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Finally adapted my first LEICA **not what you may expect*

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by verbatimium, Jan 7, 2014.

  1. verbatimium

    verbatimium Mu-43 Veteran

    204
    Jul 17, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario
    Martin
    Leica Leitz Laborlox S Light Microscope equipped with Leitz EF 4x, 10x, 25x, 40x, 100x objectives.

    Finally took this old beast out of the closet and decided to adapt my Olympus PL5 to it. Found some old slides that I have stained/mounted and took a few images. Didn't have too much time to play around with it but I will definitely go back to this combination when I get some spare time. Hope you enjoy.


    MicroscopeLeica-1.

    MicroscopeLeica-2.

    MicroscopeLeica-3.

    Cross section of a Corn Seed taken with 4X objective:
    Microscope-1.

    Cross section of a Mushroom Gills taken with 10X objective. These are the tips of the gills. The brown ovals are mushroom spores:
    Microscope-2.

    Cross section of a Plant Stem taken with 4X objective:
    Microscope-3.

    Cross section of a Plant Root taken with 4X objective:
    Microscope-4.

    Whole mount of Mosquito Larvae Head taken with 4x objective:
    [​IMG]

    Whole mount of Mosquito Head taken with 4x objective. What you see are the antenna on the mosquito head:
    Microscope-6.
     
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  2. shutterduster

    shutterduster Mu-43 Regular

    144
    Feb 8, 2013
    Keremeos, BC. Canada
    Dave T
    Now this is taking macro to a whole new dimension:eek:
     
  3. Rudy

    Rudy Mu-43 Veteran

    449
    Jan 24, 2013
    Oakland, CA
    Can you tell us what adapter you used and where you got it?
    Rudy
     
  4. Tilman Paulin

    Tilman Paulin Mu-43 Veteran

    329
    Jun 10, 2013
    Dublin, Ireland
    these are great!
    Like abstract art, especially the 4th one ("Cross section of a Plant Root taken with 4X objective") could go right on the wall... :)

    Are these the original colours or are they coloured in some way?
     
  5. verbatimium

    verbatimium Mu-43 Veteran

    204
    Jul 17, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario
    Martin
    Rudy, messaged you about this.

    Thanks! The mosquito whole sections are the only ones I posted with original colours. The plant cross sections have been stained with different dyes that target different structures such as plant cell walls, etc. I did these a few years ago so I would have to go back to see which stains were used. For example, in the mushroom gill cross section, the brown stain specifically binds to the cell walls of fungal spores, giving only the spores a brown color, while the rest of the gill is stained with a different blue dye. In the corn seed image, you can actually see that both the red and blue dyes stain the nuclei of those cells (which is single dark dot in each of the cells which are outlined with the blue dye). The images were never coloured in post process.
     
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  6. Narnian

    Narnian Nobody in particular ...

    Aug 6, 2010
    Midlothian, VA
    Richard Elliott
    Great adaptation! I used a Leica microscope 40 years ago (with a Leica body on the top) and have some wonderful slides of parasites.
     
  7. chonbhoy

    chonbhoy Mu-43 Veteran

    430
    Apr 23, 2013
    Scottish Highlands
    Will 100x be able to take a good image of THC crystals? They are beautiful as snowflakes!
     
  8. chonbhoy

    chonbhoy Mu-43 Veteran

    430
    Apr 23, 2013
    Scottish Highlands
    Bow down! What a treat! This GUY!!!! :)
     
  9. Superstriker#8

    Superstriker#8 Mu-43 Regular

    194
    Jun 24, 2013
  10. verbatimium

    verbatimium Mu-43 Veteran

    204
    Jul 17, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario
    Martin
    Well the 100x objective requires oil immersion so the specimen has to be very small or thin, and be covered by a coverslip. You will most likely require a different type of microscope. If the crystals are clear, you will not be able to see anything with a scope like this unless it is set up to do phase contrast (this is the reason that thin slices of the plants above need to be stained with dyes).

    Also, the true magnification of this setup using the 100x objective is actually 250x when the image is projected onto the sensor of the camera as the eyepiece that the camera is looking through is 2.5x magnification. At that magnification, the depth of field is so razor thing that you pretty much can only look at very thin (one cell thick) slices of objects. You can see this in the mushroom spores picture where some spores are in focus, while others are. And that is with the 10x objective which is only 25x magnification. Each spore (brown oval) is about 10-20 micrometers in diameter.
     
  11. RichardB

    RichardB Snapshooter

    442
    Nov 19, 2012
    Maryland, US
    Richard
    Does that 2.5x magnification account for the MFT crop factor? I don't know what the setup is between microscope and camera, but if the eyepiece/adapter gives 2.5x on a 35mm or full-frame camera, it must give 5x magnification on MFT.
     
  12. verbatimium

    verbatimium Mu-43 Veteran

    204
    Jul 17, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario
    Martin
    I was thinking about that as well but I don't think that sensor size matters. It is like saying a true macro lens projects a 1:1 magnification image on the sensor (no matter how small or how big the sensor is, the magnification is always 1:1). Someone correct me if I am wrong about this.
     
  13. RichardB

    RichardB Snapshooter

    442
    Nov 19, 2012
    Maryland, US
    Richard
    You're right, the magnification at the sensor will be the same regardless of sensor size.
     
  14. Web-Betty

    Web-Betty Mu-43 Veteran

    337
    Jun 16, 2013
    Denver
    MJ
    So cool!!
     
  15. McBob

    McBob Mu-43 Regular

    111
    Apr 22, 2012
    Magnificent

    One of my main clients is a scientific video methods journal, we use these kits for most video microscopy:
    http://www.microscope.com/accessories/camera-adapters/omano-cas39-camadapter-kit.html

    I usually shoot these with GH2 and also usually bring MFT adapters for Nikon, OM, Leica-R, and C-mount as some specialized scopes will have an auxiliary port for these mounts. Otherwise the adapter goes through one of the occulars
     
  16. Adubo

    Adubo SithLord

    Nov 4, 2010
    Globetrotter
    Andrew
    this thread feel like microbiology in nursing school all over again....


    ... great images tho! i remember taking out my cellphone to take pictures of the slides via a microscope to study at home... ugh, not-so-good times.... at least i passed. :wink:
     
  17. janneman

    janneman Mu-43 Veteran

    414
    Dec 6, 2012
    Netherlands
    Jan (John) Kusters
    excellent work! I am nowhere nearly as good on making microscopic slides, but I have my oly camera stuck to a very old oly microscope :yahoo:

    web-C-4575_22-Nov-2012.

    web-O-2255_22-Nov-2012-frontonia-met--vacuole.

    Your pics are great, I will have to learn a lot before I get up to that, both on slide preparation and micro photography!
     
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  18. verbatimium

    verbatimium Mu-43 Veteran

    204
    Jul 17, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario
    Martin
    Nice setup John. I used to have an earlier version of the Leitz Laborlux that looked very similar to your Oly microscope. Ended up selling it as I didn't have room to keep both scopes but have been regretting it ever since.

    This opens up a whole new way of using digital cameras. I don't think there is one picture that you can down the microscope that will be a boring picture (other than if its an grossly misfocused or empty slide).

    Maybe I will have some time later today to take some images. I will post them here if I do.
     
  19. verbatimium

    verbatimium Mu-43 Veteran

    204
    Jul 17, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario
    Martin
    Here are a few more images:

    Cross section of the main vein of a cotton leaf:
    MicroscopeImages-3.

    Cross section of a soya stem:
    MicroscopeImages-2.

    Silk worm moth larva:
    MicroscopeImages-1.

    Pine code seed. The red are the cells making up the woody part, while the green is the developing seed.
    MicroscopeImages-4.
     
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