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Filters for UV, IR and Visible

Discussion in 'Black and White' started by tbyork2012, Jun 9, 2013.

  1. tbyork2012

    tbyork2012 Mu-43 Veteran

    213
    Nov 14, 2012
    Oxford, UK
    Hi,
    Thought some of you may be interested to know that there are various filters which have become available on eBay recently, which are useful for shooting in UV, IR and also visible-light with a full-spectrum camera. The construction also looks very good. The seller is based in US, but I think will ship to other countries. To find these filters, search in eBay for S8612 or RG665 filters. One such link is for the S8612 in 25.5mm: Schott S8612 UV/IR Cut Filter 25.5mm "Hot Mirror" Visual Bandpass IR Suppression | eBay

    The S8612 filter is a very good IR-cut filter which can be used for visible-light photography and functions similarly to the BG38/BG39/BG40 (but lets more UV through), or stacked with a UV-pass filter like UG1 or UG11 to make a UV-imaging filter. The RG665 is the 665nm IR-filter which is very popular for IR photography, and in the past has been rather rare and difficult to get hold of.

    BT
     
  2. slothead

    slothead Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 14, 2012
    Frederick, MD
    Boon,
    I have heard that term "full-spectrum" camera, but I am not entirely sure what the term means. I have recently sent off an E-P2 to be converted to an IR (665nm) camera, but since it is filtered with a 665nm filter, it is not a "full-spectrum" is it? So how do you convert a camera to full-spectrum?
     
  3. usayit

    usayit Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Full-spectrum => clear class over sensor.
     
  4. slothead

    slothead Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 14, 2012
    Frederick, MD
    I'm assuming you meant "clear glass over sensor." But "clear glass" usually has a optical property. Can you be more specific about what you mean by "clear?"
     
  5. usayit

    usayit Mu-43 Hall of Famer

  6. usayit

    usayit Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Honestly, the prices on that ebay seller are pretty on par with what you will find at BH and Adorama.
     
  7. slothead

    slothead Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 14, 2012
    Frederick, MD
  8. tbyork2012

    tbyork2012 Mu-43 Veteran

    213
    Nov 14, 2012
    Oxford, UK
    The mod all depends on what you intend to use the camera for. 665nm is probably the best filter to use for IR, as the effect after channel swap is the most pleasing.

    But keeping the camera full spectrum will allow for you to image in whichever spectrum you prefer, by using an appropriate filter e.g. Baader U for UV, S8612 for visible, RG665, 720nm, 850nm, 950nm for IR depending on the effect you would like to achieve.
     
  9. Capt T

    Capt T Mu-43 Regular

    45
    Aug 8, 2010
    Went with a Full Spectrum for my EPM1. Just received it last week. Have not had much time to play with it yet. But hopefully in the next couple of days.

    Went that route for experimentation. Already have quite a few filters. Was looking at a few from that seller, to pick up.
     
  10. beanedsprout

    beanedsprout Mu-43 Veteran

    429
    Apr 13, 2013
    north central Ohio
    Just picked up a full spectrum EPM1 yesterday before I saw this thread today. Also got some Schott glass, however I got a 2x2 square for $10 shipped. Hopefully it will work, otherwise I'll go with the $60 hot mirror filter. I might take my square to a glass shop and have them make a 52mm filter out of it, I'll probably end up using my Panny 14-42 kit lens on it, got some IR filters that I use with film already.

    The camera is full spectrum but I don't have any quartz lenses and I'm not going to spend the $4000 to get one, so it'll be IR and visible spectrum only. Should arrive in a few days, I'll post some pictures to show it off.
     
  11. beanedsprout

    beanedsprout Mu-43 Veteran

    429
    Apr 13, 2013
    north central Ohio
    Also, where do you get a 665nm filter? The lowest I've got is 720
     
  12. Petrochemist

    Petrochemist Mu-43 Top Veteran

    651
    Mar 21, 2013
    N Essex, UK
    Mike
    You can get UV images with cheap lenses. Use lenses with only small amounts of glass (simple C mounts or enlarging lenses should be OK).
    Filters needn't be to expensive either, but bare in mind the standard U330 and similar transmit IR too, so need to be backed up with a IR blocking filter such as BG39.
     
  13. tbyork2012

    tbyork2012 Mu-43 Veteran

    213
    Nov 14, 2012
    Oxford, UK
  14. kds315

    kds315 Mu-43 Regular

    149
    Apr 6, 2010
    Weinheim, Germany
    Unfortunately as per my todays knowledge I would rate this last sentence as rather misleading, as it is not that simple.
    There are a few good + relatively cheap lenses for UV, look here on my BLOG on the link list (right side).
    I have measured + tested many (>100), but only found very few suitable ones, like EL-Nikkor 5.6/80mm + 105mm
     
  15. Petrochemist

    Petrochemist Mu-43 Top Veteran

    651
    Mar 21, 2013
    N Essex, UK
    Mike
    Klaus I suspect that few users will ever get anywhere near your level of expertise with UV, but for most of us inferior qualities will be acceptable.
    Focus shift is much less of an issue with µ4/3 cameras, and the sharpness will probably improve for those of us forced to use cheaper more monochromatic UV lighting. Admittedly flare resistance & hot spots will potentially be an issue, but contrast is easily boosted in post processing.

    Your X lenses would no doubt prove better, but they can be difficult to track down - I blame those who have read your blog :smile: I was trying to give simple guidelines for reasonable lenses rather than the ideal ones you've listed.

    If my post was misleading in this then I apologise :sorry:!
     
  16. kds315

    kds315 Mu-43 Regular

    149
    Apr 6, 2010
    Weinheim, Germany
    Mike, my X-lenses are specifically calibrated lenses and have nothing to do with the ones I haves tested and posted about - those latter ones can be had anywhere. Testing also included sharpness, contrast and flare resistence testing (+ hotspots), so all the few found met the criteria.

    Your "simple guidelines" unfortunately don't hold true, hence my comment. I have not found just one well working c-mount lens, and most enlarger lenses do not transmit UV sufficiently. Why have someone invest, try out and be disappointed, when looking for the right + tested good lens would yield a satisfactory result? Those mentioned (on my BLOG) good ones are plenty and easy to find.
     
  17. tbyork2012

    tbyork2012 Mu-43 Veteran

    213
    Nov 14, 2012
    Oxford, UK
    How about the Hamamatsu UV lens you have, Klaus? Isn't that a C-mount lens? But as you say, in general c-mount lenses are not good for UV.

    There are many more enlarger lenses which are not suitable for UV-imaging, than those which are useable. So looking through Klaus' blog is a good start to prevent wasting money on something unsuitable.
     
  18. tbyork2012

    tbyork2012 Mu-43 Veteran

    213
    Nov 14, 2012
    Oxford, UK
    " those of us forced to use cheaper more monochromatic UV lighting."
    That is not true. UV torches are actually not very cheap at all, costing over £150 for the really good ones with Nichia-chip; the cheaper ones are less powerful and will require much longer exposure times. The Xenon flash, however, can be bought rather cheaply, if you hunt one down on eBay or other retailers with used camera equipment.

    For example, the Canon speedlite 199A works better than the Vivitar 283/285, is rated at a safe sync voltage <6V (unlike some of the Vivitars), can be more easily modded for UV (just remove the front fresnel lens which is held onto the front frame, simply by removing the 2 screws on the front frame). And best of all, the few I bought have cost under £20. Or if you have the Olympus FL-300R or FL-36R, these can be modded by simply removing the front fresnel lens, as the tubes are also uncoated and good for UV; sadly the FL-300R is not strong enough to do TTL in UV, although the FL-36R is.

    Or if you are willing to shoot outdoors, use the sun as your wide-band UV light source. It is free and an extremely good UV source. You just need to mount the camera on a tripod and shoot longer exposures; hopefully when it is not windy.

    BT
     
  19. kds315

    kds315 Mu-43 Regular

    149
    Apr 6, 2010
    Weinheim, Germany
    I agree on Xenon flashes Boon, BUT PLEASE BE AWARE ABOUT THE SECURITY ISSUE WHEN MODDING IT; THERE IS A DEADLY HIGH ENERGY STORED IN THE INTERNAL CAPACITOR IF FULLY CHARGED; SO MAKE SURE IT HAS BEEN FLASHED AND THEN SWITCHED Off IMMEDIATELY AFTERWARDS. Then remove the fresnel front lens.
     
  20. kds315

    kds315 Mu-43 Regular

    149
    Apr 6, 2010
    Weinheim, Germany
    Boon, that lens is not a "normal" c-mount lens, ultra rare, $$$$ so I haven't counted that one in.