GH2 "Rain Gear" ?

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by Wasabi Bob, Aug 25, 2011.

  1. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    I'm wondering if anyone has or knows of any protective rain gear that the GH2 can be placed into during rainy weather? I know EWA marine has one case that is said to be suitable for underwater use.

    With the approaching hurricane, I wish I had something for the weekend!

  2. lannes

    lannes Mu-43 Regular

    Jul 15, 2011
    Perth, Australia
  3. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Had some questions

    Tried contacting DICApac - every e-mail address bounces back. Looks like they closed their doors!
  4. thearne3

    thearne3 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Jan 28, 2010
    Redding, CT USA
  5. John M Flores

    John M Flores Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 7, 2011
    Somerville, NJ
  6. flash

    flash Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 29, 2010
    1 hour from Sydney Australia.
    Real Name:
    I've never had a camera fail in the rain, including the GH2, which got Norway weather for 5 weeks.

    If you're worried just use the old plastic bag with a hole, taped to a lens hood trick.

  7. Tom Swaman

    Tom Swaman Mu-43 Veteran


    From my experience, you are totally correct. I have purchased camera raingear several times and always found that being careful and using zip-loc or equal bags was just as good as the best of rain gear. Of course, I would not try to shoot a GH2 or any other expensive camera into the wind in a strong storm. The latter porpose is what first surface mirrors and other reflective devices do best.

    Best regards,
  8. Nico Foto

    Nico Foto Mu-43 Rookie

    Jul 30, 2011
    Montevideo, Uruguay
    My experience with ziplocks is BAD! I had all kinds of water condensation and filtering on the inside of the bag...then again, i was shooting under downpour, so not like it was a "casual rain"...
  9. JudyM

    JudyM Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 5, 2010
    Westminster, MD
    Amazon has them in stock, I just purchased the WPH10 for my Gf1. It's rather large with the 20mm mounted, but fits well with the 14-45mm. The vinyl is pretty heavy, making it a little cumbersome to use, but it should protect against pretty much anything wet you want to throw at it. I bought it primarily to protect the camera against salt spray and waves when I get really close to the surf at the beach.

    I've also been using a Vortex Storm Jacket for my 5D Mark II. It's extremely compact and lightweight to keep in your bag. I've used it in light to moderate rain, salt spray, and blowing sand and it worked great. Just be aware that these kinds of jackets and bags also keep moisture in as well as out. I tuck a couple of silica gel packs in them to minimize condensation.
  10. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran


    On the Vortex, does it just hang over the back, or is there some way to secure it? This looks like it might be the most convenient. I'm concerned that plastic bag type enclosures will build up condensation.

    I appreciate everyone's suggestions. I think I need to visit B&H and Adorama to see these face to face.
  11. JudyM

    JudyM Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 5, 2010
    Westminster, MD
    The Vortex Storm Jacket is a tapered fabric tube with locking drawstrings at both ends. The lens goes through the narrow end and is tightened around the lens with the drawstring. Your lens hood goes on after the jacket is secured around the lens and plays an important part in sheilding the lens from rain. I use a filter over the lens for added protection. The wider end of the jacket can be left open to put your hands inside, or it can be totally closed if weather becomes too inclement, or it can be mostly closed with just the camera's eyepiece left exposed.


    The 14 to 27" size is pictured on the 5D Mark II, which is long enough to cover the camera and the 400mm f5.6L. Smaller sizes are available. A storage pouch is included that you can clip to your bag. If I'm not sure of the weather, or I expect to be in dusty, misty or salty conditions, I can put the jacket on, roll it down around the lens to have it ready, then just unroll it over the camera when needed. It looks bulkier in the picture than it really is when rolled back, but I didn't really try to compact it. You could use a rubber band, or one of those velcro strips used for securing computer cables.


    The Dicapac is not the most user-friendly means of protecting the camera against wetness, but it's probably the best solution if you plan to expose the camera to extreme wet conditions. The Gf1 with the 20mm will fit into the bag without removing the lens. If using a longer lens, like the 14-45mm, you'd have to remove it, insert the body only into the bag, then re-attach the lens through the lens port. I'm not crazy about exposing the sensor while inserting the camera into the bag, but it will just require extra care to be taken.

  12. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran


    I've ordered the DICApak and I may also pick up one of the Vortex. Poor planning on my part, as I sit here watching the hurricane come up the coast.

    Atlantic City had a tornado about a half hour ago, and now Atlantic County had their power cut. Looks like I just might get some use out of the underwater P&S camera, above water!

    I appreciate all the feedback and suggestions.
    For those in the hurricane area, stay dry and be safe!
  13. JudyM

    JudyM Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 5, 2010
    Westminster, MD
    We're getting steady rain and 20 mph winds now. The Weather Channel predicts the storm will hit us about 2 AM. It's going to be an interesting night.