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G5 Melting Point?

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by snegron, Nov 17, 2013.

  1. snegron

    snegron Mu-43 Regular

    166
    May 9, 2013
    SW Florida
    Just curious to know what is the maximum temperature a G5 can withstand before it malfunctions/deforms/starts to melt? I live in southern Florida where the temperature is always hot (except for maybe 3 days in January typically). I usually carry a small Panasonic TS3 and leave it in my car throughout the day. Never had any problems with it despite the hot temperatures reached inside my parked car throughout the day (the TS3 is an amazingly tough little camera).

    Lately the temperatures have been a bit cooler (mid 80's) bringing the inside temperature of my parked car to about 90. If I were to leave my G5 with kit lens in a Lowepro shoulder bag inside my parked vehicle, how hot would it have to get before the G5 gets damaged?

    I can't carry the G5 with me during my work day, however, I do have to go to my car sometimes to get a camera to take pics for different small projects I work on. I am hoping to bring along my G5 for that purpose (had no luck selling it, my kids don't want it so now it will hopefully replace my TS3 point & shoot as a daily snap-shooter).
     
  2. phigmov

    phigmov Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 4, 2010
    • Like Like x 1
  3. madogvelkor

    madogvelkor Mu-43 Top Veteran

    937
    Feb 22, 2013
    Connecticut
    There may be some wiggle room, if you want to risk it. I know on the low side I've used my G5 below 32 degrees. Though you are probably more likely to get electronics problems at high temperatures, including random shutdowns, more sensor noise, etc.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. STR

    STR Mu-43 Veteran

    222
    May 16, 2013
    I gotta laugh a bit about this. The G5 won't actually melt until you get it to a few hundred degrees + (the soldering will likely be the first to go, though there might be adhesives that give a bit before that). Cars don't get that hot. Realistically though, the battery will be considerably degraded with repeated exposure to high temperatures. Otherwise, so long as you're not USING the camera at those temperatures, it should be fine. If you insist on pushing the limit, then you'll be looking at increased sensor noise. If you start going outside the operational thermal limits, it will shut itself down to avoid user damage.
     
  5. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    If your work is air conditioned, can you just take the battery out with you to reduce the stress on it?
     
  6. snegron

    snegron Mu-43 Regular

    166
    May 9, 2013
    SW Florida
  7. snegron

    snegron Mu-43 Regular

    166
    May 9, 2013
    SW Florida
    Thanks! Interesting issue with more noise due to higher temperature.
     
  8. snegron

    snegron Mu-43 Regular

    166
    May 9, 2013
    SW Florida
    High temps in my car reach about 120 Fahrenheit during hot days. Problem is that the camera would be "baking" at that temperature for about 6 or 7 hours.
     
  9. snegron

    snegron Mu-43 Regular

    166
    May 9, 2013
    SW Florida
    Good point. I'm mostly concerned with the effects of the heat on the entire camera. I'm assuming that because the G5 and kit lens are stored in a closed, padded camera bag that the temperature might not be as hot as is in the rest of the car. Again, I'm just assuming as I have never really checked the temperature inside the bag; I have only checked the temperature on the seats of the car where they reach 120 Fahrenheit.
     
  10. STR

    STR Mu-43 Veteran

    222
    May 16, 2013
    You're not causing damage at that temp. You're not even pushing it that hard. Your battery might get that hot under sustained burst shooting at normal outside temps. And at 6 hours, the temp inside your car will be fairly even, the padding in your camera bag doesn't insulate THAT well.
     
  11. BigOwl

    BigOwl Mu-43 Regular

    61
    May 3, 2013
    San Antonio, Texas USA
    Al
    Last June, when I still had a G5, I took pictures at my granddaughter's high-school graduation in League City, TX, in an open stadium under a godawful direct sun in the middle of the day. The camera obviously got very warm, but performed flawlessly except the LCD got hazy looking and was hard to see. I was using the EVF for shooting, so the LCD was not a show-stopper and it did recover after we got out of the heat. All the images came out as expected and noise was not an issue since I was shooting a low ISO. I mention this just to make you aware that there may be temperature effects when you are operating in an extra-warm (or cold) environment.
     
  12. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    Environmental operating specifications are the minimum limits that the manufacturer states the camera will meet its specifications. The actual limits may be significantly past those limits with no obvious effects. They are not the limits that the camera dies at if you go past them. Prolonged operation at elevated temperatures will shorten the life of electronic devices.
     
  13. rollbread

    rollbread Mu-43 Rookie

    13
    Jan 4, 2013
    The G5 or any other cameras will not melt even when directly placed under the sun. Most probably you might melt first before the camera. :tongue:

    If you are not using the camera in such high temperature, it won't cause much harm to it. But if you are using it in a very high temperature, the camera might overheat and switch off itself, after cooling down it should be back to normal. Only electronics like mobile phones might overheat and explode when charging off wall socket, it shouldn't happen to cameras that runs off battery.
     
  14. tjdean01

    tjdean01 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    842
    Feb 20, 2013
    Won't the grease in the lens start to run onto the aperture blades if left in direct sunlight?
     
  15. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    Doubt it. These lenses don't have metal on metal focusing helicoids that require lubrication, and the industry has long ago switched over to synthetic lubricants that won't break down at higher temperatures.
     
  16. DynaSport

    DynaSport Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 5, 2013
    Dan
    I live in central Florida and often leave my camera in the car. Currently my G5, previously my Canon gear. Up to now I have never had any heat related issues with any of my cameras or lenses.
     
  17. snegron

    snegron Mu-43 Regular

    166
    May 9, 2013
    SW Florida

    Lucky you! I live in SW Florida where the heat/humidity are brutal!
     
  18. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    The mention of increase noise at higher temperatures is very real. Early broadcast cameras used pelt ire coolers on the blue image sensor, to decrease noise. It's also another reason why light colored cameras may have slightly less noise than black bodies .... Something to think about!
     
  19. DynaSport

    DynaSport Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 5, 2013
    Dan
    I wouldn't exactly call the Tampa Bay area a cool/low humidity area.