First time taking out my G9 in the rain - how can I be prepared?

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I have a backpacking trip planned where it will rain. I've never taken out my camera in the direct rain before so I wanted to see what I can do to make sure I don't destroy my gear.

I will pair my G9 with the weather sealed Lumix 8-18 mm for a one night trip.

I don't have any lens swapping in mind while I am taking photos.

I want to keep my G9 handy on my backpack strap using a PeakDesign clip.

I've seen some videos where people are literally showering off their camera and lens with a hose. Do I have nothing to worry about? Is it even worth taking photos in that kind of weather?
 

Phocal

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Shooting in inclement weather is my favorite time to shoot. Not only can seeing the rain streaking by in the photo add to it, you can get light that can’t be replicated in post.

I don’t take any special steps unless I’ll be at the beach with blowing sand and salt water. For those conditions I just make sure to have plenty of fresh water to rinse off my gear.

I regularly test the weather sealing because I like shooting from a kayak and until recently lots of shooting in the swamps of texas. I will also swap out TC’s or even lenses in the rain, taking necessary precautions of course. You can do a search, I’ve talked about weather sealing many times on this forum.

Mount up a weather sealed lens and enjoy your trip.

My 2 copper pieces,

Phocal
 

gwydionjhr

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Have a look at www.outex.com the entry level cover and the 67mm flat port would keep your camera 100% dry. You'll need the pro level cover and the rear glass if you want to really be able to see your rear screen/viewfinder.

I get splashes on that camera/lens combo pretty regularly, but I don't think I'd want to expose it to hours and hours of rain.
 

gwydionjhr

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Why not? If Panasonic weather sealing is 1/2 as good as Olympus it will be fine. That is what it’s designed for. Those camera condoms just get in the way.
I guess it depends on the amount of rain and length of exposure. He said he wants to carry it outside his bag.

None of this stuff is rated as waterproof, I'd rather spend a few bucks and deal with the condom vs losing $3K worth of gear.
 

Hazza

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I no longer have the G9 but I have used it in pretty rough weather and no harm done. No special precautions taken but kept an eye on it and covered it up when possible, didn't skip a beat. I have also used the GX8 and 35-100 for several hours in pouring rain and it too performed equally well.
So cover it if you can but don't sweat about it.
 

Cederic

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I've used the EM1.2 under a waterfall, in heavy rain, in light persistent rain, in snow and when it was a bit damp outside.

The trick is to not worry about it.

More helpfully, just keep the camera pointed down when you're not taking a shot, hold it near to your body so that your arm and body block most/all of the rain from reaching it while it's not in use, avoid tilting it upwards.

Do fit the lens hood (more useful against rain than sun for me) so that you get fewer drops on the lens itself when you do need to raise it. I don't fit the lens cap itself though, because that tends to mean looking at the lens to see what I'm doing and that points it up, risking rain hitting it while putting the cap on/off. The less rain that hits the glass, the less cleaning you have to do: I like having a clean lens but hate having to clean it, especially in the rain where your shiny clean glass can easily pick up a new water drop while you're actually cleaning it.

Changing the lens isn't an issue either. Turn your back to the wind, keep the camera pointed down the whole time and just switch lenses quickly. It's less of an issue than changing the lens on the beach or in strong winds.

If you're concerned ahead of your trip then pop outside next time it rains and take a photograph. Better to find out in advance :) I would avoid standing in the shower though, that feels silly and the water flow would be substantially higher than you're going to encounter in the wild (although I do confess to having more than once washed my camera and lens under a running tap. I don't however recommend this).
 

jhawk1000

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I know the OP wanted to know about splash proof of the equipment. We use very inexpensive Op-Tech plastic rain covers for our equipment when caught in the rain during football games. Works like a champ.
 

demiro

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If you're shooting for fun, but worrying about camera in weather is causing stress, then don't bother. Not worth it.

You can always pick up a TG series Oly (waterproof) for decent snaps, or even an E-M5 + 12-50 for maybe $300, so if worst case scenario somehow happens your loss is mitigated.
 

retiredfromlife

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To some extent the amount of precaution equals your ability to replace the gear if it does get damaged, or if you have a backup body with you on your trip.

Olympus has a very good track record from what I have seen on this forum. As an example @Phocal has posted images of his [Oly Gear] in use in bad conditions as have a few others but I do not remember their names.

Panasonic may be as good but not as many users reporting their experiences with it in really bad weather, and have posted pictures to back up their claims. But it may be I have just missed the posts as I follow Oly a bit more than Panasonic.

If I needed a really weather proof system I think I would get the EM1X. Other system users like Matt Granger an Nikon user indicated he thought the EM1X proofing was far better than his Nikon gear

 

WaltP

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1. Try to keep the front element free of raindrops, they will destroy your images. Generally try to keep it facing down, not up, 2. try to keep a couple of lens cloth pieces (microfiber/chamois/etc) on you for the occasional quick wipe, and 3. Find a way to carry the camera that leaves your hands free for balance and the quick grab that prevents a fall. Speed of access while walking is really not important. When you shoot, stop first, for a million good reasons.
 

WaltP

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I've used the EM1.2 under a waterfall, in heavy rain, in light persistent rain, in snow and when it was a bit damp outside.

The trick is to not worry about it.

More helpfully, just keep the camera pointed down when you're not taking a shot, hold it near to your body so that your arm and body block most/all of the rain from reaching it while it's not in use, avoid tilting it upwards.

Do fit the lens hood (more useful against rain than sun for me) so that you get fewer drops on the lens itself when you do need to raise it. I don't fit the lens cap itself though, because that tends to mean looking at the lens to see what I'm doing and that points it up, risking rain hitting it while putting the cap on/off. The less rain that hits the glass, the less cleaning you have to do: I like having a clean lens but hate having to clean it, especially in the rain where your shiny clean glass can easily pick up a new water drop while you're actually cleaning it.

Changing the lens isn't an issue either. Turn your back to the wind, keep the camera pointed down the whole time and just switch lenses quickly. It's less of an issue than changing the lens on the beach or in strong winds.

If you're concerned ahead of your trip then pop outside next time it rains and take a photograph. Better to find out in advance :) I would avoid standing in the shower though, that feels silly and the water flow would be substantially higher than you're going to encounter in the wild (although I do confess to having more than once washed my camera and lens under a running tap. I don't however recommend this).
Listen to this simple good advice. Nothing to sweat about, it's not mud fields with bullets flying. Point the lens down, don't fret over it. Bandolero style strap keeps it near your body and frees your hands while moving on trails.
 

JensM

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I normally sling it across the body, with the camera ending up under my left arm, if out in horrible weather, I habitually slings the camera and then don the jacket on top. Never had a problem and this is is a practice I have used from back in the film days where a camera with some sort of weather resistance would have been a Nikonos...
 

Darmok N Jalad

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I used the G9 in the snow the other day and it would melt on the camera and lens. Wasn’t soaking, but no harm done. I just kept the lens down to keep it clean. Another thought is to throw a few silica gel packs in your bag for when you are done, and that will help draw any moisture away.
 

Bushboy

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I fried an Olympus 60mm macro by changing lenses in light rain. I think a raindrop short circuited the contacts, while attaching the lens to the camera , while the camera was switched on...
Hopefully I won’t do this again, and don’t try it just to see if I’m correct.
 
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  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #18
Lots of great pieces of feedback and experiences in this thread. Here's what I've decided I will be doing.

First, I will definitely take my camera out in the rain next week to see how it holds up when I can easily retreat into a dry house while out for the holiday.

Next, I've decided if all goes well, I'll go with the PeakDesign capture clip and have my lens point down as often as possible. I don't plan on using any sort of protection, but I will bring a spare dry bag just in case.

I typically do not leave the lens cap on unless I am putting my camera away in my bag or if I need to deal with some rocky, steep terrain. In this circumstance, it sounds like it might be best to keep the lens cap on when the camera is not in use.

Wish me luck! Thanks again for all the great advice and helpful comments.
 

JensM

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Forgot to mention it, but hotel showercaps makes for a neat rain cover if the weather are exceptionally harsh. I used to carry one in the camera bag back then. Had forgot about until now so will secure me a couple next time I am at a hotel.
 
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