Filters for E-M5

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by musichouse, Aug 1, 2012.

  1. musichouse

    musichouse New to Mu-43

    Aug 1, 2012
    I am the owner of a new E-M5. I have the 12-50 kit lens + the f1.8 45mm lens. What is the most economical way to get a circular polarizer and a ND filter for these lens'? Any recommendation for brands that are affordable? Thanks.
  2. mister_roboto

    mister_roboto Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Jun 14, 2011
    Seattle, WA, USA
    Real Name:
    12-50 uses 52mm filters, and the 45 uses 37mm filters.

    Although I know you want cheap- I'd recommend getting a better quality filter. Cheap filters are very noticeably cheap. I personally prefer Hoya, B+W myself.

    Although they are cheaper, Kenko makes not that bad of filters.
  3. Bokeaji

    Bokeaji Gonzo's Dad O.*

    Aug 6, 2011
    Austin, TX
    Google something like lens filter test or review. You can see how bad your photos will come out with a cheap filter. Just save up longer and get a nice multi coated good brand. Srsly....srsly....:)
  4. Pennington

    Pennington Mu-43 Regular

    You don't need a circular polarizer - a plain linear polarizer works just fine with the CD-AF system. They tend to be a bit cheaper.

    I got 52mm filters, with the idea that I might get a Oly 9-18mm someday. In the meantime, I have stepdown rings to 46mm and 37mm for my P45, P25, and 14-42mm lenses. It was a pretty cheap setup altogether.

    Prior to this, I had used Cokin filters with my Canon system, but none of their series seemed to be a great fit for m4:3.
  5. newbert

    newbert Mu-43 Veteran

    Jul 22, 2012
    Glens Falls, NY
    +1. I can confirm that all you need is a linear polarizer with the EM-5. I bought a relatively cheap (approx $28) Hoya to use with my 12-50 lens and it does an excellent job.

    I'm told that linear polarizers are all that's needed (as opposed to circular polarizers) with any mirrorless system. (But I can't confirm that...)
  6. riverr02

    riverr02 Mu-43 Veteran

    May 2, 2011
    New York
    Real Name:
  7. Ross the fiddler

    Ross the fiddler Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 20, 2012
    Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia
    Real Name:
    I recommend using step down adapters (or is it step up?) cheap off ebay, for the smaller lens & just use the one filter to suit the larger lens.
  8. twokatmew

    twokatmew Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 1, 2012
    Lansing, MI, US
    Real Name:
    Marumi makes high quality multi-coated filters at reasonable prices. I got 52mm filters & use step-up rings for my 45/1.8 & 14-42 plus step-down for my 40-150. No vignetting on the latter, due to its large front element.

    Sent from my ADR6350 using Tapatalk 2
  9. Sanpaku

    Sanpaku Mu-43 Regular

    Jul 24, 2012
    My current plan for my new E-M5 µ43 system is two filters: a 2-8 stop ND fader, and a linear polarizer, in 58mm, and cheap step up rings for any smaller lenses I plan on acquiring.

    Variable ND "fader" filters work by rotating a linear polarizer over another, and 2-8 stops from a variable ND filter cost about the same as a fixed 10 stop motion smearing ND filter. Faders are subject to cross-shaped effects if you have them almost exactly at 90° to one another (maximum stops). Call it a feature or a bug...

    58mm is the second largest filter size of any current µ43 lens, used by the pricey 12-35mm, 75-300mm, and 75mm; only the 100-300mm is larger at 67mm. I don't know when (or if) I'll get any of those lenses, but the cost is about the same as for 52mm filters, and perhaps the larger diameter will prevent filter vignetting with other lenses.

    From our sponsor B&H, I'm looking at:

    Light Craft Workshop 58mm Fader ND Mark II Filter $78.00
    Hoya 58mm Linear Polarizer Glass Filter $25.00
    Generic 37mm-58mm Step-Up Ring $6.95
    Generic 46mm-58mm Step-Up Ring $6.95
    Generic 52mm-58mm Step-Up Ring $6.95