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Fuji X100 Reviewed at DPReview

Discussion in 'Micro 4/3 News and Rumors' started by flash, May 16, 2011.

  1. flash

    flash Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 29, 2010
    1 hour from Sydney Australia.
    Gordon
    • Like Like x 2
  2. Alanroseman

    Alanroseman Super Moderator Emeritus

    Dec 21, 2010
    New England
    Just read the review.....

    Thanks for the link.. Hmmmmmmm.
     
  3. ~tc~

    ~tc~ Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 22, 2010
    Houston, TX
    Wow ... How you say "less than favorable"
     
  4. Roark

    Roark Mu-43 Regular

    54
    Feb 10, 2011
    Boston, MA
    The image quality doesn't seem up to par compared to the EPL-2. When comparing the two shots on the Martini and Rossi emblem, the EPL-2 comes out sharper. I don't understand why it wouldn't, since the Olympus has a smaller sensor. Am I the only one who thinks this or is my own personal bias just playing tricks on me? Seems the only advantage it has is the ability to deal with noise at a higher ISO than the EPL-2.
     
  5. phigmov

    phigmov Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 4, 2010
    its odd though - I read the G3 preview on DPReview and looked at an ISO1600 pic comparing the G1/2/3, X100 and EPL2 and thought the Oly fared best. The others all looked to have more noise - a little sharper but much noisier.

    Odd considering X100 and G2/3 have better sensors.

    I'll have to pop over and peep at pixels some more :)
     
  6. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs Super Moderator

    Apr 17, 2010
    Near Philadephila
    If you shoot with it a while, you'll see some very real differences between it and any m43 camera to date - I have a GH2 and the X100 produces better results. Not enough to matter in the real world (except in low light, where its pretty amazing), but if you look at 100% crops as a hobby, there's no denying it. I can crop X100 files in ways I never would with my m43 cams, which is about the only real world application where it matters.

    The quirks are very real. My learning curve and "getting comfortable" curve were much longer and steeper with the X100 than with any other camera I've ever owned, but I can't stop shooting with it now that I've got it sussed. It really is a tremendous amount of fun to shoot with. Now, if they'd just get the ISO menus worked out...

    -Ray
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. playak47

    playak47 Mu-43 Veteran

    297
    Nov 4, 2010
    I am still a novice in photography but I think the pictures of X100 look amazing in low light or high ISO. :43: already was pretty comparable to entry level DSLRs with low ISO picture quality anyway. But on the other hand :43: might be quicker than X100 in handling of files and focusing. So it still not possible to "have your cake and eat it too".

    Since X100 has APC-S sensor it will still have the edge over :43:. I think low light performance is really a must if you take a lot of pictures in social setting.

    There are two things that :43: needs to improve: fast focusing and low light performance. If these goals are met than :43: success is guaranteed.

    P.S. I have E-PL1 and for me those two limitations are my main concern.
     
  8. Djarum

    Djarum Super Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    Huntsville, AL, USA
    Jason
    Ray,

    I'm curious exactly how the images are better? Are you shooting RAW? I've seen a fair amount of samples, both JPEG and RAW of the X100, and the high ISO shots look great, but 800 on down just don't seem to have that "pop" the E-Pl2 has. I will say that the X100 on average does have a stop or better dynamic range. As I mentioned on the other site, I wonder if it is due to the weak AA filter Oly has or lack of in camera sharpening of the JPEGs.
     
  9. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs Super Moderator

    Apr 17, 2010
    Near Philadephila
    I'm not really sure exactly what I mean Jason. I'm the farthest thing from a pixel peeper generally, but I'm always looking at 100% crops from the X100 because they look so damn GOOD! I've only had this reaction with one other camera - a Sony A33 mated with a Zeiss 16-80 zoom. Its when the details of far away twigs on trees still look sharp and you go 100% and you can see all of the details. I'm mostly shooting with jpegs so far, but have started to experiment with raw now that I realized I could convert the raw files to DNG and open them with Aperture. Either way I'm having the same reaction. The Sony blew my mind but I hated shooting with it so I kept it all of three days or so. The Fuji blows my mind and I love shooting more with it than anything else I own. And I really really really like my GF1 and Nex a lot and like the LX5 and GH2 well enough.

    Now, I'm not saying it really matters for the way I look at photos in the actual world or the way most of us do. In that sense, ANY of the cameras we talk about around here and on Serious Compacts are quite good enough IMHO. Although when I occasionally feel like cropping a photo, I feel like I can literally go right up to 100% with the X100 at reasonable ISOs. And, yes, at high ISO it really shines. For the most part and for most of us, its just a meaningless exercise in pixel-peeping (no offense to those who do this stuff professionally and HAVE TO pixel peep!).

    I'm not looking at test charts and shooting brick walls. Its just something that's popped out at me exactly twice and the X100 is one of those.

    -Ray
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. stanleyk

    stanleyk Guest

    99
    May 26, 2010
    Ray,

    I have one on pre-order and will probably be waiting a while I guess. I have two questions:

    1) I read where you can actually use F2.0 at faster shutter speeds in Manual Exposure mode. Is this correct?

    2) If so is the camera metering correctly?

    Thanks!
     
  11. Djarum

    Djarum Super Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    Huntsville, AL, USA
    Jason

    Ray,

    Thanks for the explaination. I'm glad you really like the camera. I think people like this camera on an emotional level, and there is nothing wrong with that. That eventually will fade and the camera still has to perform, IMHO. I guess, on average from what I've seen from just a PQ standpoint, is that I don't see any obvious advantage from a m43 camera up to ISO 800 or even 1600. Past that, the PQ becomes obviously better with the X100.
     
  12. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs Super Moderator

    Apr 17, 2010
    Near Philadephila
    As I said, for real world viewing, I don't think there's enough difference to matter at lower ISOs, although there is in lower light. But as you say, its gotta perform, and that's exactly what I love about it. Not so much in the sense of IQ - I have yet to be DIS-satisfied with the IQ of any of my cameras. But for me its about getting the shot. And both the Nex and the X100 have features that make this easier for me than any other cameras I've used. This mostly regards street shooting - for more general shooting I can do about the same things with any of my cameras. For sports shooting, the GH2 is the choice (but I do almost none of this). For general vacation shooting, I'd probably take the GH2 or GF1 and a few lenses if I didn't plan on doing some street shooting as well. But I think this goes well beyond liking the camera at "an emotional level". It WORKS. It takes a little longer to figure out HOW it works than with some cameras, but once you figure it out, its pretty awesome.

    -Ray
     
  13. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs Super Moderator

    Apr 17, 2010
    Near Philadephila
    I wasn't aware of this, but it appears you can and it does. I'm not in a position to test this thoroughly, but I just stuck it in manual mode and shot a fairly bright scene at f2.2 and 1/4000. Meter showed it at the right level and the shot looks OK on the screen. The 1/4000 was lit up in red before I shot, I suppose telling me not to do that. But it appears it shot it at that speed anyway. So, I don't know if there are hidden problems here or if its not REALLY shooting it that way, but it appears to. Might be a good question on DPreview where there are a lot more users.

    -Ray
     
  14. stanleyk

    stanleyk Guest

    99
    May 26, 2010
    Thanks for checking that. I had read on Steve Huff's blog that you could acutally use a faster shutter in manual mode.
     
  15. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs Super Moderator

    Apr 17, 2010
    Near Philadephila
    Check out the discussion of this toward the bottom of this page in the DPR review of the camera:

    Fujifilm FinePix X100 Review: 17. Photographic tests: Digital Photography Review

    You can do it, but the shutter can't move fast enough to cover (or uncover) the entire large aperture at these speeds, so there's some interference from the shutter. They illustrate it quite well - better than I could see it on the rear screen in my quick and dirty test, above.

    -Ray
     
  16. Roark

    Roark Mu-43 Regular

    54
    Feb 10, 2011
    Boston, MA
    Ray, I was looking into this camera as a way to get a feel for using film cameras but still be using digital. I'm not trying to say the vintage look is what is compelling me to look into it (even though it is dang sexy) but it seems to me that the position of the dials and the function seems to be very close to an old school Minolta. What are your thoughts on the operation of the camera?
     
  17. stanleyk

    stanleyk Guest

    99
    May 26, 2010
    That makes complete sense. Thanks!!

    One more question, do you find the built in neutral density filters useful for situations where you would like to use a wider aperture?

    Sorry to keep bothering you!!!
     
  18. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs Super Moderator

    Apr 17, 2010
    Near Philadephila
    Yeah, the ND filter is there specifically BECAUSE of the inability of the shutter to clear the larger aperture fast enough in those situations. The only problem with it is its a PIA to get to unless you put it on the FN button. This camera can really use one or two more programmable buttons so that there's more than just one adjustment you can find on the fly. I find that every shoot I have to decide what I want to be able to control with that. Sometimes I set it for ISO, sometimes for ND, sometimes for film type (although with raw support just coming online yesterday for Aperture, I may not bother with that much more). But if I'm going out on a really bright day, I will sometimes put the ND filter on there, more for using slow shutter speeds if I'm going for a bit of motion blur in my street work than large aperture stuff, but sometimes for that too. It definitely works.

    -Ray
     
  19. drd1135

    drd1135 Zen Snapshooter

    Mar 17, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Steve
    Sounds to me like a nice camera if you want to spend the money. If not, there's always a micro 43 dovebar and the Panny 20 or Oly 17. It's a bit of a niche camera in that only serious photographers will really appreciate it and can work around the quirks. I think DPreview is right to discourage those with more money than skill from thinking that this is their personal photographic Nirvana. Of course, if I had a grand or so lying around I'd get one ;-)
     
  20. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs Super Moderator

    Apr 17, 2010
    Near Philadephila
    Sorry, I missed this question last night.

    Clearly the control layout is based on the classic film cameras, with aperture on the lens and shutter speed, exposure comp, and ISO on dials on the top of the body. I liked it back then and I like it now, but I can't say I mind the way most modern digital cams are laid out. I've been very happy controlling my panasonics with their little control wheels and the EP2 I used to have with its ring and thumbwheel, and even my current Nex, which is all done with a single control ring and some very well placed buttons. I never shot with a film camera with anything more advanced than aperture priority, though, so I can't say that working with the X100 feels much like that. It auto-focuses, it can automate as much or as little as you want. If you use full manual, you can control the full stops for aperture and shutter speed with the traditional controls, but if you need a smaller increment, you're back to using the electronic controls on the back of the camera anyway.

    That said, I think its a LOT of fun to work with on its own modern/throwback terms. I love it. But I wouldn't buy it expecting the same experience as an old film camera. There are similarities, for sure, but big differences too. The biggest things I love about the camera are the excellent OVF with EVF always at the ready, and the totally silent operation, which is really something for street photography but matters less for other types of shooting.

    -Ray