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Falling to Earth

Discussion in 'Nature' started by MarkB1, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. MarkB1

    MarkB1 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    546
    Oct 30, 2010
    Australia
    Some variety from hereabouts ...

    4-p1050437-001-mark-berkery.

    5-p1050490-001-mark-berkery.

    3-p1050416-001-mark-berkery.

    2-p1050334-001-mark-berkery.

    p1020659-mark-berkery.

    p1030436-mark-berkery.
     
    • Like Like x 27
  2. justinrphillips

    justinrphillips Mu-43 Regular

    30
    Nov 2, 2012
    Mark,

    These are amazing, do you mind if I ask you what your Macro setup is? This is an area I have a lot of interest in.
     
  3. trstenjak

    trstenjak Mu-43 Regular

    45
    May 13, 2012
    Slovenia
    Tadej Trstenjak
    Excellent photos!
    No luck with insects here at my place - it is snowing at the moment :frown:


    Check his signature - Macro Illustrated.
     
  4. MarkB1

    MarkB1 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    546
    Oct 30, 2010
    Australia
    Thanks guys, appreciated.
     
  5. Nepherim

    Nepherim Mu-43 Regular

    68
    May 27, 2012
    NJ, USA
    Wow, all very good, but the first one really stands out, very sharp, nice composition, and very dynamic.

    Update: just read your blog, also excellent, thanks!
     
  6. RevBob

    RevBob Super Moderator

    Jun 4, 2011
    NorthWestern PA
    Bob
    Absolutely beautiful photos! :bravo-009:
     
  7. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    MarkA1-

    Just where, on God's earth, do you find all these wonderful creatures? Do you travel and seek them out or do they find you in your yard?
     
  8. redington

    redington Mu-43 Regular

    140
    Apr 28, 2012
    Fantastic - I love #5 in particular.
     
  9. MarkB1

    MarkB1 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    546
    Oct 30, 2010
    Australia
    I populate a small garden with flowering plants that feed all sorts of insects and keep them watered, no insecticide ever, minimal maintenance and never waste the green waste. Some plants die and many, like the SunFlowers, are continually seeded in the available places. It can be a lot of work at times but after a while the garden evolved it's own rhythm that I just follow - and still put the time in, and the effort.

    Also there is a great place for roosting bees not far away where I also find other creatures. It's been dry a while now so very few have hatched but I am not impatient - anymore. :)

    I also provide habitat and nesting material/locations, part of not wasting the waste. Nature has no waste anyway ...

     
  10. MarkB1

    MarkB1 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    546
    Oct 30, 2010
    Australia
    Thanks all, appreciated.

    Best ... M

     
  11. sam_m

    sam_m Mu-43 Regular

    182
    Jul 26, 2010
    wow!, fantastic shots, great work Mark
     
  12. Ross the fiddler

    Ross the fiddler Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Some more great macro photos Mark. I love your work. :2thumbs:
     
  13. Kiwi Paul

    Kiwi Paul Mu-43 Top Veteran

    729
    Aug 15, 2011
    Aberdeen Scotland
    Excellent stuff, very inspirational!!

    Paul
     
  14. Iansky

    Iansky Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 26, 2009
    The Cotswolds, UK
    Mark, these images are stunning and should be fronting magazines as well as hanging in a gallery.

    I would love to know what set up you use for these?

    Keep them coming,
    Ian
     
  15. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    So you shoot mainly from the yard, good stuff. I have a similar philosophy of no green waste. I compost nearly everything (except the rose canes, thorns and grandchildren don't mix). I have a little vermiculture operation going on, which I use non-meat leftovers as a feed stock. The longer trimmed branches from the trees are used as construction material for trellises and such. The importation of a large number of butterfly and Hummingbird attracting plants keeps these creatures in the yard all year long. I even use the hair from the dog's brush to stock a nesting material depot. Like yourself, no pesticides.

    I think I need to arm myself with a macro and explore the yard. Thanks for the inspiration.

    Gary
     
  16. Ross the fiddler

    Ross the fiddler Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Click on the link in his signature & you will be surprised how one does not have to go overboard with equipment to get images like this.
     
  17. MarkB1

    MarkB1 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    546
    Oct 30, 2010
    Australia
    Thanks Ian. I tried selling, even mounted and matted, wrapped all professional-like and maybe covered costs - a market stall at w/ends. The one market where I am assured of sales is 300k away. Couldn't be bribed to do 'Stock'. I have not had any serious interest from publishers, probably put off by my 'philosophy' - don't know why. I think one really has to work at getting published and I really don't care enough to spend my time and energy at it.

    Exif is usually in my pix. I still use the FZ50 + achromats stacked with snooted and diffused on board flash, variable for varying WD's. JPG's out of cam and 20sec's in Picasa and ten de-noising (absolutely necessary with the FZ) finishes them off. It's all explained in my sig link - will get around to updating it some time.

    If Pany ever really come out with the FZ50/30 evolved I will be on it like a fly to s***. :)

     
  18. MarkB1

    MarkB1 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    546
    Oct 30, 2010
    Australia
    Thanks guys, appreciated. Assuming guys there ... :)

     
  19. MarkB1

    MarkB1 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    546
    Oct 30, 2010
    Australia
    Yes, except for native bees that are only found in the bush. Sounds like you have everything you need in the garden - sounds a bit like mine, though I rent :eek: , for macro. Butterfly's and HummingBirds are another matter, but still doable with my gear - modified.

    Whatever you have, a macro lens is nearly always best for close-ups. With an achromat (or two) you can really get down to it. Most believe you need distance or extreme proximity for macro but I find 2" ideal for most. At that WD I can hold the 'thing' the creature is on and really control the shot, especially effective at dawn and dusk - the heat of the day is for rest at my age and condition. :)

    At longer WD's without a 'pod' or other stabilising structure I use a stick in such a way as to mimic the stability of a tripod, one knee down, other foot out, leaning slightly on stick placed at appropriate location and hand grip up or down for angling, etc ...