EXIF database software

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by Wasabi Bob, Jun 21, 2012.

  1. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Saw a discussion of software that categorized photos by EXIF data categories, such as the effective focal length you shoot at. Does anyone recall the name of the software? This software would help you identify your shooting trends.
     
  2. jloden

    jloden Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 15, 2012
    Hunterdon County, NJ
    Jay
    Not sure if this is the thread you were referring to: Crunching the Numbers on Focal Lengths but I started that one recently for discussing the same topic. If you're on Windows, there's ExposurePlot, and if you use LightRoom you can also do a lot of stuff with the metadata available there.

    I couldn't find a standalone app for OS X and I didn't have LightRoom yet (most of my photos are in iPhoto still), so I just ended up writing a very basic script I can run from a terminal session that tells me the distribution of focal lengths in my shots by analyzing metadada with an EXIF library.
     
  3. pholcid

    pholcid New to Mu-43

    6
    Apr 25, 2012
    Pacific Northwest
    Phil Harvey's free exiftool is the gold standard, but it's command line only. Cross platform for mac/linux/windows. Installation is easy on mac/linux, probably on windows. Using it may or may not be easy, depending on exactly what you want to do. There are a few guis around but they only cover tiny subsets of its full power.

    ExifTool by Phil Harvey

    Many common options are pretty easy to learn, and there's a user forum that's friendly to non-techie beginners.

    an example from the documentation that should be close to what you want to do--just import the output file to a spreadsheet:

    exiftool -T -createdate -aperture -shutterspeed -iso dir > out.txt

    List specified meta information in tab-delimited column form for all images in dir to an output text file named ``out.txt''.


    exiftool will show you tons more metadata than most photo editors will. It also provides some nice custom calculations, such as the DoF, if the camera supplies enough data such as focus distance.

    If you're on a Mac, it's easy to use Automator to set up droplets and services to apply common scenarios to selected files. There are several tutorials floating around.
     
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  4. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Thanks

    Exposure Plot was the program, but I was hoping that it would ID the lens that was used. I've got about 700 photos that were shot with different lens. Trying to figure out which lens is getting the most / least use.

    I appreciate the responses!
     
  5. jloden

    jloden Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 15, 2012
    Hunterdon County, NJ
    Jay
    Yeah, LightRoom will do that if you have it, you can go to the Library mode and look at the Metadata section and see how many photos are categorized under each lens. You can get a free trial of LightRoom for 30 days, so you could always install it to play around with for a month and find out the info you need too :smile:
     
  6. pholcid

    pholcid New to Mu-43

    6
    Apr 25, 2012
    Pacific Northwest
    Assuming that your camera bothers to write the data to the file (or can--if you use an adapter, the camera doesn't know) exiftool can do it easily:

    exiftool -T -LensInfo -r topdir > out.txt

    (-r has it go through an entire directory tree)

    OM-D reports the 12-50 as 12-50mm f/3.5-6.3

    There's a lot of useful metadata such as focus distance that Aperture doesn't bother to tell me about, maybe Lightroom is better. For amusement, I dumped all available data from an OM-D raw file:

    http://pholcid.fastmail.us/omd-raw-metadata.txt

    [Composite] values are calculated by exiftool, they aren't actually in the file.

    A lot of the stuff is instructions for processing the raw data, but I wonder if these two are indications of a future feature:

    ManometerPressure : 0 kPa
    ManometerReading : 0 m, 0 ft
     
  7. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Great tips
    Very much appreciated!
     
  8. inkista

    inkista Mu-43 Veteran

    332
    Jan 13, 2012
    San Diego, CA
    Try PhotoStats.

    If you're using Lightroom, there's a donationware plugin called LensTagger that's built on top of exiftool to writes lens and film information into a photo's EXIF. It's a bit of a pain to use, but a lot more convenient than command line. And it will store a list of your lenses for repeat use. Just be aware that fields don't auto populate or generate when you expect them to, and you have to hit buttons. Also that you need to wait for the exiftool run to finish and then reload the photo's metadata in LR (as I said, a bit of a pain).
     
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  9. jloden

    jloden Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 15, 2012
    Hunterdon County, NJ
    Jay
    I'll check out PhotoStats, thanks! It requires LightRoom and iPhoto libraries to work from, but fortunately those are the two apps I've used so that works out, haha.

    LensTagger is also handy, I've been using it to tag photos taken with the Voigtlander 25mm and 17.5mm I rented, so I can at least sort my photos by lens & focal length. I'm not anal enough to write down aperture info for photos I take for tagging later though :wink: Will come in really handy when I start using old manual lenses. The only warning/caveat which I found out the hard way is that if you use "read metadata from file" after retagging with LensTagger, it resets any editing you've done on the image.