1. Reminder: Please use our affiliate links for holiday shopping!

G5 -- focusing technique, etc.

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by Desert_B, Jul 9, 2013.

  1. Desert_B

    Desert_B Mu-43 Regular

    102
    Jul 8, 2013
    Minnesota, U.S.A.
    Coming from a Canon Rebel XSi, I'm accustomed to selecting a focus point, then doing "focus and recompose" as necessary (esp. for portraits). (Not so much CENTER point focus and recompose, since I realized the problems that can cause with large apertures.)

    So, as a new owner of the G5, I'm trying to figure out how to translate my DSLR skills, especially when I'm using the EVF (a necessity at times).

    Using my finger on the LCD to select a focus area is all right at times, but I find it awkward to do exactly what I need to do, and sometimes my finger doesn't reach far enough.

    What focusing technique/s do YOU use?
     
  2. Hagane

    Hagane Mu-43 Regular

    88
    May 31, 2013
    Limburg, Netherlands
    Hi,
    on my G5 I've just set one small focus point in the center and use focus and recomposing.
    DOF with m43 is deeper, so this technique is somewhat easier with the G5 than with a DSLR.

    When shooting closeups with a wide aperture (e.g. the 75 or 45mm at f1.8) I use the touch focus feature of the G5.
     
  3. Harry 1999

    Harry 1999 New to Mu-43

    1
    Jul 12, 2013
    I use the G5 and a Leica/Panasonic 45mm F2.8 lens mounted on a tripod to take shots of flowers in ambient light. After composing the shot I press the AF/AE button which is set to A/F Hold to give me a rough auto focus position. I then turn the manual focus ring on the lens to fine tune the selective nature of the focus and capture the shot. My experience so far has been that both the small and largest focus boxes provide the best focus points for these types of shots. This hybrid method of focus is faster than just regular manual focus and has been working out well for me so far.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. entropicremnants

    entropicremnants Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jul 16, 2012
    John Griggs
    I fold the display out to the side, facing towards me, and use my thumb. Works a treat for me and it's part of what makes the G5 fantastic for me. I can nail any focus point almost instantly.

    And I use the smallest focus box, but not the tiny point focus cross for almost everything.
     
  5. Kiwi Paul

    Kiwi Paul Mu-43 Top Veteran

    729
    Aug 15, 2011
    Aberdeen Scotland
    I typically have it set to 23 area mode and when I want to select a portion of the screen have the Fn2 button set to change the focus to 5 area mode, the boxes can then be moved around the screen by the thumb wheel or pad. To recentre it just press the Fn2 button again and to turn it off back to 23 area mode press OK button. If I want to use single point mode I select focus options by pressing the LH pad button, select single point then move the point about with the pad, the size is changed with the thumb wheel, it can berecentred anytime by pressing the Fn2 button.

    Paul
     
  6. entropicremnants

    entropicremnants Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jul 16, 2012
    John Griggs
    That's all very well but you might as well be using a DSLR. The touch screen is WAY faster for getting to a specific point of focus.

    You're using the G5 like any other camera and not leveraging a very key feature that makes selecting the subject for autofocus the fastest it can be without the camera reading your mind, lol. And you are not limited to 23 locations -- you can use any point on the screen.

    I used to use my D7000 like you use the G5 and it's much slower that way.

    But if you don't need quick selection in the moment, hitting all those buttons doesn't matter much I agree.
     
  7. Desert_B

    Desert_B Mu-43 Regular

    102
    Jul 8, 2013
    Minnesota, U.S.A.
    Thank you for your replies.

    I can see I still have a lot to learn about the G5, and I need a lot of practice!
     
  8. entropicremnants

    entropicremnants Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jul 16, 2012
    John Griggs
    As you've heard, it is capable of numerous modes of operation, but with that "freedom" comes "responsibility" -- mainly figuring out the byzantine menu structure, lol.

    If you have questions ask as I've gotten pretty good in the menus overall.
     
  9. arbutusq

    arbutusq Mu-43 Regular

    34
    Aug 10, 2011
    I found the G5 focussing to be far harder to master than for any other camera to use because it necessitates a different approach due to its touch screen, but I love it now that I can use it. 23 area for general use, pinpoint touch AF for tricky ones.
     
  10. Desert_B

    Desert_B Mu-43 Regular

    102
    Jul 8, 2013
    Minnesota, U.S.A.
    Interesting, to me, that you would find the G5 focusing hard to master. My first few days with the G5, I feared I had made a big mistake (or that I was exceptionally slow to learn).
     
  11. arbutusq

    arbutusq Mu-43 Regular

    34
    Aug 10, 2011
    I should clarify my comments a bit. In general use the G5 focussing is pretty intuitive, but it took a while to master the pinpoint focus and other focus modes with moving subjects and busy backgrounds. Once I had figured it out I had no problems.
     
  12. MarylandUSA

    MarylandUSA Mu-43 Regular

    185
    Jul 3, 2013
    Poolesville, Maryland
    Paul Franklin Stregevsky
    For the farsighted, the electronic viewfinder might work better

    I own a G3, not a G5. I use the EVF exclusively because I've set its diopter to let me see without reading glasses. I can't do that with the LCD.
     
  13. BillW

    BillW Mu-43 Regular

    93
    Oct 22, 2012
    Scranton, PA
    Since most of my shots are people shots, I keep the camera in face detection mode, and use the touch screen as needed.

    FWIW, I used to shoot with a 5D, and find the G5 lightyears ahead. My 5d seems like an antique compared to the G5.
     
  14. Desert_B

    Desert_B Mu-43 Regular

    102
    Jul 8, 2013
    Minnesota, U.S.A.
    Still getting accustomed to the G5.... but I have found that face detection mode (for people shots, obviously) works very well. I've gotten some candid portraits that I'm very happy with, and truthfully I feel a little guilty, as if it should be harder to get such a good portrait.