First use of my new camera (E-PM2)

Discussion in 'Nature' started by gengo, May 14, 2014.

  1. gengo

    gengo Mu-43 Regular

    70
    May 12, 2014
    So yeah, this is my first camera that has had adjustable anything (besides zoom).

    Since I am new to ALL of this, I would greatly appreciate any and all feedback.

    The picture with the cat was taken with the ART BKT - so I'm not certain which ART mode that is.

    The rest are just me playing in my garden.

    It is safe to assume I know almost nothing - so all constructive criticism is greatly appreciated (from composition to camera settings).

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/124525285@N05/sets/72157644259134098/


    River by Yamabushi Gengo, on Flickr


    Baby Grasshopper by Yamabushi Gengo, on Flickr


    Near flowers in focus by Yamabushi Gengo, on Flickr


    Near flowers NOT in focus by Yamabushi Gengo, on Flickr


    Some sort of beetle by Yamabushi Gengo, on Flickr
     
    • Like Like x 5
  2. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    Very nice first shots! It looks like you're already experiencing one of the things this sort of camera can do, and that is shallow depth of field. I'd say one of the best things you can do right off is to learn what effects you can get at different aperture settings. Basically, don't live in auto mode, venture out into A mode and beyond.

    Remember, (digital) film is cheap! ;)

    •••GX1+LVF-2+Olympus 17mm f/2.8, GF3; Konica FS-1, C35v; various lenses•••
     
  3. gengo

    gengo Mu-43 Regular

    70
    May 12, 2014
    Thank you kindly.

    Yes, I don't remember what my settings were for the cat - but the rest (I think) were in Aperture Priority mode.
     
  4. Cruzan80

    Cruzan80 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 23, 2012
    Denver, Co
    Sean Rastsmith
    The only compositional critique I can give is that the near flower in focus shot would probably have looked better with the Not in focus composition. Unfortunately, you cut off the bottom of the flower. Maybe a case of turning off some of the display to make sure you can see the edges? Otherwise, with the two small bugs, have you tried a 2-3x crop? Leave a bit of the leaf tip in the shot (gives a sense of scale, and prevents a bland background), but depending on your focus accuracy, could make a neat close-up.
     
  5. psknapp

    psknapp Mu-43 Regular

    68
    Feb 7, 2013
    Great start. I really like the E-PM2! My advice is, after you get used to the settings (and the admittedly confusing menu), turn on the super control panel. With so few physical controls, the SCP makes it so much easier to manage all the settings. One note about the ART settings, when I use them, I always make sure to use JPG plus RAW. The ART filters only apply to the JPG, so the RAW file is still normal.
     
  6. gengo

    gengo Mu-43 Regular

    70
    May 12, 2014
    Thank you.

    When you say 2-3x crop, are you talking about after taking the picture cropping it in a program?
     
  7. Cruzan80

    Cruzan80 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 23, 2012
    Denver, Co
    Sean Rastsmith
    Yes. For example, this is one I took with my Minolta 45mm at MFD (Minimum Focus Distance), which for this is around 1.5ft. And another from the same time that I cropped later in Lightroom (even can be done in Paint, if necessary). Didn't want you searching the first one for the bees that weren't there. This was one of my first attempts, I have later done a crop that isn't so severe, and doesn't have so many sharpening artifacts, but a great example of what is possible.

    Bee_uncropped.
    Bee_Macro.
     
  8. Itchybiscuit

    Itchybiscuit Photon Mangler

    512
    Dec 10, 2013
    Glasgow, Scotland
    Ivor
    I always try to get the front of my lens as close to the little thing (insect/flower/water droplet) as possible. Use your feet to zoom. Watch out for your shadow falling across the subject and crop your image as tightly as you can when you process it on your PC.

    It just means that the tiny thing you're photographing looks huge in the final image and because you've moved yourself that much closer physically, you retain most of the quality. Hope I've helped. :eek:)
     
  9. gengo

    gengo Mu-43 Regular

    70
    May 12, 2014
    Yes, absolutely - thank you!

    I've run into some issues where the camera WON'T take a picture if I'm too close. I press the button, the green "auto focus" light in the top right corner comes on, and the camera will not take the picture.

    Because of that, I adjusted the distance of the camera lens and then used the zoom in order to get closer.

    Also, I've never worked with any "post processing" - as mentioned above, not even a crop.

    I'll try to start that soon.

    Thank you all again.
     
  10. JHM

    JHM Mu-43 Regular

    60
    Mar 6, 2014
    Amsterdam area
    Welcome to the m43 format.The E-PM1 was my first ajustable camera.
    You took some nice pictures. Hope you will enjoy your camera and the M43 format to the fullest.
     
  11. Cruzan80

    Cruzan80 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 23, 2012
    Denver, Co
    Sean Rastsmith
    With a native lens in AF mode, it will refuse to take the picture if the AF doesn't lock. This can happen if you are closer than the minimum focus distance.
     
  12. gengo

    gengo Mu-43 Regular

    70
    May 12, 2014
    I just realized that all of these are 16:9 (again, no "post processing" as I've yet to explore what that means and where to start).

    So for things like this, I should probably switch to 4:3 and use 16:9 for landscape shots?
     
  13. Cruzan80

    Cruzan80 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 23, 2012
    Denver, Co
    Sean Rastsmith
    I always shoot 4:3 and then crop in post. Otherwise, the sensor throws away the other data to make it into a different format. So there is no way to "add back" the information to make it 4:3 again.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. Itchybiscuit

    Itchybiscuit Photon Mangler

    512
    Dec 10, 2013
    Glasgow, Scotland
    Ivor
    gengo, it's a matter of preference. I shoot in 3:2.

    Try different things until you decide which suits your style of photography best. There really is no 'wrong' answer for some settings. :thumbup:
     
    • Like Like x 1