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Future Implications of Sync IS

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by Lcrunyon, Jan 12, 2016.

  1. Lcrunyon

    Lcrunyon Mu-43 Top Veteran

    758
    Jun 4, 2014
    Maryland
    Loren
    I've gotten to thinking about what direction Olympus might take with the new Sync IS technology. Because the roadmap suggests that many of the camera bodies will eventually be getting the firmware update, I expect that they intend to roll out more lenses with OIS in the future.

    I wonder if they will implement it with the new f/1.2 primes, which would make them even more costly and heavy than we were perhaps thinking. On the one hand, the fast primes will be able to hit higher shutter speeds and wouldn't need it so much. On the other hand, it would make for some unique opportunities.

    For example, I don't imagine that IBIS would work with Hi Rez mode, because they both require controlling the movement of the sensor. However, OIS would at least be able to provide some stabilization, adding to the ability to shoot hand-held. I am sure higher shutter speeds would also help, and together (along with any other improvements along the way we have been anticipating) maybe this will be a way to enhance the usability of Hi Rez. They might have to do a fw upgrade to allow OIS to kick in independently when Hi Rez is used.

    One thing I expect would make sense for Oly (but would suck for me) is to make Mk II versions of some of the Pro zoom lenses with OIS built in. Or, maybe Oly will only put OIS in completely new lenses that would benefit most from it. Maybe a Pro macro lens would be in order?

    Thoughts?
     
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  2. mcasan

    mcasan Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 26, 2014
    Atlanta
    The longer the focal length and the smaller the aperture, the greater the need for better IS. I think a pancake 1.x lens would not be in real need of the OIS side if the body already had IBIS. If there will a 40-150 II, it could use OIS and thus be the second Synch IS lens.
     
  3. Turbofrog

    Turbofrog Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 21, 2014
    I'm not sure if adding OIS to lenses inherently makes them more expensive, or whether it simply represents a "value add" that lets the company charge more. To wit, the humble Panasonic 14-42mm II kit lens has OIS, is obviously incredibly cheap to make, and is optically pretty good. Likewise, the 42.5/1.7 is not appreciably heavier or more expensive than the Olympus 45/1.8, despite the inclusion of OIS.

    I think that your thoughts on Dual IS and compatibility with some future hand-held high res mode are very interesting, though. Could be a direction they're looking at.

    That said, I'm still deeply, deeply skeptical of handheld High Res mode, at least one that doesn't still have significant caveats. The current system takes ~1 second to make 8 frames, which is about in line with an 8 fps burst output. When coupled with an excellent OIS system, 1/15s is probably the lowest that someone could reasonably consider handheld if you wanted flawless performance with no artifacting (depending on the focal length, obviously). Even that would require 15x faster readout, so 120 fps.

    Then again, maybe it's not totally insane. After all, the Nikon V3 can shoot 60 fps with the focus locked, and that's with 18.4MP (albeit reading from a smaller sensor). Though again my enthusiasm is tempered, since the rumoured Sony IMX269 sensor that appears to be destined for the new Olympus cams only promises 27 fps. So who knows, it's all a big question mark!
     
  4. eteless

    eteless Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2014
    It costs more (especially for Olympus) as they have to license patents which they do not own, the cost for Canon is minimal compared to other companies on the other hand.
     
  5. Lcrunyon

    Lcrunyon Mu-43 Top Veteran

    758
    Jun 4, 2014
    Maryland
    Loren
    I guess it will be a decision they have to make as to whether they will continue to put out all the stops on their lenses (like the Pro line) or go back to making some that are less expensive, and which sort they will be putting OIS on. I do think it will raise the cost, but they may choose to cut the price down in other ways.

    I do agree with many of you though in that not every lens is going to benefit enough from OIS to make it worthwhile. I would also have suggested wide angle lenses as such, except for that Hi Rez speculation of mine.
     
  6. eteless

    eteless Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2014
    Remember the additional cost of lens size, with a larger telephoto this is mostly determined by focal length however with shorter focal lengths adding OIS has a size penalty which can't be ignored. It's very easy to add it to a kit lens however with a fast prime the size cost can be very high.
     
  7. Turbofrog

    Turbofrog Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 21, 2014
    Again, I'd point to the Panasonic 42.5/1.7, the Canon 35/2 IS or the Sony 35/1.8 or 50/1.8 OSS. All are fast primes that are relatively compact and affordable in their class.

    The Nocticron is obviously the outlier, but it's not at all clear that it's because of OIS. The Fuji 16-55/2.8 is one of the largest, heaviest, and most expensive lenses in its class, and it doesn't have any OIS.
     
  8. mcasan

    mcasan Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 26, 2014
    Atlanta
    But none of those 3rd party lens can do the theme of the thread....Synch IS. So far the only lens doing Synch IS with an Olympus body is the 300 Pro. It remains to be seen if Olympus will put IS into future lenses. I will be very surprised to see a 3rd party lens doing Synch IS with an Olympus body, with to without an adapter.
     
  9. Turbofrog

    Turbofrog Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 21, 2014
    Oh, absolutely that's true. But I'm just saying that there's no demonstrable evidence to suggest that adding IS to a fast prime inherently comes with a substantial size, weight, or price penalty.
     
  10. bikerhiker

    bikerhiker Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 24, 2013
    Canada
    David
    I have the same line of thought along with you that, it is not conceivable in the near future that Olympus may release updated lenses with OIS probably to accommodate handheld Hi-Res or even handheld 4 shot for better color accuracy and noise control while shifting the stability responsibility to OIS on the lens side. But you can do this already with Panasonic OIS capable lenses providing 4K stability with GX8 in 4K mode so the new lenses have to be faster and more unique than what it is replacing.

    Will it add to the size of the lens? I generally don't think so at least for prime lenses. Take a look at the Panasonic 42.5 1.7 with OIS. Not any larger than 45 1.8, but I like the one with OIS because then I could shoot handheld Hi-Res (once it's possible) with some stability.
     
  11. Lcrunyon

    Lcrunyon Mu-43 Top Veteran

    758
    Jun 4, 2014
    Maryland
    Loren
    Olympus' lens department has to keep designing new lenses to keep making money (of course), so it's inevitable that there will be new versions to tempt us eventually. I am curious what direction they will go after the fast primes come out. Perhaps with a few exceptions, we will see a lot more redundancy in future releases, with only incremental changes from existing models that may at times include Sync IS. I expect those would include another portrait lens among the fast primes, another telephoto prime (somewhere between 100 and 200), and another macro lens (not fast, obviously).

    Night/indoor shooting with an f/1.2 prime with Sync IS would be pretty potent, as long as there is little to no subject movement. OIS would make those lenses more attractive to Panny shooters as well.

    One other implication I was curious about is potentially less battery life. I don't know details of how OIS works, but I would assume this would have at least some cost.
     
  12. bikerhiker

    bikerhiker Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 24, 2013
    Canada
    David
    The new 75mm f/1.2 will be potent if it includes IS. :)