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Film Scanner Questions (Canoscan 9000f vs developers)

Discussion in 'Other Systems' started by KS11, Aug 6, 2012.

  1. KS11

    KS11 Mu-43 Veteran

    411
    Jan 31, 2011
    Busan/Hong Kong
    Hi all, I have a conundrum here regarding my newly purchased canoscan 9000f.

    the scanned pictures are not as good as the industrial style scanners my local developer uses.

    for instance here is their scan: (at 72dpi)



    compared to my canoscan 9000f at (1200 dpi)



    even after PP i cannot get the same sharpness, color, contrast, and range of the develop scan, is there some setting i can do to get at least 80%-90% of what the develop scan looks like?

    this is the first time i owned a 35mm film scanner so I would appreciate what some of your settings are and what dpi usually (settings etc) you scan at.

    Thanks in advance :redface:
     
  2. sprinke

    sprinke Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 5, 2011
    Pasadena, CA
    Debi
    It's likely they they are doing post-processing ...
     
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  3. With_Eyes_Unclouded

    With_Eyes_Unclouded Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 17, 2012
    Vassilios
    Since I cannot examine a crop of your images for detail, I cannot comment on the level of detail each method manages to capture.

    But, from what I can see, there is a white balance adjustment in one of the two photos.

    If those are scans from color positive film, you can examine the original with a loop and see which of the two alternatives comes closer to "reality". But, apart from that, any photo we scan, then gets into the digital workflow domain. Which means, post processing.
     
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  4. supermaxv

    supermaxv Mu-43 Veteran

    273
    Sep 20, 2011
    With_Eyes_Unclouded is right, fixing the white balance will go a long way to getting your scan matching the developer's one.
     
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  5. KS11

    KS11 Mu-43 Veteran

    411
    Jan 31, 2011
    Busan/Hong Kong
    definitely thanks all for the advice!! the WB was the biggest thing,

    using photoshop elements that came with the scanner, i managed to squeeze this out,



    i remember sharpening it up, removing the blues in the WB, and something else about the contrast, now i need to save this as a preset (batch process?) for future use so i don't need to do this every time...ug, have to do some reading in the manual.

    as far as i can tell/google photoshop elements doesn't have this feature (as in save history of changes as a preset?)
     
  6. With_Eyes_Unclouded

    With_Eyes_Unclouded Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 17, 2012
    Vassilios
    Glad you're getting the groove of it!

    Please remember that JPGs are not as forgiving in PP, whatever software you use. It'd be better if you scanned in TIFF (don't know if you've done that already). Apart from that, I prefer to NOT allow the scanning software add any sharpening, contrast, etc. I add them (if needed) in LR4.
     
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  7. KS11

    KS11 Mu-43 Veteran

    411
    Jan 31, 2011
    Busan/Hong Kong
    Actually a good point I don't remember which file format I was scanning in, in sure that would make a big difference as well! Thanks much I think I should be able to do that then!

    Time to stock up on film now!

    (buy film not megapixels!!)
     
  8. Paul Amyes

    Paul Amyes Mu-43 Regular

    66
    Dec 27, 2011
    Hobart, Tasmania
    The main thing to get used to is that the main purpose of the scan is to extract as much info from the neg as possible. So to do this you need to record as much shadow and high light detail as you can by using a low contrast setting, switching off dust reduction (it softens the images) and saving as a 16 bit TIFF. Then in PS you can play around with the contrast etc to produce what you want. Many regard scanning as an arcane science but if you stick to these principles then you'll get good results.
     
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  9. tomservoca

    tomservoca Mu-43 Regular

    28
    Jul 17, 2010
    Calgary, Alberta
    I also recommend using VueScan or SilverfastAI rather than the mfr supplied SW

    Much more control and much better results. On a backfile conversion project I've been working on I used SilverfastAI and once I climbed up the learning curve I was very pleased with the results from my Epson V750


    Life is complex; it has real and imaginary parts.
    http://tomservoca.smugmug.com
    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  10. tomservoca

    tomservoca Mu-43 Regular

    28
    Jul 17, 2010
    Calgary, Alberta
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  11. photoSmart42

    photoSmart42 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    628
    Feb 12, 2010
    San Diego, CA
    I hope you understand that your $400 scanner can't compete with a $50,000 industrial scanner, so I think it would be best if you don't even try to compete with that. They have much better true resolution (your scanner has about 30% of the resolution your manufacturer told you it does), much better dynamic range and color bit depth, and it's more than likely been calibrated properly to match each film.

    Also realize that scanning for the most part is an art that takes some time to master, and you'll have to make time to learn it. Film has character, and it's different from film type to film type.

    Things you can do to improve your scans:
    1. Looks like you've done pretty well with a bit of PP in Photoshop Elements - good job! That's a great start.
    2. Rent a X-Rite pro from lensrentals and calibrate your monitor, your scanner, and your printer.
    3. Buy yourself an X-Rite color checker and snap your first film frame for each roll against it (you should be doing that on you digital also for best results). That way you can calibrate your scan output correctly for each film, and you build a library of calibrations for different film you use.

    Hope this helps a bit. Good luck!
     
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