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Fotodiox Extension Tubes on G3

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by runner girl, Oct 24, 2012.

  1. runner girl

    runner girl Mu-43 Regular

    192
    Nov 26, 2011
    Perhaps someone can help... I purchased the Fotodiox extension tubes for my G3 a few months ago - I could not get them to work. I can't get them to focus on anything... I really thought that it was operator error (probably is...) but I took them to my photo class last night and even the experienced instructor could not get them to work.

    I assumed that I needed to turn on "shoot without lens" so did that but beyond that I don't know what to do.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. BarefootPilgrim

    BarefootPilgrim Mu-43 Top Veteran

    517
    Dec 23, 2009
    Westchester, IL
    Bob
    Problem with the Fotodiox tubes is that there are no electrical connections in them; so there's no way for the camera to communicate with the lens.

    Since almost all the native m4/3 lenses require this communication in order to focus (even manual focus), those Fotodiox tubes won't work with native m4/3 lenses. Remember, these lenses are "focus by wire," so they need to get power from the camera to operate the focus motor. No connections through the extension tubes means no power to the motor.

    The only exceptions are the few lenses (Nokton f/0.95 comes to mind) which really are manual focus using a geared mechanical focus ring rather than an electric focus motor operated by an electric focus ring.

    The Kenko tubes are the only ones I know of that provide the necessary electrical connections for camera-to-lens communication. They're expensive (about $180 US compared to Fotodiox's $20), but they do work and work very well as evidenced by shots in another thread on this forum.

    Sorry for the bad news, but you'll need a true manual lens (both focus and aperture) to use the Fotodiox tubes.
     
  3. Dc5e

    Dc5e Mu-43 Regular

    31
    Apr 15, 2012
    You should be able to use those extension tubes. As mentioned, they don't have electrical contacts, so you won't be able to focus or change apertures. The only way you can focus is to move the camera forward and back. The lack of aperture control also means that you will have a very small DoF.

    Depending on what lens and focal length you used, it's possible the focus point was extremely close to or behind the front element. Try using the shortest setting on the extension tube with a long (or your longest) lens and experiment from there.