Going on Safari in Southern Africa... Help

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by larryis1, Feb 24, 2016.

  1. larryis1

    larryis1 Mu-43 Regular

    74
    Mar 23, 2015
    Southern Nevada, USA
    Larry
    Will be visiting South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe, and Namibia in May. We be doing a number of safari drives in the various parks. Plan on taking my 12-40mm and my Pany 45-175mm. For low light evening shots I need something faster should I luck out and encounter a lion or the like near camp. Would the 25mm or the 45mm or something else be best for such situations. Feedback appreciated.

    Thanks, Larry
     
  2. mcasan

    mcasan Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 26, 2014
    Atlanta
    The wife and I have done several safaris. We did our first one with m43 equipment in November in Kenya. I would suggest that anyone going on an expensive or once in a lifetime trip always have two camera bodies. That is because one could be lost, stolen, or malfunction. Also you do not want to be changing lens out in the field where there is usually dust and/or sand in the air. If you don't want to purchase a second body, rent one. If I shot Panasonic, I would take two GX8 bodies, the PL 100-400 (hope it ships before you leave) and 35-100 f2.8 for wildlife, and the 12-35 f2.8 for landscapes.
     
  3. Hypilein

    Hypilein Mu-43 Veteran

    294
    Mar 18, 2015
    I think before worrying if you can shoot a lion with a 25mm lens in low light you will want to increase range as much as possible. That means either the P100-300 or if you can afford it (and if it arrives in time) the new P100-400. @mcasan@mcasan 's setup would be ideal, but for most of us, when we go on a big trip, we don't really have the money left over to buy too many new items.

    Another option that can often be cheaper if the trip is long enough is buying used and selling after the trip. (Not possible with the P100-400 though).
     
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  4. davdenic

    davdenic Mu-43 Regular

    186
    Oct 14, 2014
    Switzerland
    David D.
    Hi
    The 12-40 @2.8 is ok for low light.
    You probably need more long tele like an used pana 100-300 or used oly 75-300 or the 40-150/2.8 + 1.4 or the new pana 100-400.
    I have a safari in 10 days I will use 12-40 and 40-150/2.8+1.4. Unfortunately the new pana 100-400 wouldn't arrive in time for my trip but maybe you are in time.
    With the 40-150+1.4 I shot many wildlife in Australia.

    Crocodile, Kakadu Australia

    Wallaby or Kangaroo?

    sea eagle
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2016
  5. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    If you need something faster you need a 1.8 so the 45 or the 75 (considering you already have the 12-40). Or some expensive adapted Four Thirds lenses with the E-M1. The 25 outdoor for animals seems really wide, and again you have the 12-40 with a small tripod for sunset shots. Yes, lions are big but you usually do not want to get too close.

    Going from 5.6 to f4 for a few evening shots that may or may not happen in a very specific and short period of the day won't make any difference IMO. Suppose you are already at ISO 1600, SS 1/500, f/5.6. This means the sun is already low. After 20 minutes you are at ISO 3200. You can swap to an f4 lens and get another 20 minutes at ISO 1600, that's it. Yes, 2.8 is much better but you are still fighting with the "twilight zone" :)
    And if you start to crop at high ISO the result is even worse.

    An f/5.6 to f/4 or f/2.8 lens can make a big difference during the day, where you can keep shooting at 1/1000 and all the pictures you take in good light can benefit from that extra ISO stop if/when needed, maybe a couple of hours in the morning and two in the afternoon.
     
  6. dornblaser

    dornblaser Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 13, 2012
    Chicago-area
    David Dornblaser
    We stayed at Mala Mala in South Africa and watched a pride of lions hunt in an open Land Rover. We followed the pride and when it was dark the pride passed by us, we could have reached out and touched them. I asked our guide why they didn't seem acknowledge us and he said that they just recognized the vehicle and not us. Very cool experience. So what does this have to with your gear? Nothing. I also agree with mcasan's suggestion or the Olympus equivalent plus the 45mm.
     
  7. davdenic

    davdenic Mu-43 Regular

    186
    Oct 14, 2014
    Switzerland
    David D.
    The 40-150/2.8 +1.4 even if is short gives that extra light.
    On a em1 you can try the four third 50-200. Quite cheap nowadays and maybe with the ec14 you can gain extra reach. I've used a lot in the past and I think it remains one of the best alternative.
    40-150+1.4 = 210 f/4 (420mm eq)
    50-200+1.4 = 280 f/5 (560mm eq)

    I prefer to have a zoom instead of a fix but the new oly 300 seems wonderful


    Sent by HAL 9000
     
  8. Holoholo55

    Holoholo55 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 13, 2014
    Honolulu, HI
    Walter
    Hehehe... that was my thought exactly. If you're close enough to shoot a lion with a 25mm, you're way too close! :biggrin:

    If it were me, picking from my existing gear, I'd definitely take my 12-40 Pro on my EM5 and 50-200 SWD with EC-14 TC on my EM1. Other than those, I'd consider taking one or two of the following: 9-18, 17 f1.8, or 45 f1.8. I might buy a 75 f1.8 for stuff that's fairly close, but not too close. :)
     
  9. mcasan

    mcasan Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 26, 2014
    Atlanta
    In the Mara during November we had cheetahs climb onto the trucks. One climbed our windshield. The image is from E-M1 with 40-150 Pro at 150mm. In the pupils you can see the reflection of the lens opening and my arm. This is why I take Pro lenses to the field.
     

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  10. larryis1

    larryis1 Mu-43 Regular

    74
    Mar 23, 2015
    Southern Nevada, USA
    Larry
    Incredible photo.
     
  11. larryis1

    larryis1 Mu-43 Regular

    74
    Mar 23, 2015
    Southern Nevada, USA
    Larry
    Thanks every one for the helpful feedback.
     
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  12. dornblaser

    dornblaser Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 13, 2012
    Chicago-area
    David Dornblaser
    + 1
     
  13. mattia

    mattia Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 3, 2012
    The Netherlands
    If you own an E-M1 the 43 50-200 is kind of a no brainier. Worked great for me in Tanzania. I would probably take the 150/2.0 along now too.

    For native, the 100-400 would work very well. Even if a bit slow on the long end, the range and flexibility is worth a lot.
     
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  14. GRID

    GRID Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 22, 2011
    I had a Canon 300mm F2.8 FD (bought it for 500$) on a Panasonic GH1 when I went to Tanzania, on my GF2 i had the pana 20mm almost all the time (Samyang 7,5mm sometimes)
    Ngorogoro_Crater_15__.

    Serengeti_53__.

    Serengeti_01__.

    Serengeti_21__.

    Serengeti_11__.

    More images on my site if you scroll down to images from 2012.
     
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  15. larryis1

    larryis1 Mu-43 Regular

    74
    Mar 23, 2015
    Southern Nevada, USA
    Larry
    Thanks for sharing, all wonderful,photos. Take care.


     
  16. Holoholo55

    Holoholo55 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 13, 2014
    Honolulu, HI
    Walter
    Larry, these articles may be helpful. It's worth going to Dalla's Photographers Travel Flickr page to see some of his photos and the gear he used. While he talks about the 40-150 Pro in the first article, he ends up saying that the 50-200 SWD might have been a better choice.
    Articles - Gone Shooting
    Articles - Travel and Other Stories

    No, not an endorsement, but still impressed. :)
     
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