"Goodbye Cameras"- the New Yorker

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by Ranger Rick, Jan 1, 2014.

  1. wlewisiii

    wlewisiii Mu-43 Veteran

    240
    Dec 16, 2011
    Hayward, WI
    William Barnett-Lewis
    Eh, if it works for him, good for him. But I still need a finder to cross from snapshot to photograph - to give intention to art.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. caimi

    caimi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 13, 2012
    middle US
    Caimi caimiphotography.com
    As much as I love cameras, I can't argue with much of what Mr. Mod says in this article. I have rebelled against taking photos with my telephone even as I believe it is the future of photography. I belong to a generation that romanticized photography and photographers and their wonderful equipment. But things change.
     
  3. This article is indicative of someone who has lost interest in the process of photography and now just wants to take nice pictures and upload them to social media sites ASAP. It seems that less younger photographers are picking up traditional cameras, and even some existing photographers are beginning to put them down.
     
    • Like Like x 8
  4. fortwodriver

    fortwodriver Mu-43 Top Veteran

    959
    Nov 15, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Frank
    Hard to say. I've seen quite a few young people buy those Nikon and Canon kits (especially the ones that come with two lenses and a backpack) and snap away. Yes they do post almost immediately to Facebook to get their photos out there but I also see a few getting Flickr accounts and lots of young people coming and going from the local photo shops pickup up prints that are larger than 5x7...

    I was in Michaels the other day and a guy who looked to be about 15 was with his mom getting a print framed and mounted for school. It was a cool picture of the Verrazano bridge taken with his little Nikon 3200 (he had it with him). That's cool!

    Remember the 80s and 90s when far more people had point-and-shoots than SLRs? It kinda feels like that again - with cellphone-cams taking up the P&S purpose.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Actually I recently sold my Canon 17-55mm f2.8 lens to a young fellow of only about 15 or 16 (technically his Mum bought it but you know what I mean). It was quite cool to see someone so young with enough interest in photography to invest (again, for his Mum to invest :smile:) in some quality equipment.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. RoadTraveler

    RoadTraveler Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 23, 2012

    Wow, not an easy or fun read but I did it anyway… I think the first few comments below the article that I quoted above say it well. Statements I agree with.

    I still love my GX1, and my many lenses that go with it, not just one standard or kit lens. Not to say excellent work and art can't be accomplished with 'one' lens, we know it can. But different lenses are one of the differences between a camera system and a compact camera, be it a iPhone or other compact. I do own and use an iPhone, but I don't participate in social media. I do share a few images via email or online, I don't have the same sense of immediacy to post my images. Printing (large) is a goal for 2014.
     
  7. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    Samsung gets it.
    That's why we're beginning to see products like these from Samsung.


    samsung_ek_gc110zwaxar_gc110_galaxy_camera_wi_fi_937451.

    IMG_306957.

    IMG_323043.

    IMG_323045.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. RichDesmond

    RichDesmond Mu-43 Veteran

    356
    Nov 18, 2011
    Good article, I think it sums up nicely the position and feeling about photography that many people have. Not the way I do things, or what's important to me, but I'm sure I'm in a shrinking minority.
    I have a 22 year old niece who takes beautiful shots with her iPhone. At one point I gave her a Canon DSLR, which she messed with a little but now sits unused. It just didn't fit her life or the way she does or thinks about things. Using the same sort of workflow that the author describes, in her hands the phone is a wonderful creative tool, one that opens up possibilities that the DSLR doesn't allow.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Fmrvette

    Fmrvette This Space For Rent

    May 26, 2012
    Detroit, Michigan
    Jim
    Wait - a magazine is predicting the death of another industry???

    Now that is some serious irony (of which The New Yorker is known for having it's fair share :biggrin:).

    Next thing ya know newspapers will be in trouble...

    (With tongue firmly in cheek, I stagger off into the darkness...).

    Regards,

    Jim

    (I'm so old that I remember when people had broken toasters repaired....)
     
    • Like Like x 11
  10. DynaSport

    DynaSport Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 5, 2013
    Dan
    There's no doubt that for many, phones are good enough. My iPhone actually takes pretty nice pictures in the right conditions. But it still won't do what my cameras will. When it does, I may quit using my camera. And I don't see anything sad about that. I drive a car after all, instead of a horse and carriage and am glad of it. But even with cars, some people still enjoy riding horses and even with motorcycles many still ride bicycles. So, I don't see cameras going totally away for a really long time.
     
  11. usayit

    usayit Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    • Like Like x 1
  12. snkenai

    snkenai Mu-43 Top Veteran

    523
    Sep 5, 2010
    I enjoyed the story, of one mans journey through time, in photography. It reminded me of my own.

    We all respond to progress in different ways. It changes as our primary goals mature, or are abandoned. My photography has been in a state of change lately, due to changing personal limited mobility, etc. Therefore my attitude toward the equipment is changing. I am looking to have less investment, without totally eliminating photography, the way I like to do it. Translated, it means older equipment that still gives me what I want, in terms of resolution etc., but not too large and heavy. I don't expect, to ever go the camera phone route, but a return to the Olympus E-420 and 25mm pancake lens, might just be what works for me. ( I owned this combo before, but chased the latest developments in mirror-less, for a while. Getting it back from my son, in trade for the E-p3)
     
  13. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
  14. nickthetasmaniac

    nickthetasmaniac Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2011
    Interesting, given that his original Annapurna article using the GF1 was one of the things that convinced me to go MFT...
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. fortwodriver

    fortwodriver Mu-43 Top Veteran

    959
    Nov 15, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Frank
    Yeah, but also make it look pretty. To me, the Samsung devices look kinda cheap. The iPhone really showed the world that a phone could have metal parts, shininess that wasn't plastic and glass that wouldn't break if you breathed on it wrong.

    So, now, it's rinse-repeat.

    Lots of people look at the iPhone in one hand, and a Samsung in the other hand and see the difference in build quality.
    That hurt HTC a lot when the first iPhone came out. People picked the shiny metal and glass device over the shiny plastic device.
     
  16. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    I sure see a lot of those "ugly" Samsung phones in the wild....:smile:
     
  17. fortwodriver

    fortwodriver Mu-43 Top Veteran

    959
    Nov 15, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Frank
    Oh hey I'm not saying people don't buy these. They do. There are lots of phone users out there and Samsung is one of the largest - to the point where they're one of the ones hurting the least. HTC was in that position at one point - they were nearly invincible. Now they're just barely hanging on with cellphone sales.
     
  18. Fmrvette

    Fmrvette This Space For Rent

    May 26, 2012
    Detroit, Michigan
    Jim
    I'm working along the same lines - I put a 20mm pancake on my E-M5 awhile back and have really been enjoying the combination while the rest of the kit languishes in the cupboard. My first "real" camera was a Pen-FT with a 38mm lens and I used that combination for years. Returning to a small lens (although the 38mm on half-frame was approx. a 55mm equiv and the 20mm is only a 40mm equiv) and a small body is like coming home. I was tempted to move to a 25mm but the size of the lens was worrisome; the pancake 20mm is the "Goldilocks" size for me..

    Regards,

    Jim
     
    • Like Like x 1
  19. usayit

    usayit Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Obviously you haven't held the NX300.

    400x400_3.

    No that's not plastic looking like metal. That is a metal body and chassis. As for me, I would prefer the Galaxy S4 Zoom to NOT be metal as the iphone. The weight of the camera/smartphone itself should be kept low since we are adding better optics and a zoom mechanism in a package that should still be weight competitive of a regular smartphone. The Samsung NX300 feels fine in the hand has a larger sensor than our MFT... but I'm still sticking with MFT. Then again, MFT isn't my primary camera.