Film Camera question

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by aw614, Oct 28, 2012.

  1. aw614

    aw614 Mu-43 Regular

    Mar 19, 2011
    I've been using my dad's Minolta SRT-Super, I've been having the pictures developed lately and I took a few at a car show I went to, with some expired ISO 800 film that I had already loaded on. I also took a few indoor pictures. The indoor pictures I took, looked fine, but the outdoor pictures from the car show I went to look a bit odd with the right side fairly dark. Any idea what this could be? The pictures I took from the car show were near the end of the roll of film. My friend told me it could be a sticky shutter at faster shutter speeds?
    This one came out ok at the show
    Here is an indoor shot I took on the same roll. 13_0014.
  2. mister_roboto

    mister_roboto Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Jun 14, 2011
    Seattle, WA, USA
    Real Name:
    I think your friend is right.

    The shutter I'm assuming was set faster outside than inside with iso 800 and a sunny day- so your shutter is a little sticky or slow a the fast ends.
  3. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    I agree too - shutter issues...:frown:
  4. aw614

    aw614 Mu-43 Regular

    Mar 19, 2011
    ugh thanks, I guess I may try to get it repaired as it has sentimental value, I'll try lower iso film and also see too.
  5. kinlau

    kinlau Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Feb 29, 2012
    +1 on the sticky shutter.

    Just use slower film, and remember that you can over-expose by 3 stops on color-neg film and still be fine. The shutter might also loosen up over time.
  6. dwig

    dwig Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Jun 26, 2010
    Key West FL
    It's a shutter problem where the two independent shutter curtains are not traveling at the same speeds. It does not have anything to do with the shutter "sticking" and almost certainly will not improve with use.

    Either the second curtain is running a little fast, or more likely, the first curtain is running a bit slow. As the two travel across the neg during exposure the second is catching up with the first. These curtains travel at exactly the same speed regardless of what shutter speed is set. Changing the shutter speed changes the time delay between the release of the two curtains effectively changing the distance between their two edges. At higher speeds the gap is narrower. When the gap is narrower the effect of one catching up with the other as they travel across the image has a larger percentage change in the gap width and hence a larger effect on the exposure. Use slower films so you can avoid the higher shutter speeds.
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