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G2 "Constant Focus" feature

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by CCRoo, Mar 21, 2012.

  1. CCRoo

    CCRoo Mu-43 Regular

    86
    Mar 22, 2011
    Does the Panasonic G2 have the "constant preview" feature? I read a review that says it does, but I cannot find it. I suspect this function starts with the GH2.

    I want to find a way to use the G2 manually with legacy lenses without having the VF2 and LCD screen automatically brighten in dark situations. I think "constant preview" does this. How does one achieve this with the G2 if the feature isn't available?

    Thanks!
     
  2. shnitz

    shnitz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    989
    Aug 25, 2011
    Austin, TX
    What does "constant focus" refer to, and since our cameras don't interact with the adapted lens in any way, how would there be a feature with the name "focus" in the title that works with adapted lenses?

    I just searched my digital copy of my g2 manual, and the only incidence of the word "constant" refers to using the timer with the flash on.
     
  3. shnitz

    shnitz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    989
    Aug 25, 2011
    Austin, TX
    I just saw that you edited your post to say "constant preview." That's a different ballgame. To achieve this, there is no setting on our G2 to always have it on, but you can always do it by:
    -press the DOF preview button (indicated by the aperture/trash can, on the bottom right)
    -follow the on-screen instructions and press "display" to turn on the shutter speed effect
     
  4. CCRoo

    CCRoo Mu-43 Regular

    86
    Mar 22, 2011
    Ah, that's what I thought. Too bad!
     
  5. shnitz

    shnitz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    989
    Aug 25, 2011
    Austin, TX
    Really, it's a pretty quick two button presses. Not an ideal solution, but it's not a hard habit to get in to.
     
  6. CCRoo

    CCRoo Mu-43 Regular

    86
    Mar 22, 2011
    That's true. A little practice could do the trick.

    Here's another little question for a fellow G2 user -- does Exposure Lock work in manual (M) mode? I love using the light meter function but I can't seem to get Exposure lock to work in that mode.
     
  7. shnitz

    shnitz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    989
    Aug 25, 2011
    Austin, TX
    I don't think there's a point for exposure lock in manual mode? Since exposure is based on shutter speed and aperture, just adjust those two when the camera is pointed in whatever direction you want the exposure to be determined at. Then, no matter where you move the camera, exposure won't change, since you're in manual mode.
     
  8. CCRoo

    CCRoo Mu-43 Regular

    86
    Mar 22, 2011
    Oh course, that makes sense... but when I recompose what I see in the viewfinder changes dramatically, particularly with spot metering.

    In manual mode with a legacy lens, I can set an aperture on the lens and use the light meter in the camera to find an appropriate shutter speed, right? I think that's how i would like to shoot. Am I totally misunderstanding manual mode or is this possible?
     
  9. shnitz

    shnitz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    989
    Aug 25, 2011
    Austin, TX
    With our Panasonic cameras, while the viewfinder changes brightness, it is not a 100% accurate representation of the final photo. Plus, I've found that with adapted lenses, the meter accuracy changes depending on the lighting. Your best bet is to turn on the histogram to check the brightness accuracy of the photo before you take it. If you're in manual mode, and you see the viewfinder changing brightness, then it doesn't necessarily mean that the final photo will be changing brightness as well.

    Here are how the various modes work with normal lenses first:
    1. Program - The camera uses the meter to choose both a shutter speed and an aperture.
    2. Shutter speed mode - You set the shutter speed, and the camera will use the meter to automatically set the correct aperture.
    3. Aperture priority -You set the aperture, and the camera will use the meter to automatically set the correct shutter speed.
    4. Manual - You set both the aperture and the shutter speed. The meter will tell you if your combination of settings if correctly exposed, and if not then it will tell you to what extent the combination is overexposed or underexposed.

    In the first 3 modes, to change the brightness of the photo, you can adjust the exposure compensation. This tells the camera to deliberately offset the output of the photo from the "correct" metering for whatever reason.

    Now, with an adapted lens, the camera can't control the aperture, so it's up to you. When you adjust the aperture, it will still affect the camera's meter, so the camera will realize when you stop down from f/2.8 to f/4, for example, and are therefore letting in half as much light. Pretty nice advantage of mirrorless cameras. So, going back to the control modes of the camera:
    1. Program mode - Since the camera can't adjust the aperture, this is like using aperture priority mode with a normal lens.
    2. Shutter priority - The camera can't adjust the aperture, so you end up adjusting both the shutter speed and aperture. This makes it work like manual mode with a normal lens.
    3. Aperture priorty - You adjust the aperture, like normal. The camera will control the shutter speed to get the correct exposure.
    4. Manual mode - This works just like with a normal lens. Obviously you have to adjust the aperture manually. You also have to adjust the shutter speed, and the meter will tell you how underexposed or overexposed you are.
     
  10. CCRoo

    CCRoo Mu-43 Regular

    86
    Mar 22, 2011
    Wow, thank you! That is a great and super clear explanation.

    When using the histogram, is it wise to spread the curve across the range even if the subject has very little contrast and is in moderate light? If I did, would I darken the brightness in Aperture to make it look more like what I saw when I took the photo?
     
  11. CCRoo

    CCRoo Mu-43 Regular

    86
    Mar 22, 2011
    Wow, thank you! That is a great and super clear explanation.

    When using the histogram, is it wise to spread the curve across the range even if the subject has very little contrast and is in moderate light? If I did, would I darken the brightness in Aperture to make it look more like what I saw when I took the photo?