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G3 Question - 7-14 and Flash

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by Hillshot, Jul 1, 2013.

  1. Hillshot

    Hillshot Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Jun 28, 2012
    Herefordshire
    Philip Jones
    I use my G3 with a 14-45 zoom for my work in real estate selling farms. It has produced great results for brochure shots on externals of farm houses and land.

    I now want to include internal shots of properties using a 7-14 lens. My question is whether there is a flash for the G3 that will work well with this lens? Often these old houses are poorly lit with low ceilings. I know there is often a maximum wide angle with flas units. Any ideas?

    Phil
     
  2. chasm

    chasm Mu-43 Veteran

    262
    Mar 2, 2010
    I'm also researching flash units at the moment, albeit not with your specific requirements. I did see that someone found the Nissin Di466 to work well with his Olympus 9-18 lens at its widest setting, providing the supplied adaptor was used.
     
  3. elavon

    elavon Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 1, 2012
    Tel Aviv Israel
    Ehud
    With such wide lens it will be hard to get uniform flash. You might consider using a tripod and a slow shutter speed for getting nice lit shots.
    You may also try to bounce the flash from ceiling, or a back white wall if possible, but in any case it will be tricky.
    Other solution that can work, but it is more complicated is to use several radio triggered flashes.
    Here is a small article about interior shooting

    How to Photograph Interiors and Real Estate
     
  4. woof

    woof Mu-43 Top Veteran

    511
    Oct 18, 2011
    The present.
    +1 This is how I shoot all my interiors.
     
  5. BillW

    BillW Mu-43 Regular

    93
    Oct 22, 2012
    Scranton, PA
    With a super-wide-angle lens, your best bet is to bounce the light behind you, over your shoulder, up into the corner of a room. BUT, you're going to need some power from your flash.

    The Nissin flash will not swivel...only bounce.

    Another option is to use a diffuser like a Sto-Fen, Lightsphere or the like.

    A combination of ambient light with some fill flash may suit you well, provided you white-balance for both. If the room is tungsten, then gel your flash with a CTO gel and set your white balance accordingly to tungsten. Things will look much cleaner.
     
  6. rnagoda

    rnagoda Mu-43 Veteran

    260
    Jun 12, 2012
    Tucson, AZ
    Robert
    The long-exposure trick should work very well and give you the most control over the end result.

    If that's not an option for you for some reason, and the room is not huge, you should be fine using a good flash (I use the Yongnuo 560 YN-560 II) and a diffuser.

    Regarding diffusers, I've been very happy with my Gary Fong Lightsphere, but I do feel like I spent $60 or so on what amounts to a flash mounted piece of tupperware and will be DIY-ing my next diffuser. I would avoid the super-cheap ones that are just plastic box covers for the flash ... they don't do the job you want them to do
     
  7. Hillshot

    Hillshot Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Jun 28, 2012
    Herefordshire
    Philip Jones
    Thanks everybody, this is really useful.

    I am liking the idea of
    using a rooms existing lighting and using a tripod for long exposure. I suppose timer delay would help to keep things sharp.

    Phil
     
  8. elavon

    elavon Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 1, 2012
    Tel Aviv Israel
    Ehud
  9. inkista

    inkista Mu-43 Veteran

    332
    Jan 13, 2012
    San Diego, CA
    Uh... That's Ken Rockwell. He's got minimal knowledge when it comes to off-camera lighting. I'd go with the Strobist and his recommendations: Scott Hargis, and http://photographyforrealestate.net/ (and their Flickr group).

    Strobist: One-Light Real Estate Photography
    Strobist: Lighting Inside the Box
    http://scotthargisphoto.wordpress.com/
    http://photographyforrealestate.net...ghting-with-multiple-strobes-by-scott-hargis/
    http://photographyforrealestate.net/
    http://www.flickr.com/groups/photographyforrealestate/

    The off-camera lighting will probably get you the most professional results but will definitely be the most costly, time-consuming, and hardest to learn. Long exposure on a tripod is probably a better solution, and then maybe adding one off-camera light when you really need it.
     
  10. inkista

    inkista Mu-43 Veteran

    332
    Jan 13, 2012
    San Diego, CA
    Ah. The Strobist article I was trying to find, but couldn't. This is when David Hobby had to put his own house up for sale. :) He gave us all the details on how he lit his real estate photos.

    Strobist: Working Around the House
     
  11. woof

    woof Mu-43 Top Veteran

    511
    Oct 18, 2011
    The present.

    I want to add something that absolutely killed me at one point. Wonderful interior of a large basement done as an Adirondack camp. Beautiful detailed dark wood with wainscotting type ceilings and a stone fireplace. Deer antler sconces, etc. Wonderful. Great detail, perfectly executed. I grew up summering in a camp. This palce was generally a perfect Adirondack "impression." Right down to balsam sachets lending the right smell to it.

    There was a big picture window in all three of the main rooms. Anyone guess the color cast I got?







    Green. From reflection of the sun on the grass. Very hard to correct, hard to remove in post. It manifested unevenly and was not really all that visible when I was shooting. Chimping the results on a (then) 2" screen did not alert me much either.

    I started taking to bringing a few old white sheets to lay under the windows where the sun would reflect the color of the lawn (or whatever - I've seen reds off of mulch too) up into the room. Cheap fix, and it works. I would not leave home without about six or so kings. They tend to reflect additional white light up into the scene as well. Heh.

    I'm sure others have a fix for this as well. Just be aware.

    woof
     
  12. matthewm

    matthewm Mu-43 Rookie

    19
    Apr 14, 2009
    Sumter, SC
    Matthew
    A couple of years ago, I was hired to shoot about 250 homes for a high end resort in Charleston, SC. Originally, the shoot was supposed to only be for about 80 homes, maximum, so I had planned to use a combination of several off-camera flashes to light the rooms. When I found that I would be shooting 250 homes, my attitude changed. It changed even more when they informed me that I would be shooting as many as 10 homes in a day depending on their availability (they were rental properties and I could only shoot them between vacationers).

    Anyway, I quickly realized that multiple flashes wouldn't be feasible given the time constraints (3-7 bedrooms, 2-4 bathrooms, living spaces, etc.) so I went the route of using a camera on a tripod with long exposures and small apertures (f/8, f/11, f/16). I also tried to expose for the rooms and let the windows do what they would do. If they were completely blown out or bleeding into the frame too much, I would take a second shot exposing for the windows and fix them in post. For the most part, though, I just let the windows blow out. It actually gave the image a really bright, clean look. With subtle processing, I was able to turn out images extremely quickly.

    It should be noted that I used a 2-second timer to keep from having camera shake visible in my photos.

    Unless you've got the time and resources, shooting with 5 strobes in a kitchen is going to be problematic, tedious and will most likely create more issues than it's worth.

    Hope this is helpful.