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fairies exist

Discussion in 'Astrophotography' started by Cederic, May 8, 2018.

  1. Cederic

    Cederic Mu-43 Veteran

    482
    Nov 14, 2012
    Nottingham
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  2. millhoud

    millhoud Mu-43 Regular

    69
    Jun 25, 2014
    Trieste
    I think the tree shows (lower right corner) a distinct shadow, so a kind of double exposure, thus camera movement. The bright paths seem different but are actually the same. May i guess the camera was on some table or similar?
     
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  3. rloewy

    rloewy Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    May 5, 2014
    Ron
    Maybe they are preparing the sky to photograph one of them star constellations books ;) 
     
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  4. TNcasual

    TNcasual Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Dec 2, 2014
    Knoxville, TN
    There is movement in the frame, other than the lights. It could be wind movement or camera shake. Since you can see stars through the tree, something moved there.

    As for the light trails, I have no idea. Some of the shape appears to be copied twice, maybe three times. Odd.

    Where there fireflies present?
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2018
  5. Egregius V

    Egregius V Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    458
    Jun 14, 2015
    Massachusetts, USA
    Rev. Gregory Vozzo
    Was IBIS on? Timed shutter release or immediate? What was the camera mounted/resting on?

    There was camera movement of some kind, which was brief rather than continuous. I'm supposing the trails correspond to the brightest, most visible stars in the sky. Long exposure with sudden movement light-painted the sensor in this squarish pattern. The camera probably didn't quite make it back to its original position. So I'm guessing you had the camera on a tripod and pressed the shutter without setting a timer delay first.
     
  6. Lcrunyon

    Lcrunyon Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Jun 4, 2014
    Maryland
    Loren
    I think I see a space ship.
     
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  7. Speedliner

    Speedliner Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 2, 2015
    Southern NJ, USA
    Rob
    If it was due to camera movement all of the stars would have painted a similar path, so it’s clearly a UFO. :) 

    No explanation here. There are some other lines in the image. Thought maybe an insect, but the lines and angles are so sharp...got me.
     
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  8. millhoud

    millhoud Mu-43 Regular

    69
    Jun 25, 2014
    Trieste
    They are similar, they cannot be exactly alike because the movement is composed of rotation as well as translation. And as somebody else already said only the brightest stars could produce trails.
     
  9. TNcasual

    TNcasual Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Dec 2, 2014
    Knoxville, TN
    The more I think about this, I think it is all due to movement. Probably from pushing the shutter button. The brightest stars had the movement, then as the camera set still for the duration of the shutter, the rest filled in.

    OP should take the RAW and bring up the exposure a great deal. I bet you will see some other trails, all having similar, but not exact shapes.
     
  10. Mikehit

    Mikehit Mu-43 Veteran

    290
    Jan 26, 2018
    Camera shake.
    There are stars that have lines parallel to the main bright light (bottom of the frame just right of middle, let edge just in from the middle) - I think it is just that most of the stars are too faint for the lines of movement to have been recorded and easily visible.
     
  11. Cederic

    Cederic Mu-43 Veteran

    482
    Nov 14, 2012
    Nottingham
    Just brightened it up a lot and there aren't the lines for the fainter stars. However, the same movement pattern is definitely repeated multiple times, so the 'camera moved then settled' suggestion looks like a good one here.

    I guess I hadn't tightened the screws on the tripod's ball head properly before pressing the shutter.

    Thanks for the suggestions :) 
     
  12. ac12

    ac12 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    850
    Apr 24, 2018
    Got to use a remote/cable release for this kind of stuff, so that you don't touch (and shake) the camera.
     
  13. Giiba

    Giiba Something to someone somewhere Subscribing Member

    Aug 19, 2016
    New Westminster, BC
    As well, use a delayed shutter like the electronic or first curtain electronic available on many models. This allows the whole system to settle before exposure begins.

    Even the sturdiest of tripods will have vibration present as you handle and release the camera.
     
  14. ToxicTabasco

    ToxicTabasco Mu-43 Top Veteran

    827
    Jul 2, 2018
    South West USA
    Grab hold of your tin foil hats and tighten up your boots. I have the same experience.

    UFO? I can't explain what that is, can't ID the object or the cause of those drifting lines.

    However, I shoot a lot of time lapse every year for the past several years. Some go 3 to 6 hours long into the night. My goal is usually Milky Way time lapse, and multi shot panoramas for the horizon shot. The tools were DSLRs with fast wide and ultra wide lenses.

    From time to time, I do encounter stuff like comets, sattlelites, meteors, fireballs in addition to the various aircraft that leave trails and blinking lights. And, I shoot on the darkest nights in the darkest skies of the South West areas of the Mojave Desert and Death Valley and in California, Nevada, Arizona and Utah.

    What brings me to this thread was my own encounter with a similar squiggly line and cluster of lights. While at Vermilion Cliffs Condor viewing area on a dark moonless September 2018 night. I set up the GX85 for some test runs in long duration time lapse. It was only the 2nd attempt at dark night time lapse for this camera. I'd been pretty successful with the LX100, so I figure this one can handle the long exposures and high ISO. The lens a Panasonic 12-35 f/2.8 OIS II. Shutter was 13 seconds, ISO 3200 at f/2.8 12mm. On tripod, no IBIS.

    The first time laps on a full battery started at 12 midnight, and ran to 0214hrs. The camera was on a small tripod low on the ground next to the drivers window so I could know when to change batteries. At about 0230 I replaced the battery, and initiated the time lapse.

    Once on the computer, I edited and process for the time lapse, and went through each shot to find the keepers (comets, meteors, fireballs, etc...) on the second time lapse on shot 4 were these strange cluster of lights and squiggly lines. The first time ever seeing them. Have no idea what they are or what caused them.

    You can see it on both sides of the milky way and above it. Not my best work of the milky way, and not the ideal time of year for milky way, and it was a test run for the GX85.
    14 Sep Vermillion TL2-4.jpg
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    Here are some zoomed in shot of the one on the left
    UFO Left.jpg
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    Here's the one on the right
    UFO Right.jpg
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    I have no clue what these are. But, I do know it can't be camera movement, as every thing would have the same pattern of movement. Does the camera see things we can't?

    I ruled out several things that could have caused this. Bugs are ruled out because there are no known fire files in this desert area, plus the winds were pretty constant at about 10 mph, and no light source to reflect off the bugs other than the starlight. Choppers are ruled out as they wouldn't have this pattern going on in 3 different locations during the 13 exposure, and would have green and red blinking lights. We can rule out camera movement because there was no ground shake and if there was camera movement all the bright stars would have the same pattern of movement which is not the case here.

    Has anyone else seen this pattern of lights on their night sky long exposures?
    Let me know what you think, what could these light be?
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2019
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  15. Bushboy

    Bushboy Mu-43 Veteran

    426
    Apr 22, 2018
    NZ
    Charlie
    It is not, an alien spaceship.
    They travel in straight lines...
     
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  16. Giiba

    Giiba Something to someone somewhere Subscribing Member

    Aug 19, 2016
    New Westminster, BC
    What's really weird is that the two are the same squiggly pattern. Like it is some sort of lens flare from a waving flashlight, mirrored in two locations..
     
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  17. ToxicTabasco

    ToxicTabasco Mu-43 Top Veteran

    827
    Jul 2, 2018
    South West USA
    Could be, but I didn't have a flash light or any light source out during that time. It was shot #4 of time lapse. So likely 2 minutes into the time lapse. by then, I was back in the car warming up with a blanket. Also, there's a third cluster on the top of the milky way, with similar pattern. Thus could be a lens flare reflection of some kind.

    Now that I look more closely zoomed in, I see a similar pattern of light in the upper left side.
     
  18. Hair on the sensor??
     
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  19. Giiba

    Giiba Something to someone somewhere Subscribing Member

    Aug 19, 2016
    New Westminster, BC
    Yeah, if you were shooting an uwa or fisheye I would quickly call it flare catching a bulbous front element, but the 12-35/2.8 isn't exactly a bulbous lens...

    But it must be some sort of flare, it is in the picture 4 times that I can see (one in each quadrant). Perhaps a light from the car? A headlamp? Headlights from far away (I've had this happens, but not showing up 4 times)?

    Meh, drunken ufo seems the simplest explanation :laugh:
     
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  20. Egregius V

    Egregius V Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    458
    Jun 14, 2015
    Massachusetts, USA
    Rev. Gregory Vozzo
    It's camera movement - or maybe IBIS (internal movement). As with the first case, the pattern repeats all over the picture (look very closely), with the brightest objects showing the longest trails. It might be hard to determine why it happened, but I'm quite sure that's what happened. The length of exposure is the giveaway.

    So, I think the real question for the X-files is, what moved the camera? :D 
     
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