probably need to use a minimum shutter speed of at least 1/100 sec or so if you aren't using a tripod. If you're in aperture priority, and you've got the aperture wide-open (f1.4) and the shutter speed is slower than 1/100, you can bump the ISO to a higher value if it's not topped out already. If you review the images that are problematic in the camera, you should be able to see the settings used for that photo by pressing the "display" button until the information is shown on the lcd with a reduced size view of the photo. On that info screen you should be able to find the ISO setting in use as well as the shutter speed. If you could post the shutter speed and ISO setting I could probably help more.
     
  6. greye05

    greye05 Mu-43 Regular

    32
    Aug 14, 2012
    Well when i tried to get a photo at f2.8 with iso 100 and 1/100th is really dark most of the times and to get a good image using the camera meter i need to get lower than 1/100.
     
  7. theconejo

    theconejo Mu-43 Rookie

    21
    Aug 31, 2012
    chicago.
    oops

    Thanks for clearing it up. I should read what I write sometimes, I would have figured out I was misunderstanding what you wrote.

    and the thanks was for the OP.
     
  8. eno789

    eno789 Mu-43 Regular

    193
    Jul 5, 2010
    Bay Area, California
    Brian
    What shooting mode did you use? Do you set all three (f2.8, iso100, 1/100s)? Or do you set aperture and iso, and let camera pick shutter speed?

    If you set all three, depends on the lighting, it might result under- or over- exposure.

    One test you can perform, if you get good exposure with sunny-16 rule, note down the shutter speed, leave the aperture and iso unchanged, and switch to aperture priority mode, does the camera pick a very different shutter speed?
     
  9. ccunningham

    ccunningham Mu-43 Veteran

    453
    Jul 23, 2010
    Right, so you would need to increase the iso or open the aperture since the photo is underexposed at 1/100th and f2.8 using iso 100. Basically you open the lens up to f2 or f1.4 and bump the iso to 400 or 800. This will increase the amount of light hitting the sensor and the light "sensitivity" of the sensor. Try this: use aperture priority auto exposure with the lens set to f2 and the iso set to 400 or 800, and see if the shutter speed the camera chooses is 1/100th or greater. If it is you should be able to get a decent exposure without blur from camera shake.
     
  10. greye05

    greye05 Mu-43 Regular

    32
    Aug 14, 2012
    Ok I will try it and report later, all my other result where on full manual.

    Ohh any sugestios for the settings on this camera or custom functions
     
  11. ccunningham

    ccunningham Mu-43 Veteran

    453
    Jul 23, 2010

    Here's how I configured my G2 - which is pretty much a restyled G1 with video recording (which I don't use anyway,) but they more alike than different.

    I set the auto iso limit to 800 since I only use 1600 when I have to. YMMV, some people think 1600 is fine, I think it's a little too noisy, but that's kind of up to you and what you think. I can flip the iso setting to auto if I need to use the camera in varying lighting and not have to worry about resetting the iso continually.

    I turned on the display grid lines cause I like them most of the time.

    I picked a couple of film styles I liked and configured the film style bracketing to use them. That way I can get get a color jpg and bw jpg from the film style bracketing, which I've always thought was useful.

    If you have any legacy lenses you're using with adapters you can just leave the shoot w/out lens setting on.


    Some people like to tune the time to sleep feature for their own needs. I usually just leave it at the default.


    And here's one I forgot, although it doesn't have anything to do with settings. Don't zoom in to 16X on the camera display to judge whether a shot is sharp or not, because at that high a magnification you might think the photo isn't sharp, when it really is fine. If the shot looks sharp at 8X, it's probably fine. Before you make the final call on whether a frame is technically good (which isn't necessarily the same thing as a good photo aesthetically,) review on a computer with a reasonably decent, reasonably well calibrated monitor. And of course the shot might work aesthetically even if it isn't technically good (sharp, histogram isn't clipped, etc.)
     
  12. JoeV

    JoeV Mu-43 Regular

    85
    Aug 22, 2012
    Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    Joe Van Cleave
    Some general tips for shooting with manual lenses (I've owned a G1 since 2008).

    Enable "Shoot w/out lens" in menu. Obviously you've done this already.

    Aperture priority mode. This is the mode you want the mode dial to stay in. The camera can't tell what aperture the lens is set to (there are no electronic connections between lens and camera), so as you vary the aperture it selects the shutter speed to match the metering at the selected ISO.

    Make sure your manual lens is the kind that you can manually alter the iris without it mounted to a camera. Some older lenses required a mechanical connection between film camera body and lens to enable the variable aperture. You should be able to turn the f-stop ring and visually see the aperture move in the lens itself.

    Exposure settings: Use an appropriate ISO for your light level. A noisy image but with sharp features is usually better than a "clean" image that's blurry. Don't fear turning up the ISO to about 800; anything over that it's best to use B/W.

    Exposure compensation. This can get you. Make sure you haven't pressed the front dial wheel and then turned it to mistakenly turn down the exposure compensation. In the VF, in "A" aperture priority mode, you should see "f0," the shutter speed and your exposure compensation as a linear bar graph. (The "f0" is because you're using a manual lens where the camera doesn't know the aperture setting). Make sure the exposure compensation is centered in the bar graph.

    Metering: I like to use center weighted metering, but not as small of a metering box as spot metering. A box of about 1/3 the width of the screen works best for me on the G1.

    It's also possible the picture is "blurry" because your manual adapter was machined to the wrong dimensions and you can't focus. A slim possibility, but one you can eliminate by racking focus manually in live view and ensuring that you can sharply focus on a hard object. You should be able to focus both directions from optimally sharp. You should also check infinity focus, select a very far away but solid well-defined object and manually focus in live view.

    Also, check the diopter adjustment on the EVF, it might be misadjusted for you eyes' prescription.

    ~Joe
     
  13. greye05

    greye05 Mu-43 Regular

    32
    Aug 14, 2012
    Ok I have check the EVF and adjusted it to my view. Whats the center weighted metering and how do i use it?

    Everyone thanks for your help some of my first pic coming soon
     
  14. greye05

    greye05 Mu-43 Regular

    32
    Aug 14, 2012
    Hello guys here are some jpegs, my photographic eye is so bad hahhaha, no composition at all.
    [​IMG]
    This was my first attempt at light room
    Form here on they are jpeg.
     
  15. greye05

    greye05 Mu-43 Regular

    32
    Aug 14, 2012
    Here are some of the jpegs i took today.
    My first attempt at night.
    [​IMG]

    Second Attempt
    [​IMG]

    Some Anole lizard
    [​IMG]

    No composition hahaha :D
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This were my first attempts with the camera in Aperture priority
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    First Raw file edited in light room 4 wich i dont understand at all.
    [​IMG]
     
  16. ccunningham

    ccunningham Mu-43 Veteran

    453
    Jul 23, 2010
    Unfortunately I can't see any of these images.
     
  17. kevwilfoto

    kevwilfoto Mu-43 Veteran

    294
    Sep 23, 2011
    Colorado
    Those images don't look bad at all. If you're already on aperture priority and auto-ISO, perhaps you should raise your exposure compensation by +1/3 or +2/3 stop and see if the images look the way you want?