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GH2 exposure and WB preview woes - help

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by Armanius, Jun 29, 2011.

  1. Armanius

    Armanius Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 23, 2010
    Houston
    Muttley
    My GH2 sometimes gives me exposure and white balance preview that is way off. Everything looks good while I'm looking through the EVF or on the LCD. I take the photo, and then the color is way off, and the image is underexposed.

    I've been must shrugging it off as a quirk on the GH2. But now I'm wondering if I'm the only one that is experiencing this issue.

    To the other GH2 users, any experience with what I'm talking about?

    Thanks!
     
  2. sprinke

    sprinke Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 5, 2011
    Pasadena, CA
    Debi
    What settings are on the camera when this happens?
     
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  3. Hikari

    Hikari Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 26, 2010
    Or more to the point, what conditions are you shooting under? You may just want to switch to a preset WB and manual exposure or AE with exposure compensation.
     
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  4. Armanius

    Armanius Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 23, 2010
    Houston
    Muttley
    My usual settings are:

    - Aperture priority
    - WB in auto
    - ISO in auto

    I have manually selected one of the WB presets, and I still get colors on my EVF and LCD that don't match the actual colors that I see after I take the shot.

    The conditions where the problems arise are typically indoor lighting conditions.

    I have used exposure compensation, but it's hard to judge how much to apply when the EVF and LCD are already showing that the photo is properly exposed.

    I guess I'm not as worried about WB, because I shoot RAW, and I can tweak those during PP. But the underposure is more troublesome.

    I guess no other GH2 owners are experiencing this issue?
     
  5. Ralser

    Ralser Mu-43 Regular

    67
    May 28, 2011
    I don't have a gh2, but I'm thinking of changing to it. Shouldn't you use the histogram to evaluate exposure? Doesn't the camera display a jpeg image - which will be different to the raw image that you capture?
     
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  6. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    EXIF data

    It would be helpful if you could post an original (not modified) photo that could be downloaded. The EXIF data may give a clue to what is taking place. When shooting indoors, are you using a flash, and at what ISO? Does this only occur indoors, or outdoors as well?
     
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  7. Armanius

    Armanius Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 23, 2010
    Houston
    Muttley
    I'll try to replicate the conditions in my house tonight. Thanks for the input.
     
  8. Tom Swaman

    Tom Swaman Mu-43 Veteran

    Armanius,

    What Class are your SD cards? Please do not believe what is written in the manual. You need Class 10 caeds and sometimes shooting rapidly you may also get a missed exposure by a full 1 to 4 stops. I learned the hard way, but I learned.

    In what format are you shooting? If you are shooting in Fine RAW + JPEG, consider changing to just RAW. This ought to help.

    Good luck,
    Tom
     
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  9. sprinke

    sprinke Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 5, 2011
    Pasadena, CA
    Debi
    Do you have compact fluorescent lights in your house? I sometimes get wonky results using AWB under those lighting conditions. I usually set a custom white balance instead, and the pictures look good.
     
  10. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Try using AEL. It could be that at the point of shooting (by default your Exposure is read one last time as you half-press the shutter) you are getting a different Exposure reading. AEL will allow you to lock the exposure at a set point, THEN take the photo.
     
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  11. Armanius

    Armanius Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 23, 2010
    Houston
    Muttley
    I do have a class 10 and shoot RAW only. But I don't think the write speed is the issue, because I'm just taking one shot.
     
  12. Armanius

    Armanius Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 23, 2010
    Houston
    Muttley
    The light in my house is that squirly weird looking energy efficient light bulbs that the US Congress is forcing people to buy (even though it has mercury in it).

    I have tried using custom white balance too. I'll try again and see what happens.
     
  13. Armanius

    Armanius Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 23, 2010
    Houston
    Muttley
    Thanks for the tip Ned. I'll try that tonight.
     
  14. sprinke

    sprinke Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 5, 2011
    Pasadena, CA
    Debi
    Those would be compact fluorescents. They do sell daylight-balanced ones, but they are expensive (like $10-15 each). I have a few that I use for tabletop studio photography. But the garden-variety ones I've used around the house have horrible color for photography, really yellow.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Aside from the time it takes to write the image to the card, the speed of the card would not influence the exposure, nor should photos be "missed". Class 10 cards would be required for motion video, but for still images there is no improvement in the image quality. Much of my work is shot bracketed, so while a slower card will take a bit longer to write the successive images to the card, the end result is the same. Keep in mind that your camera has an internal buffer that holds the images until they are transfered.

    One more point regarding SD cards, stay with known brands. I've been burned buying cheap no name brands on EBAY.
     
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  16. Tom Swaman

    Tom Swaman Mu-43 Veteran

    Wasabi Bob,

    I hear what you are saying, but about five weeks ago, I started having similar problems to thpose originally described by Armanius. I ws shooting photos of my dogs in the yard rather rapidly. I was shoooting in RAW + JPEG Fine. I got highly varient exposures, mainly one or two correct and then a series of two to three exposures light. I found that I was using slower cards and I increased to faster write cards and the problem did largely go away. I still occasionally experience a wierd light(apparent underexposure) and an apparent warm WB.

    I am wide open to suggestions and appreciative on any ideas. I do not shoot movies.

    Thanks,
    Tom
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. zpierce

    zpierce Super Moderator

    661
    Sep 26, 2010
    Minneapolis, MN
    Zach
    That would have to be coincidence, the write speed of the card is irrelevant to the exposure / metering. As a former poster said, the photos are written to a buffer initially, not the card, the camera won't let you take a photo until the buffer has room, it has no bearing on how the camera meters and exposes the shot once it has room in the buffer to take a shot. An asynchronous process flushes the buffer to the card.

    Speaking from experience, shooting dogs in a yard can give highly variable exposures and results, they're running all over with all sorts of different backdrops. I wouldn't use that as a benchmark. If you shoot down with the dark grass as a backdrop they are exposed very differently than if you shoot farther away with some house or sky in the pic. Zoom in or out on the dog and their color / lightness or darkness plays more or less into the metering. If it's sunny, when they're on one side of you with the sun behind it's radically different than if they're on the other side with the sun in front.

    Bottom line is I think you should consider a more controlled test if you think there really is an issue.
     
  18. John M Flores

    John M Flores Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 7, 2011
    Somerville, NJ
    A) Do you have the camera set up to show you what the actual exposed photo will look like?

    OR

    B) Does the camera's LCD or EVF give you the same image no matter what aperture or shutter speed you select?

    IIRC, B is the way the camera is shipped and may explain your case.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  19. Tom Swaman

    Tom Swaman Mu-43 Veteran

    Zpierce,

    My information, right or wrong, comes to you directky from Panasonic relayed by me. Please believe me when I tell you that I do know how to shoot dogs and these were not running, just multiple head shots in rapid order.

    Regards,
    Tom
     
  20. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    We need to look at EXIF data

    Tom
    Make sure you aren't using SPOT metering. I recently helped a friend who was complaining that his photos were constantly over exposed. After looking at several of his photos (of his car) they were indeed very over exposed. It turns out that he was unknowingly using SPOT metering. His car happens to be a very dark blue, so the metering was brightening up the exposure based on the deep blue (and much darker) color of the car. I found this by examining the EXIF data. PhotoME also showed me the position of where SPOT was metering the photo.

    Can you post a photo that shows the problem?. The photo should be the original, as it came from the SD card. Do not rename it, nor modify it in any way. I'd be happy to see if I can find anything.

    If you can't post the photo, download PhotoME and I can walk you through the process to extract the EXIF data and paste it in a text message. It could be a good learning experience for everyone.

    BTW, to all... a Happy, SAFE and L O N G July 4th weekend!