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Exposure Aid

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by Dave in Wales, Dec 29, 2014.

  1. Dave in Wales

    Dave in Wales Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 5, 2011
    West Wales
    Exposure Aid....UPDATE

    Been playing around with a gizmo made from the bottom cut out of a styrafoam plate...about 5" x 4"

    When held in contact with the lens the incident light readings are the same as reflective light readings from a 18% grey card.
    Not too sure about incident WB readings yet, more tests to do.
    It can however double for taking reflective WB readings.


    Diff. by Dave in Wales, on Flickr

    UPDATE...
    As was suggested, I did indeed buy an incident light meter, a Sekonic L-308S.
    A beautiful thing I have to say, but alas no more accurate than the bottom of my styrafoam plate.
    They both gave exactly the same readings for incident light.
    It goes back tomorrow, I cannot justify keeping it.
    Just have to figure out a more elegant solution for holding the plate, or a piece of, in front of my lenses.
    16204291435_0963fd867c_z.
    L-308s by Dave in Wales, on Flickr
     
  2. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    Might be easier just to buy an incident light meter - it's sure more portable :wink:
     
  3. Dave in Wales

    Dave in Wales Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 5, 2011
    West Wales
    LM's cost ££££££, this cost nowt and just slips into me bag ;-))))
     
  4. Carbonman

    Carbonman Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jul 10, 2014
    Vancouver BC
    Graham
    Another quick & dirty metering solution is to aim your camera at the palm of your hand - it's about 36% reflectance regardless of race. Open up one stop and you're good to go.
     
  5. Itchybiscuit

    Itchybiscuit Photon Mangler

    512
    Dec 10, 2013
    Glasgow, Scotland
    Ivor
    I used to do that with my film cameras if I was shooting upwards and the sky was just too bright. :thumbup:
     
  6. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    If you want to do it properly and easily, just get an X-rite ColorChecker.
     
  7. Dave in Wales

    Dave in Wales Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 5, 2011
    West Wales
    Update...se above.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 10, 2010
    Southport, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    uhm .... shoot a shot, review the histogram, expose to avoid clipping (or shadow bias as you prefer)

    use manual exposure to ensure all shots are consistent ... I mean unless you're using E6 film
     
  9. Dave in Wales

    Dave in Wales Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 5, 2011
    West Wales
    What is the point......The reading from both instruments were taken from exactly the same position into exactly the same lighting source, an overcast sky.
    Both devices were set at ISO 8000.
    The camera set on manual with the styrafoam plate held in contact with the front of the lens, no light could creep around the sides.
    Both devices gave exactly the same reading 1/250 @ f5.6.
     
  10. fortwodriver

    fortwodriver Mu-43 Top Veteran

    959
    Nov 15, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Frank
    Hmmm... How thick is the piece? You could buy a Cokin filter holder, cut a piece to size and slide it in or gaffer-tape it to the front to do what you're doing if you really want to do things that way. The filter holder snaps onto a ring you leave mounted to the lens.

    Cokin stuff is cheap - and well, you may find it's a lot of fun. Although, their resin filters are quite delicate and aren't optically great, but definitely cheap fun.
     
  11. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 10, 2010
    Southport, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    the point is you need no further equipment than your camera. After all, the purpose of tools for setting exposure is to determine a good exposure ... no?
     
  12. Dave in Wales

    Dave in Wales Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 5, 2011
    West Wales
    Cokin, thanks I hadn't though of that.