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FL-600R Flash Question

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by Wasabi Bob, May 31, 2013.

  1. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Does anyone know how to turn off the blinking white LED illuminator?
    I've read through the instructions and I must be missing something.
     
  2. Halaking

    Halaking Mu-43 Top Veteran

    667
    Dec 17, 2012
    Los Angeles
    Morris
    do you mean when the flash in RC mode?
     
  3. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Yes

    Yes
    I'm seeing that this can't be disabled.
     
  4. Halaking

    Halaking Mu-43 Top Veteran

    667
    Dec 17, 2012
    Los Angeles
    Morris
    unfortunately I saw the same discussion somewhere in the other thread that mention it can't be turn off.
     
  5. RobWatson

    RobWatson Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    This thread? That was not the LED blinking ...

    PP 31 of the user manual gives detail on control of the LED/AF assist light if that is the one.

    Put the LED into manual mode that way it won't fire unless you manually turn it on. On the flash ON then > over to the LED control section ...
     
  6. Mikefellh

    Mikefellh Mu-43 Top Veteran

    939
    Jun 7, 2012
    Toronto, Canada
    You can't/don't want to turn it off...the idea of it flashing is to let you know the flash has recharged and is ready to fire when using it wirelessly and you can't see the back f the flash. Other Olympus wireless flashes do this too!
     
  7. RobWatson

    RobWatson Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Too many LEDs ... how about reference the part as labelled in the user manual so we know exactly which LED is needed to be turned off?

    Or, slap some gaffers tape over the sucker.
     
  8. Mikefellh

    Mikefellh Mu-43 Top Veteran

    939
    Jun 7, 2012
    Toronto, Canada
    There's only ONE "blinking white LED iluminator" (as stated in the opening post) on the flash...it's the one on the front of the flash. The only other LEDs are yellow (the charge indicator/test button) and green (auto check and backlight on the display).

    Or a dark gel...that way it isn't so noticeable, but you can still tell if the flash is ready to fire.
     
  9. entropicremnants

    entropicremnants Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jul 16, 2012
    John Griggs
    The FL-600R has a software bug where it doesn't control the brightness of that illuminator properly. Turn up the power on it, and it stops that flicker it has. As it comes from the factory it's at partial power and it does flickr. Terrible for video, lol. I have one and it does this, and I know others with the problem.

    That said, it's acting as the AF illuminator when it's on the camera. That can be addressed in the camera menu not the flash I do believe.

    EDIT: Oh, and it will always flash in remote control mode. Forgot about that...

    I just did some tests on my G5 and on the flash if you are in "Mode" "SL A" it will flash. Put it in straight "A" mode and when it is on the camera it should switch to "TTL A". In that mode it doesn't flash the LED.
     
  10. uci2ci

    uci2ci Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 22, 2012
    Los Angeles, CA
    Sam
    I was always under the impression that the constant brightness of the bkinking light was used by the camera to gauge the distance of the flash from the subject so it properly illuminates it....sort of like Cepheid stars
     
  11. entropicremnants

    entropicremnants Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jul 16, 2012
    John Griggs
    It doesn't use it in TTL. Not sure it's needed. Are you talking about pre-flash for exposure control? Distance is inherently known by the autofocus system.
     
  12. uci2ci

    uci2ci Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 22, 2012
    Los Angeles, CA
    Sam
    No, im talking about the flashing light on the flash when its in RC mode. I thought that the camera uses that like a preflash to estimate the distance of the flash from the subject.
     
  13. Bravin Neff

    Bravin Neff Mu-43 Regular

    192
    Sep 25, 2011
    Detroit
    Bravin Neff
    Sorry to hijack the thread but, am I the only one that feels TTL auto usually underexposes, but that TTL Auto (thryster mode) gives more consistent (better) exposures?
     
  14. entropicremnants

    entropicremnants Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jul 16, 2012
    John Griggs
    Ah, I get you. I hadn't heard that but it's possible. My Nikon's also flashed off-camera in RC mode and for all I know that's what they were doing but I've never seen anything on it.

    EDIT: Although I don't think it does, otherwise everything would be screwed up with off camera bounce flash when it's not pointing at the subject -- and it wasn't when I did that.
     
  15. entropicremnants

    entropicremnants Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jul 16, 2012
    John Griggs
    I think it more often than not does, but like all the exposure controls without flash it isn't consistent enough, lol. Meters aren't perfect.

    I like the FL-600 and it's easy access to flash compensation which solves that. Actually my Nikon SB-600's worked about the same. It's fine though when you're at base ISO mostly as you have latitude to fix it in post in case you don't catch it.

    I don't find thyristor mode flexible enough. I used to shoot everything that way back in the day though with film. For my Ricoh KR-10 I never had a TTL flash. I've used non-TTL flashes on my digitals that way and it works fine, but I usually trim the exposure compensation on the camera for that.

    Auto thyristor uses a single sensor which basically exposes like a very old non-matrix exposure meter -- like a single CdS cell type meter. That's just not going to get it in all situations.

    Kind of like every mode has its quirks you have to work around, lol.
     
  16. Mikefellh

    Mikefellh Mu-43 Top Veteran

    939
    Jun 7, 2012
    Toronto, Canada
    Doesn't anyone rad the replies in this thread? Repeating what I wrote:

    "...the idea of it flashing is to let you know the flash has recharged and is ready to fire when using it wirelessly and you can't see the back of the flash. Other Olympus wireless flashes do this too!"
     
  17. Mikefellh

    Mikefellh Mu-43 Top Veteran

    939
    Jun 7, 2012
    Toronto, Canada
    Using the flash in Auto (thyristor) (not TTL) mode is only good when you are shooting one flash, and your flash is the only one in the room. With other flashes going off, the thyristor is fooled and shuts off your flash prematurely.

    Now there's no doubt that thyristors do a good job, I used them for a couple of decades, but they have their limitations. The idea is that once the light from your flash hits the subject and bounces back, the thyristor knows there's enough light and shuts off the flash emission. But with other flashes going off thyristors are useless.
     
  18. entropicremnants

    entropicremnants Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jul 16, 2012
    John Griggs
    Don't let it get to you, or you'll go crazy. It's life on a forum, lol.

    Very true but I'll add that it isn't the thyristor as such that has anything to do with the metering. The thyristor is just an electronic "switch" that can be used to quench the flash tube when it's time for it to stop making light. The photocell and exposure monitoring circuit tell the thyristor when to fire. TTL flashes also use Thyristors.

    However, back in the days before TTL, we all got into the habit of calling automatic flashes "thyristor flashes" and the habit persists today even though TTL flashes -- whether they have a legacy auto mode or not -- are also thyristor flashes.

    It doesn't mean anything significant, lol -- but I wanted to be historically accurate.