G7 - Using Higher ISO

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by Boatman, Jan 7, 2016.

  1. When I recently purchased a G7, my primary reason was to have a backup body to my aging GH2. There are many new benefits that the G7 brings to the party, but the one I wasn't really looking for but really appreciate is the G7's higher ISO abilities. With the GH2, I kept the ISO to 320 or below unless I really needed the light. With the G7 I'm finding that I can go to 3200 without much worry.

    This is a three stop improvement (over the GH2 base ISO of 160). The ability to increase shutter speed along with the improved manual focusing tools - PIP and peaking - got me thinking about trying out an old Takumar 300/f6.3 lens that I have. With the GH2 this lens was almost impossible to focus and always too slow for hand-held or even braced use.

    Attached are two screen shots from Lightroom comparing base ISO 200 to ISO 1600 and 3200. All of the shots are processed for noise and sharpened. Admittedly, the old Takumar is a soft lens, so these are not as crisp as you might expect. Still, at ISO 1600 there is essentially no loss of image quality and at 3200 it is minimal. That's a big bonus! All shots were taken with the camera braced, but not tripod mounted, using the electronic shutter.

    200-1600 Comp.JPG 200-3200 Comp.JPG
     
    • Appreciate Appreciate x 1
  2. Taurahe

    Taurahe Mu-43 Regular

    53
    Nov 24, 2015
    Brandon
    I have been very impressed by the High ISO performance of my g7. I bought it on a whim since I found an unbeatable deal but i have been carrying it every where I go. The overall IQ is fantastic, and with the noted high ISO performance , it really is a force to be reckoned with.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Listener

    Listener Mu-43 Regular

    I've found ISO 6400 to be useful too.
     
  4. With the G7, ISO 6400 is not bad but there is some IQ loss. I wouldn't want to use it for anything that I want to print big. However, for general shooting that winds up on 4x6 prints or web-only, it is completely acceptable. What I am appreciating is not the ability to shoot in really low light conditions, but the ability to shoot in bright situations at higher shutter speeds or shooting indoors, with flash, at much lower flash output. This advantage was not obvious to me until I tried it with the new camera.

    Of course with a Sony A7II or any of the high-end, full-frame SLRs, we'd be scoffing at ISO6400 and taking pictures in the dark. All good stuff but a much more serious investment and a whole different kit that I don't really want.
     
  5. Halaking

    Halaking Mu-43 Top Veteran

    667
    Dec 17, 2012
    Los Angeles
    Morris
    The G7 use Gx7's sensor, it's a nice upgrade from G6. But I still feel that noise level when shooting low-light is more than EM5 mark I in real world. Many Panasonic users state Panasonic bodies have best in low-light focus, but from my own test, my Olympus EM5 I and II actually did it better, Panasonic bodies focus slightly faster in day-light. Overall G7 has many Panasonic latest and newest innovation, it's very good buy for the price.

    I own EM5 I, II and G7 now, I also had GF3/GX1/Gx7 and E-PM2/EM10 before, my experience might be different than yours.
     
  6. JoFT

    JoFT Mu-43 Veteran

    360
    Nov 11, 2014
    Stuttgart
    Johannes
  7. It's been quiet here and I've been playing with my new G7 more than actually using it. The camera's ability to shoot at higher ISOs is quite impressive and I've been thinking about how I could use this in situations other than dim lighting - such as indoor sports where the lighting is reasonable but high shutter speed is needed. The attached photo compares ISO 200 to 25,600 in daylight. No, you wouldn't use this for a fine art landscape (probably wouldn't use a G7!) but the high ISO shot is a very usable image. The high ISO shot had both noise and sharpening adjusted in Lightroom. ISO 200-25600.JPG