G9 Battery Capacity and Card Capacity, and folders

Brownie

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Camera is set to highest quality, jpeg and RAW.

Last Sunday I attended two events and shot 1400 (2800 files jpeg/RAW on the computer) photos/videos, about 10 were 15-30 second video clips. Before I went I charged all four of my batteries, which includes one Panasonic and three Wasabi. Starting out with a new battery I had to change at the second event and came home with half a battery left. If we do the math, that's a little over 900 photos per battery. I have noticed this on many occasions, and can't ever recall having to use a third battery. This is WAY over the 300+ rating.

I am using 64G cards. The camera is set up to store on #1 and switch to #2 when #1 is full. It has never switched. According to what I can find, a 64G SD card can store 2100 photos +/-. I suspect that means total files. So again, it exceeded the rating by a decent margin. Lastly, at about 900 shots the camera created another folder. I've never seen that happen before either.

What are your experiences with these?
 
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I get about 2500 raw images on each 64 gig card. Generally a folder will contain 1000 image files, depending on numbering. Batteries can give me over 1500 exposures in a short period or much fewer over a longer period. Power usage is pretty constant when the camera is on and depending on whether the lens has IS or not will determine how long the battery will last. The new battery for the S5 and the GH5 mk 2 will give you roughly double the capacity of the original batteries, in my experience anyway. I’ve gotten over 3000 files with one of those on an assignment, and still had juice left at the end.
 

Brownie

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Did the image numbers roll-over (start at 1 or whatever)? I'm wondering why it did that. It's nice that it did that, regardless.
No. Not sure what happened. It's entirely possible I did it while chimping or something, but it was weird. When I uploaded I didn't notice it at first. While reviewing the shots I noticed there were a lot missing, so I reloaded the card and saw the second folder. The other shots were in there.
 

ralf-11

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So, how do they come up with the battery rating of 300+?

CIPA sets a std. for comparison

but the CIPA ratings are:


G9 DMW-BLF19 (1860 mAH; 400 shots-CIPA)
GX-85 DMW-BLG10PP (930 mAh; 290 shots-CIPA)
GX9 DMW-BLG10E (930 mAH; 260 shots-CIPA)
GM-5 DMW-BLH7 (680 mAh; 220 shots-CIPA)
 

sbm

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Camera is set to highest quality, jpeg and RAW.

Last Sunday I attended two events and shot 1400 (2800 files jpeg/RAW on the computer) photos/videos, about 10 were 15-30 second video clips. Before I went I charged all four of my batteries, which includes one Panasonic and three Wasabi. Starting out with a new battery I had to change at the second event and came home with half a battery left. If we do the math, that's a little over 900 photos per battery. I have noticed this on many occasions, and can't ever recall having to use a third battery. This is WAY over the 300+ rating.

I am using 64G cards. The camera is set up to store on #1 and switch to #2 when #1 is full. It has never switched. According to what I can find, a 64G SD card can store 2100 photos +/-. I suspect that means total files. So again, it exceeded the rating by a decent margin. Lastly, at about 900 shots the camera created another folder. I've never seen that happen before either.

What are your experiences with these?

This all tracks pretty closely to my own experience – though I don't have the camera save any JPGs, just RAWs. Sporting events tend to test these boundaries the most, as there's more to shoot and I fire more frames trying to get it.

I always have a fast 32gb card in the first slot, and will go onto the (either 32 or 128) second card usually after a little more than 1000 shots or so (this doesn't happen as much now, because I've become less of a sprayer over time). The second folder is a normal thing, though I'm honestly not entirely sure what triggers its creation. 🤔

Depending on the event, I'll usually go onto a second battery (of four Panasonic factory) a bit before the second card and can count on my fingers the number of times I've used a 3rd. Even that's mostly because I don't let it get close to empty before swapping. Can't imagine missing a shot because the battery died *shudders* so once I notice it on one bar, if I have a free moment it's getting swapped! If I'm covering something I suspect will be use lots of juice (or I'm just making a lot of vertical images) I'll usually be using the battery grip anyway.

I tend to switch my camera on and off a lot, unless it's just constant action, since I can turn it on as I raise the camera from my hip and it's ready to go almost immediately (developed this habit on the GX85 where the screen was on much more – I don't use the G9's screen a ton, mostly the EVF). Not sure how much battery life this saves, but I think being off takes less power? 🧐
 
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In the file system, I believe across manufacturers, a folder can only contain 1000 images, and after that it rolls over to a new folder, and the numbers continue upward. To infinity and beyond I suppose, or until the shutter wears out.
 

Michael Meissner

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CIPA sets a std. for comparison

but the CIPA ratings are:


G9 DMW-BLF19 (1860 mAH; 400 shots-CIPA)
GX-85 DMW-BLG10PP (930 mAh; 290 shots-CIPA)
GX9 DMW-BLG10E (930 mAH; 260 shots-CIPA)
GM-5 DMW-BLH7 (680 mAh; 220 shots-CIPA)
One of my gripes with the CIPA ratings is that if the camera has a flash built-in to the camera, the CIPA rules require that the flash be used on every other shot. Thus cameras that include a pop-up flash (GX-85, GX9) are penalized compared to cameras that do not have a built-in flash (G9). Granted the G9 batteries have bigger capacity than the other cameras, so you would expect a higher value.

It is presumably up to the camera manufacturer whether to test an external flash that ships with the camera (such as I believe GM5) whether to test the included flash in doing the CIPA ratings. But frankly, I can't imagine a manufacturer doing that since it would indicate a lower CIPA value.
 

sbm

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In the file system, I believe across manufacturers, a folder can only contain 1000 images, and after that it rolls over to a new folder, and the numbers continue upward. To infinity and beyond I suppose, or until the shutter wears out.
Probably for the best, but it always fascinates me when these sorts of seemingly arbitrary limits are set. Probably had a true technical reason at one point!
 

Michael Meissner

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Probably for the best, but it always fascinates me when these sorts of seemingly arbitrary limits are set. Probably had a true technical reason at one point!
The arbitrary limit is files must be named in the 8.3 naming system used in the Microsoft FAT32 file systems that are used in cards up to 32 gigabytes (above 32 gigabytes the exFat file system is used, but as far as I know the camera companies do not use a separate numbering for the larger cards). In the 8.3 system, you only have single case US letters and numbers (i.e. no European characters).

As to why the camera companies do not use the VFAT overlay on FAT32, I believe the reason is Microsoft holds a patent on VFAT, and demanded companies pay a royalty to use VFAT. So companies, decided to stay with just FAT32. Also, just about everything that handles SD cards handles FAT32.
 

Brownie

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I understand who rates them, I am trying to sort out how they come up with such a conservative number when the batteries are clearly capable of much more.

The first 800-ish photos were taken one at a time, usually not taking more than a handful before shutting the camera off. The last were taken at an air show, maybe 2-300 were bursts. Here too I shut the camera off between passes. I suspect it has a lot to do with the off-time of the camera, which is something I've done for years.

As for the card, this isn't the first time I've shot well over 1000. Anything from 1200-2000 is pretty normal at the drag strip. It is, however, the first time it's ever created a second file.
 

mawz

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The other thing you need to know about CIPA ratings is they take a shot every 30 seconds without sleeping.

The primary battery draw on mirrorless is running the display and sensor, the CIPA test is fairly close to worst case. Battery life is tied to camera active runtime, not images taken.

Divide the CIPA rating by 2 to get the typical aggregate runtime for the camera. (ie a 400 shot rating means you should get 200 minutes of runtime, or 3 hours and twenty minutes)
 

Darmok N Jalad

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Anyone know if they update the rating after firmware updates? Maybe the G9’s rating is from the 1.0 firmware, and successive releases have improved efficiencies. I know that doesn’t explain that big of a difference, but perhaps a contributor.

I will say that I never see that kind of battery performance, so maybe it has to do with your very concentrated usage, as opposed to lots of camera idle and on/off time. I probably get closer to the 400, as my behavior is way more like the latter, where I might have way more hours of on-off time than you just did during the event. I suspect the camera consumes a fair amount of juice just being “at the ready.”

I also noticed that the G9 appears to have 2 ”off” modes. When the camera has been powered off for some time, it enters a deeper sleep. However, if you turn it off and then back on a few minutes later, it appears to “ready” faster, suggesting some sort of intermediate sleep mode to save some power, but not all, to reduce waiting times. I spend a lot of time doing the latter when I go out with a camera as well.
 

ralf-11

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The other thing you need to know about CIPA ratings is they take a shot every 30 seconds without sleeping.

The primary battery draw on mirrorless is running the display and sensor, the CIPA test is fairly close to worst case. Battery life is tied to camera active runtime, not images taken.

Divide the CIPA rating by 2 to get the typical aggregate runtime for the camera. (ie a 400 shot rating means you should get 200 minutes of runtime, or 3 hours and twenty minutes)

do you mean running the sensor only when a pic is taken or something else, like a 'waiting for image capture' mode or sleep mode?
 

mawz

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do you mean running the sensor only when a pic is taken or something else, like a 'waiting for image capture' mode or sleep mode?

I mean the sensor is sending data. Which on a mirrorless camera is whenever you have the camera powered on and displaying on the EVF, LCD or HDMI out. Taking a picture doesn't add any significant power draw.

Sleep mode turns off the sensor and displays, which eliminates most of the power draw.
 

ralf-11

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You are saying that the sensor is "sending data" whenever the camera is not in sleep mode?

What data is being sent? and to where?
 

BosseBe

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If the screen or EVF on your camera is showing what the sensor sees the sensor is sending data to the screen or EVF.
If the screen and EVF is blank, no data is sent. The camera is in sleep mode or turned off!
Edit: Or you forgot to take the lens cap off! :whistling: /Edit.

If it is in sleep mode a full or half press of the shutter button will bring it to life again.
Using sleep mode saves a lot of battery as the screen and EVF draws a lot of current when active.
It should be possible to set the time before the camera goes into sleep mode. It is on the G80, and it gives a lot longer battery life.
RTM! Or should I say Read That Fine Manual? ;)
 

Darmok N Jalad

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I almost wonder if existing CIPA rating methodology might not be the best indicator of battery life for mirrorless cameras. On DSLRs, very little power is needed between shots due to optical pass-through, even if the camera is "on." With mirrorless, probably about the same amount of power is required as long as the camera is on and active, regardless of if you're taking a picture. I would almost expect mirrorless to behave more like a laptop or smartphone, where battery drain is tied to active display usage.
 
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There are so many variables in play. How long until your camera goes to sleep? Do you have IBIS and/or OIS running? Is your camera set to C-AF and working at focusing all the time? Do you have the proximity sensor on for your EVF and is it cycling on and off every time you move while it's over your shoulder?

When the camera is on, the drain is pretty close to when you're actively making photographs, even when it's just hanging around your neck or over your shoulder. Think of your camera more like a laptop and less like a DSLR when it comes to power consumption.
 
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