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Fuji EF-20 Flash Unit on E-M10?

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by PointZero, Dec 26, 2014.

  1. PointZero

    PointZero Mu-43 Regular

    31
    Apr 28, 2011
    California
    Sorry if this is in the incorrect forum.

    I've been trying to figure out if the Fuji EF-20 flash is any way usable with the Olympus E-M10? I don't care if I lose TTL, since there's EV adjustment directly on the flash unit. If I mount it on my E-M10, will it be able to trigger? Would I need a voltage adapter to get the correct trigger voltage?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Growltiger

    Growltiger Mu-43 Top Veteran

    644
    Mar 26, 2014
    UK
    I think the EV adjustment is relative to the TTL setting, so it may not help. And it doesn't look like the flash has a manual mode.

    The trigger connection is always in the same place so my guess is it will trigger.

    If you buy a Nissin i40 for example it has M43 version, Fuji version, Nikon version etc, because the other connections on the shoe are different for each system.

    I use a Nikon SB800 on my E-M1 and that works fine. I set the flash to manual mode.

    You could try it, but If the connections mismatch in a way that causes damage you will break the camera and/or flash. Suggest you buy the Nissin i40, M43 version which is a great little flash, and avoid the risk.
     
  3. Mikefellh

    Mikefellh Mu-43 Top Veteran

    939
    Jun 7, 2012
    Toronto, Canada
    Exactly. Without Auto (thyristor) or Manual modes, the flash is TTL ONLY!


    Not always...I've seen a TTL flash that DOESN'T have the central contact. And of course the Olympus FL-LM2 flash doesn't have normal hotshoe contacts...all the contacts are on the AC2 accessory port.


    It should be pointed out that if you use a third party incompatible TTL flash (especially one designed for Canon), that even though the flash is not in TTL mode there is still voltage on the TTL contacts that can damage the flash and/or camera.
     
  4. eteless

    eteless Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2014
    I don't know about the EF-20 however the EF-X20 works with the E-M1. If you use it on a camera it cannot communicate with it will always fire at full power (GN 20), however the E-M1 can communicate enough that you can vary the power levels using the manual control dial. TTL is disabled.

    By switching the diffuser and power levels you also have half power steps (20, 14, 10, 7, 5, etc) as the wide angle diffuser cuts the power by almost perfectly half in my experience, thus manual flash with it is both very easy and predictable. The text ontop of it is actually grooved into the plastic as well, so if you happen to have a sakura glow in the dark paint marker you can fill in all the holes and have a glowing power dial for use in the dark... To use it on the majority of film cameras I've found you will need to cut a rubber stop off to fit it on and it will only fire at full power. Slave mode triggers dumb at whatever power level set, with preflash or no preflash detection.

    It's a fantastic little flash and generally my chosen unit on the E-M1 as you can push the sync speed up to 1/500th(full duration no banding) to 1/640th(short duration with only very minor banding) using it.
     
  5. Mikefellh

    Mikefellh Mu-43 Top Veteran

    939
    Jun 7, 2012
    Toronto, Canada
    But the EF-X20 has manual power mode so you can adjust the intensity yourself, BUT it doesn't have the aperture chart that is on generic manual flashes.
     
  6. PointZero

    PointZero Mu-43 Regular

    31
    Apr 28, 2011
    California
    Thanks for the input, everyone. Guess I'll just have to look at actually compatible flashes. It's a shame, as the EF-20 was the perfect size flash for the E-M10 -- in my opinion.
     
  7. fortwodriver

    fortwodriver Mu-43 Top Veteran

    959
    Nov 15, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Frank
    If you're strapped for cash, buy an Auto(Thyristor) flash. Even the cheapest ones expose very well now and you can do exposure compensation on them by changing the sensor "colour" or playing with the flash ISO setting and its "chart" on the back.
     
  8. RDM

    RDM Mu-43 All-Pro

    Using an adapter such as this PC socket adapter, should limit the communication ports to just the center pin.

    Also knowing your budget would help answer this question better.
     
  9. fortwodriver

    fortwodriver Mu-43 Top Veteran

    959
    Nov 15, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Frank
    Darn, there's no way to lock that adaptor down... it just floats in the hot-shoe...:-(
     
  10. RDM

    RDM Mu-43 All-Pro



    I just added the word Lock and searched for "PC Flash Adapter Lock" and I came up with this at the top of the list . If you want to spend more money and are wary of the mostly metal foot you can choose this option which was at the bottom of the list.

    Also I am aware that the internet or the search bar in eBay can be complicated, SO in the future just tell me what you are looking for and I will type the words in the search field for you . :biggrin:

    Seasons greetings
     
  11. fortwodriver

    fortwodriver Mu-43 Top Veteran

    959
    Nov 15, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Frank
    <cough>...thanks? I own two locking hot-foot-to-shoe devices already... Just was commenting on what you found...

    See what I said up there about using an Auto-Thyristor flash? That should do nicely rather than fiddling around with another manufacturers proprietary flash unit.
     
  12. eteless

    eteless Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2014
    It has the manual power mode HOWEVER it needs to have either electronic contact with the camera or be set in slave mode for it to be enabled, with canon/nikon cameras it will work only at full power.

    Also: what's an aperture chart? You just divide the guide number by your distance to get what aperture you need... GN28, so 5 meters would be around f/5.6... what does the chart do that my brain can't?
     
  13. eteless

    eteless Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2014
    • Like Like x 1
  14. fortwodriver

    fortwodriver Mu-43 Top Veteran

    959
    Nov 15, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Frank
    So f that's the case, is there not a a PF20XD still? Essentially the same flash unit but with an Auto feature and a slave sensor? They both appear to have the same power rating.

    http://www.sunpak.jp/english/products/pf20xd/index.html
     
  15. RDM

    RDM Mu-43 All-Pro

    If anyone is looking for a Basic, inexpensive flash that is a all manual Flash, you can't beat the Vivitar 285HV. They been making it for over 30 years for a reason.. Yes we know that the original Vivitar company that we all loved is no more than just a name slapped on most of their products nowadays, but the 283 and 285 flashes are so good they Still make them 99% the same , the 1% being the addition of the Lower trigger voltage for use on digital cameras (Those have the HV name designation).

    You can search that name and you will find many reviews and pages singing its praise.

    I have an old one that I picked up for twenty five dollars used, and use to use it as an off camera flash with a radio popper, so voltage was not issue. A few years back I purchased one of the HV ones Used from B&H for seventy nine dollars (I had misplaced my other one and needed it). I was using it on my G1 for a long time and would still be using it on my GH2 if I didn't find a Super Deal on a Metz Mecablitz 58AF, used for under fifty dollars..
     
  16. fortwodriver

    fortwodriver Mu-43 Top Veteran

    959
    Nov 15, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Frank
    I have a 285HV from about 2001, a 283 from about 1998 (low-voltage) and a 273 from about 1973 (not suitable for digicams, but fine as an optically triggered slave)...They're all fantastic flashes, but:

    I'd strongly advise against getting a recently made 285HV or 283. They are now made by the same guys who make "Cactus" flash units and the circuitry has been changed... mostly for the worse.

    You can find many posts online showing that after about 2005, the 285HV and 283 flash build quality tapered off significantly. Around that time, the original two or three factories making those flashes all went out of business and the companies Vivitar chose to take up the cause aren't even close in quality-control.

    If you're going to buy a 285, make sure it's a 285HV and made before 2007. Current 285HV flashes are completely different and prone to failure, sometimes spectacularly - I had one that emitted a pretty blue spark before completely dying. Whoh be you if you decide to attach a high-powered battery pack to some of the newer ones - they really don't behave very well anymore.

    If you do manage to get one that works, try and get the remote sensor cord for it. Then keep an eye on the variable-power control module, turn it back and forth from time to time as they tend to get "stuck" in manual mode as the contacts inside them wither/oxidize...
     
  17. Mikefellh

    Mikefellh Mu-43 Top Veteran

    939
    Jun 7, 2012
    Toronto, Canada
    As someone who owns THREE 285HVs (and a 283), you CAN beat it!

    My latest is the Yongnuo YN-560II (they've upgraded it to III since I bought mine). First it recharges MUCH FASTER than the Vivitar (Vivitar is one of the slowest recycling flashes I own, even with using the 400v power adapter). Second there's a lot more control being able to vary the intensity down to 1/128 in many steps (the Vivitar only has three or four steps). Also the Yongnuo has a built-in slave that's even smart for digital preflash use. The Yongnuo also has a strobing mode.

    The ONLY thing the Viviatar has over the Yongnuo is auto thyristor modes.

    The Yongnuo YN-560II can be found at Amazon for $60 right now, the Vivitar 285HV is $89 at B&H.