Godox xpro: e-m1 limits speed to 1/250

walter_j

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I tried using the Godox x-pro on a bright day to get rid of shadows while taking portraits, but the camera can only use shutter speeds up to 1/250, which is too slow on a bright day - resulting in overexposure. Is there a way to get a higher sync speed from the mk 2 E-M1?

I asked on a Godox user group, and was told not to use the flash trigger on a bright day.
 

SilverShutter

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Depends on the flash but some (or most?) Godox flashes support High Speed Sync, to allow you to use high shutter speeds with flash. I would recomend looking into the specifics of your trigger and flash combination to make sure how to do it. Another route could be to use ND filters to reduce the exposure until you can use the 1/250th sync speed normally.
 

Sniksekk

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Are you in silent mode/electronic shutter mode?
 

SpecFoto

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I shoot outdoor portraits with flash, many times in the bright desert sun, with both my Sony A7RIV and EM1 MKIII, mostly using very fast f1.2 to f1.8 lenses which I tend to shoot wide open. Been using Godox since 2013 and love it. The original EM1 had a flash sync speed of 1/320, but that was only with Olympus flash, or it was cut to 1/250. Newer EM1's limit the flash sync to 1/250 regardless of brand. I use 3 methods to get around the flash sync limitations.

1. With the EM1 shoot at 100 ISO, which give you and extra stop before you reach the flash sync speed limit. This works great in sunny photos, I have been doing this with Olympus since my original EM5 with no issues and all EM1's since. Depending upon your lens speed this and shooting in manual, purposely underexposing the ambient by 1 or 2 stops, then using the flash as fill, also in manual at lower power, may be all you need. Depending upon the ambient underexposure if your f-stop is range of f6.7 to f11 this should work on bright days without needing an ND filter. You are only trying to balance the flash to be close to ambient.

2. Use ND filters to cut the ambient light, reducing your ss. Most common is from 2 to 6 stops, the higher amount required for the faster the lens. This can be done in combo with the #1 to reduce the ND power needed. I have many ND's in different filter thread sizes and strengths. The majority are the B&W brand because they are brass rings, making them easy to slip on and off, and don't have a color cast.

3. Shoot in High Speed Sync which will highly reduce the flash power, but allow your camera to sync as high as 1/8,000 of a second. Not always reliable unfortunately, so take multiple shots as I find the 1st one is ofter quite different than the 2nd shot in exposure. For that reasons I only use this for fast action sequences, and rely on ND's instead.
 
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Sniksekk

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I shoot outdoor portraits, many times in the bright desert sun, with both my Sony A7RIV and EM1 MKIII, mostly using very fast f1.2 to f1.8 lenses which I tend to shoot wide open. Been using Godox since 2013 and love it. The original EM1 had a flash sync speed of 1/320, but that was only with Olympus flash, or it was cut to 1/250. Newer EM1's limit the flash sync to 1/250 regardless of brand. I use 3 methods to get around the flash sync limitations.

1. With the EM1 shoot at 100 ISO, which give you and extra stop before you reach the flash sync speed limit. This works great in sunny photos, I have been doing this with Olympus since my original EM5 with no issues and all EM1's since. Depending upon your lens speed this and shooting in manual, purposely underexposing the ambient by 1 or 2 stops, then using the flash as fill, also in manual at lower power, may be all you need. If your f-stop is f8 or more this should work on bright days without needing an ND filter. You are only trying to balance the flash to be close to ambient.

2. Use ND filters to cut the ambient light, reducing your ss. Most common is from 2 to 6 stops, the higher amount required for the faster the lens. This can be done in combo with the #1 to reduce the ND power needed. I have many ND's in different filter thread sizes and strengths. The majority are the B&W brand because they are brass rings, making them easy to slip on and off, and don't have a color cast.

3. Shoot in High Speed Sync which will highly reduce the flash power, but allow your camera to sync as high as 1/8,000 of a second. Not always reliable unfortunately, so take multiple shots as I find the 1st one is ofter quite different than the 2nd shot in exposure. For that reasons I only use this for fast action sequences, and rely on ND's instead.
I have a V1 and a Godox something 350.
I always use HSS, never thought about the “slow” flash synch speed after I bought godox.
 

SpecFoto

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I have a V1 and a Godox something 350.
I always use HSS, never thought about the “slow” flash synch speed after I bought godox.
That's because your subject is pretty close to the flash, which is probably mounted to the camera, as HSS will greatly reduce the power output. Many times I am trying to light up a model 5 or 10 meters from me, which requires full power of a AD360 (300 watt seconds) or stronger flash, can't be done with a V1 or V350, they simply don't have enough power. V350 is about 55 w.s of power, V1 about double that.
 
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PakkyT

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Is there a way to get a higher sync speed from the mk 2 E-M1?
The X-Sync speed is there because if your shutter is too fast, the sensor is never fully exposed at one time which will leave a dark band on your photo. So your choices are using some sort of high speed sync if the flash supports it on Olympus or slowing the shutter down by a ND filter and/or a polarizer and/or stopping down the aperture.

Not sure what exactly that user group meant by not using a flash trigger on a bright day as the way you wanted to use it is one of the common ways to use a flash (they aren't just for darkness).
 

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