Fotodiox Shift Lens Adapter

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by WorldShooter, Mar 5, 2013.

  1. WorldShooter

    WorldShooter Mu-43 Regular

    36
    Jan 17, 2013
    Giethoorn, Netherlands
    Peter B.
  2. DeeJayK

    DeeJayK Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 8, 2011
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Keith
    I don't have any personal experience with this type of adapter, but I've been curious about them myself. Unfortunately feedback from others around the forum who've tried one of these hasn't been glowing. I can't recall seeing any positive comments or any satisfactory results being posted.
     
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  3. Drdave944

    Drdave944 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    701
    Feb 2, 2012
    Epl-5_Canon_TSE-90.JPG


    I was playing around with a shift lens,a Canon 90mm T-SE on an Epl-5
    The tilt feature makes for incredible bokeh above and below the subject of to the right or left, depending on which way you tilt it. Just shifting the lens makes the light meter foul up ,but I don't see how it helps much.
    This lens has an extremely long throw when focusing so is a joy to use manually. It is manual any way.
    The adapter you are talking about would not do what the tilt shift lens would do. I will post a hand held shot I did yesterday.
     
  4. DeeJayK

    DeeJayK Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 8, 2011
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Keith
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  5. Drdave944

    Drdave944 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    701
    Feb 2, 2012
  6. Just Jim

    Just Jim Mu-43 Top Veteran

    941
    Oct 20, 2011
    Like the Lensbaby TT. it's lens dependent. the shift allows a pic to be taken at a different place in the image circle where weird abberations or fall off may exist. I find it helpful if you're very specific about distortion and you don't love software correction which is VERY understandable. In my experience, I have the Pro Shift FD adapter, I rarely use it, as my wide angle lenses shifted for the FD look like... you know... Besides I have a large format camera so I don't need the movements, I just want them, and I want them on all camera's. The TT is really the best option for adding movement (only tilt) to the mu4/3 I've used, although cleaning those things out is a major PIA.
     
  7. WorldShooter

    WorldShooter Mu-43 Regular

    36
    Jan 17, 2013
    Giethoorn, Netherlands
    Peter B.
    I doubt that... Legacy lenses (e.g. Nikon F mount) have larger image circles than mFT lenses, because they are designed for full frame (FX) or APS-sized (DX) sensors. Shifting one of those lenses with the shift adapter may not immediately result in weird aberrations or vignetting, as the edge of the image circle is still not reached.

    I'm not looking for distortion control (the Lensbabies can provide that, or any sort of weird software application). The shifting feature is mostly used (vertically) for perspective correction (re the famous Nikkor PC lenses) or (horizontally) for 2-shot panoramas (one shifted left, one right).

    Tilting a lens (something the subject adapter is not capable of doing) will control DoF, as per the Scheimpflug principle.

    Regards, Peter
     
  8. Just Jim

    Just Jim Mu-43 Top Veteran

    941
    Oct 20, 2011
    you'd be surprised, I have the adapter in question, and most fd lenses I've used it with have noticable weird things going on, especially fall off, on lets say a a half stop differnce on a 1/4 of your image.
     
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  9. tradesmith45

    tradesmith45 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 13, 2012
    Oregon
    Eventually, may try one of these w/ some old film lenses I have- 20mm F4 & 28mm F2.8 for example. But I've wondered if the small size of the Mµ43 mount will cause internal vignetting. Jim, do you see the same light falloff regardless of focal length?
     
  10. Just Jim

    Just Jim Mu-43 Top Veteran

    941
    Oct 20, 2011
    it really seems to depend on the lens.
     
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  11. tradesmith45

    tradesmith45 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 13, 2012
    Oregon
    Thanks Jim,
    Got some more questions.

    What's the shortest FL lens you've used it with?
    What are you photographing with it?
    Is light fall off the only weird problem you're seeing?
    Can you post any photos?
     
  12. wclavey

    wclavey Mu-43 Regular

    45
    Sep 27, 2012
    Houston, TX
    Westley
    Regarding real shift lenses, I have 2 manual Nikkor PC (shift) lenses: 35mm and 28mm. If you look at the technical reviews of these lenses when used on a 35mm FF sensor or film, they will exhibit some image degradation if you shift them all the way to the extreme, specifically in the corners and edges of the frame. But each lens does have a sweet spot, so that even when shifted to the extreme, there is a central circle of the image that does not exhibit the degradation. If you do the geometry, you will see that a 4:3 sensor remains inside the sweet spot even when the lens is shifted all the way to the extreme point. So, in general, you should not experience those degradation problems using these 2 lenses on 4:3s. Individual lenses may vary a bit (I have found some of these lenses to be "loose" and a bit wobbly - - but they are rather old) and the same geometry will not necessarily be true for other brands or designs of shift lenses.

    I have used these Nikkor PC lenses on my E-500, E-30 and E-M5 with great results. I do a lot of architecture (mostly decaying architecture) and sculpture (in cemeteries) shooting. And while the FoV on the 28mm is nicer from a 4:3s perspective, the 35mm actually works better for me. YMMV.

    I would be interested in trying out one of these shift lenses on a Nikon-->m43 tilt adapter specifically for being able to increase DoF in these architectural and cemetery shots. But they are physically large lenses and I am worried about the ability of the inexpensive tilt adapters to hold up under a lot of use out in the field.
     
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  13. tradesmith45

    tradesmith45 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 13, 2012
    Oregon
    Very helpful, thanks.
     
  14. tradesmith45

    tradesmith45 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 13, 2012
    Oregon
    Wclavy got questions for you. Perspective correction could be accomplished in post processing or w/ a PC lens. What are the advantages of using a lens? How often do you have to fix an evenness of illumination or edge softness problem caused by shifting the lens during PP?

    Have you tried perspective correction during PP?

    Thanks,
     
  15. wclavey

    wclavey Mu-43 Regular

    45
    Sep 27, 2012
    Houston, TX
    Westley
    You can do perspective correction in PP, for sure... and if I go shooting with just a few lenses and do not take my shift lenses, I do have to do that. I prefer not to do that because, depending on the adjustment that needs to be made, if you need to correct key-stoning, for example, while the picture needs to compress at the bottom, it needs to expand at the top... and the expansion requires creating detail in the image that doesn't exist. So if I have a choice, I would rather make it so I neither need to create nor destroy detail - - by fixing the perspective in the original image.

    Because I use the real PC lenses and not an adapter, and I'm only shooting 4:3s or m4:3s, I do not have any problems where the shifting causes vignetting or fall-off. The 4:3s sensor always stays within the sweet spot of the lens circle and does not "see" those deteriorations.
     
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