1. Reminder: Please use our affiliate links for holiday shopping!

Found Nikkor-P 105mm f/2.5

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by Mathom33, Dec 9, 2013.

  1. Mathom33

    Mathom33 Mu-43 Regular

    37
    Apr 4, 2013
    Found this lens in a consignment shop for $80. After inspecting the lens for a few minutes I decided I was going to buy it, but not at that price.

    The glass on it has a few light scratches on the coating of the front glass. The rear glass is flawless. The only thing I could visibly see was that the barrel looked pretty beat up and it smelled like someone used it for an ashtray. Mechanically, the lens had a few problematic areas where I could feel some hesitation when trying to turn the focusing ring. It did have a what I can only describe as a "grainy" feel to it.

    I called my wife's cousin, who is a photographer, and described the lens. He told me to put it down because the problems I mentioned made an expensive paperweight. Having been a certified welder in the Navy, cleaning barrel and filing the threads made this more of a reason as to why I should buy it.

    After what seemed like 15 minutes of haggling and showing reason as to why I shouldn't pay more than $10, I walked away having spent only $15.

    4ugynyvu.
     
  2. Mathom33

    Mathom33 Mu-43 Regular

    37
    Apr 4, 2013
    Breaking it down was simple process.

    Step 1. Take all of the screws and set screws out.
    Step 1.5. Have a beer or a glass of wine.
    Step 2. Unscrew everything away from the inner part of the barrel.
    Step 3. Clean the grease, dirt, and years of nicotine stains using some sort of engine degreaser. (Note: I used some Goo Off making sure that any optical glass was sealed in a box and in another room. I'm prone to have accidents!)
    Step 4. Repeat step 1.5
    Step 5. Using a pick to remove anything that the cleaner and a brush won't remove.
    Step 6. Take the smallest flathead screwdriver you can find and run it through the threads. The aluminum is soft enough to go back to its original form without too much trouble.
    a7yne5e9. zyze6e4y. zege9y5u.
    Step 7. Grease your threads with whatever you feel comfortable. I ended up using high temp bearing grease found in any of your local auto shops.

    I was left with this after repeating step 1.5 a few times, breaking away to take out my dogs, cooking dinner, eating said dinner with my wife, and then going out for some Christmas shopping.

    eje4asyv.

    Step 8. This was the trickiest part! Wake up the next morning and try to remember where each screw goes and the reverse order that you used to remove each piece.

    So if anyone knows what the next step is, please message me!!
     
    • Like Like x 2
  3. Mathom33

    Mathom33 Mu-43 Regular

    37
    Apr 4, 2013
    That was a joke. I put everything back together without having any leftovers.

    Here's a photo I took of one if my pups before heading to bed last night.
    ju5ajuqe.

    The focus is a little off since I wasn't wearing my glasses and she was moving. I don't have the proper reflexes to focus properly being new to photography and manual lenses.
     
  4. Cruzan80

    Cruzan80 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 23, 2012
    Denver, Co
    Sean Rastsmith
    Though glad to hear this was a joke, the best advice anyone gave me was to take pictures of each step, so you can figure out how it goes back together. Spent a frustrating couple of days trying every combination to get the metering pin back into a MC 58mm, till someone found a picture for me of exactly what I needed. Glad to hear it is working for you again. Maybe it is my imagination, but I have found lenses I repaired have better karma with me.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Matero

    Matero Mu-43 Veteran

    455
    Jun 22, 2013
    Finland
    I don't believe you, you should provide us photo of the lens, cleaned and screwed back to it's original shape again!! :wink:

     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Mathom33

    Mathom33 Mu-43 Regular

    37
    Apr 4, 2013
    As requested, here's the proof. nezasepa. urugegas. tureryte. eduhysuq.

    Here it is mounted on my GX1.
    tyqa3e8u.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Mathom33

    Mathom33 Mu-43 Regular

    37
    Apr 4, 2013
    I cleaned the middle element on my dads old 50mm Nikkor and it has become one of my favorite lenses. Here's the lens after cleaning it... before it looked glazed; like it had a dried milk stain inside. a8u8ahyg.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  8. Matero

    Matero Mu-43 Veteran

    455
    Jun 22, 2013
    Finland
    Really nice work! Looks like good old work horse. There is something in these old, sturdy lenses. Makes me wanting Nikon Df more, to host my old Nikon lenses I have in my drawer :rolleyes:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Neftun

    Neftun Mu-43 Veteran

    408
    Jul 15, 2012
    Norway
    Patrick Kristiansen
    This is an interresting topic, I have tried to find some info around this.

    I have a nikkor 35-70, the heavy one with constant f:2,8, got it years ago used with my first f90x. It got completely stuck some time ago, both zoom and focus jammed tight. Tried to have a shop look at it, and all they said was there were no spares and returned it untouched.

    This summer I thought what the hey, I'll fix it myself. Opened it up, rather clumsily at that, cause I tore the circuitry paperthingy, but I didn't worry too much about that, using it on m43.

    Now it zooms and focuses, but is a "dumb" nikkor, all manual. But a few shots showed another problem: a haze showed up when the sun was a little off frame.

    Any advice on how to fix this? Read somewhere about an adhesive between two lens-elements going old causing it, would that make this whle ordeal hopeless? Any advice is appreciated.


    Patrick K
     
  10. Mathom33

    Mathom33 Mu-43 Regular

    37
    Apr 4, 2013
    I took the lens apart which I believe may have gotten wet. It sat mounted in my fathers garage on his Nikon EM90 for about 15 years. Being in a very dry climate I highly doubt it was mold/fungus, but it still is a possibility. It did have some small dust particles in it and the first few pictures I took left a purple blob (the first thing I thought if was slimer from ghost busters) in the center of the image. It was the same purple color you see in chromatic aberration.

    This bothered me and thought I would junk it. Being somewhat nostalgic, I decided to put it away until I had the time to try and clean it up.

    I broke it down halfway to give an idea if it's internals. ebybebat. u4ebuper. ysadede6. 3yre4y9a.

    The element that is glued is the one I had an issue with. Luckily, it wasn't coming unglued like yours is. I gave it a good cleaning with some white vinegar and stuck it under a uv light in my chem lab for about 2 hours. When I got home I took it and gave it a good dusting with a blower and then ran a static brush over it. I tightened her back up and she works beautifully now.

    As far as your element separation goes, you can take the elements and stick them in a pot on the stove. Bring the water to boil and then cool it down. Once cooled repeat the process of boiling it. Eventually, the glue will melt off and you will have two elements that are clean.

    If they are the same width, take the lenses and use some UV glue to glue them back together. If they are different size lenses, I would take something to make a cast of them before breaking them apart. That way you will not lose their alignment.

    I have not done the boiling method, but my chemistry professor who is into photography has done this. I have seen a few writes up online with photos that you can search for to use as a guide.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. RnR

    RnR Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 25, 2011
    Brisbane, Australia
    Hasse
    Very nice work. Love seeing old lenses being bought back to life. I'm only good at step 1.5... and that took alot of practice...