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Focus question on E-M10 II

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by kgeissler, Jun 20, 2016.

  1. kgeissler

    kgeissler Mu-43 Regular

    108
    Oct 25, 2012
    Rowlett, TX
    ()

    I was watching this video on youtube about getting my landscape photos sharp. I wanted everything to be in focus. In the video he is able to use a live view to make sure the mountains are in focus. How can I do that on the E-M10 II? I tried the zoom feature, but it didn't seem to work. Any ideas?
     
  2. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    A m43 camera is constantly in live view mode. The eye detector sensor switch from the EVF to the LCD. Press the button on the side of the EVF to switch manually and keep it pressed to activate a small menu' to configure the eye sensor.

    By default when you use manual focus the screen is automatically magnified and you can use the arrows and the wheel to choose the location and magnification. The problem is that the magnified view disappears as soon as you stop moving the focus ring.

    So the most practical way is to assign magnify and/or focus peaking to one or two function buttons. Magnify is already a sub-function of the Multi function button. If the E-M10 mk ii works like the mk i just press and keep pressed Fn2 and turn the front wheel to select the "Magnify" function. From now on Fn2 acts as Magnify toggle. For peaking you need to find another button (I use rec button).

    In my experience peaking is faster to use, but magnify is more accurate.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. kgeissler

    kgeissler Mu-43 Regular

    108
    Oct 25, 2012
    Rowlett, TX
    I am confused about focusing. I took the following pictures in my backyard today at f/5, f/8 and f/22 respectively. I focused on the back of the chair. Why do the rooftops in the background all appear to be in focus? All the shots basically look the same. Can someone give me some insight? I thought that at f/5, some of the rooftops would be slightly out of focus as compared to the f/22.

    See the pics here:
    https://goo.gl/photos/rh98X5TQ1LePEU2dA
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2016
  4. Growltiger

    Growltiger Mu-43 Top Veteran

    648
    Mar 26, 2014
    UK
    The roof in the left picture is blurrier. Repeat with the camera much closer to the back of the chair. f/22 is too small to get really sharp results, which confuses things (see diffraction limit). Compare wide open and f/11.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    If you use a wide lens the depth of field is extremely large. You can use a tool like these:

    A Flexible Depth of Field Calculator
    Bokeh simulator & depth of field calculator (check the interactive part at the bottom moving the subject around)

    to see how big it is. With a 14mm lens at f/5.6 if you focus at just 2.3 meters you get everything in focus from 1.1 meters to infinity(*).
    So stopping down the lens to 8 or 22 won't make any significant difference in this case (ignoring diffraction).

    To clearly see some difference you need to use a longer lens or wider apertures or to include some elements really close to the camera forcing you to focus closer (placing the camera close to the terrain for example). I think that in the 5.6 shot the front part of the chair is slightly out of focus. Moving the focus point a little closer to the camera you can get that part in focus too but this reduce the overall depth of field so the roof in the background may appear more blurry.


    (*) Even inside the "in focus zone" you have different degrees of sharpness. If, for example, things from 2 meters to 500 meters may be considered "in focus" by a DoF calculator not everything inside that zone is equally sharp. So it's better to visually check, with magnify, to find the perfect balance in close/distant object sharpness. This is true for difficult situations, with wide lenses usually there is plenty of DoF for everything.