EPM2 or EPL6?

Discussion in 'This or That? (MFT only)' started by SSmith, Dec 14, 2016.

  1. EPM2

    2 vote(s)
    12.5%
  2. EPL6

    1 vote(s)
    6.3%
  3. OM-D

    13 vote(s)
    81.3%
  1. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    Some reasons an EPL6 is not the best for this purpose:
    1) as someone else mentioned, adjusting settings on an EPL6 takes longer, thereby removing critical-response flexibility
    2) The EPL6 cannot reasonably carry a good flash head. Even if put in a flash frame, it would be quite odd to handle
    3) AF could be better (the upper end EM series would be a better choice, because you only get 1-shot at a lot of this stuff)
    4) Can't grip an EPL6. A grip helps for holding for a wedding for a long time. The camera needs to be ever ready at a wedding, not in a pocket, etc. Also, a proper battery grip gives you extra battery
    5) higher end (=more surety) would also be to use a body with dual card slots, so you don't face card failure (again, think once-in-a-lifetime shots)

    Reasons the kit lens is sub-par
    1) very limited DOF control.
    2) small aperture. If you go to 42mm, you are now at f/5.6, so unless you are outside, ISO has to jack way up. As ISO goes up DR and color response drops. You could move to a flash, but then you are at #2, above
    3) Color and contrast on the kit are OK. You can do better for a once-in-a-lifetime shot. Same with sharpness

    Overall, two bodies is better than one. A 70-200 (or equivalent) on one, and a wider, brighter zoom or prime on the other. The class is a 24-70/2.8 and 70-200/2.8 (in FF terms). It's a big reason those two lens exist. Once you go to those lenses, you need a body (or two) that can manage them.
     
  2. SSmith

    SSmith Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Dec 14, 2016
    See, that wasn't hard at all. Now I can consider these options. So, should I rent a OM-D if I can? And which lens is best to rent?



     
  3. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    lol -- I actually don't owe you answers, my friend.

    Good luck with your research.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  4. SSmith

    SSmith Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Dec 14, 2016
    How rude....but anyway, you could've EASILY rolled on by. Have a good day.
     
  5. JanW

    JanW Mu-43 Regular

    I completely agree with WT21. We will happily give you advice but you don't seem to appreciate it. Especially your comment on WT21s post was not a 'thank you' but a 'now I get what I asked for'.
    Of course we can roll on by but that would leave your questions unanswered.
    I hope our remarks have helped you a little.
    Please browse the forum, do your research and learn A LOT about m4/3 gear.
     
  6. SSmith

    SSmith Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Dec 14, 2016
    Actually, I appreciate GOOD FEEDBACK not rudeness. I'm all for suggestions and deep explanation but there are several condescending posts here with the implication that I'm unintelligent. If one camera is better than the others or if there is room for improvement, feel free to share. Leave the attitudes elsewhere.
     
  7. Cr0b4r

    Cr0b4r Mu-43 Regular

    37
    Dec 4, 2013
    I have an E-PM2 and have not used the kit zoom after I got my 17mm 1.8 and 45mm 1.8 lens. The difference in IQ is huge even for my untrained eyes. It definitely makes me want to take more photos especially since the number of keepers shot way up (plus I know how to use/take photos better now). Anyways, I guess my suggestion would be spend the money on a lens.

    Also, you may have already experienced this, but taking photos indoors was/is a pain even with a better lens. So you may want to consider a tripod and better lighting solutions.
     
  8. SSmith

    SSmith Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Dec 14, 2016
    "Also, you may have already experienced this, but taking photos indoors was/is a pain even with a better lens. So you may want to consider a tripod and better lighting solutions."

    I'm confused. You said you used a different lens and saw improvement, but then you said taking photos indoors is not good even with a better lens.
    Can you clarify your comment a little better please? should I use the epm2 with a better quality lens or not use it at all?
     
  9. Cr0b4r

    Cr0b4r Mu-43 Regular

    37
    Dec 4, 2013
    Sorry, by "indoors" I was implying low(er) light conditions. You mentioned wedding photography and most weddings I've been to have been indoors. And in those situations of low light, I find that it is difficult to get as many good photos and my unsteady hands don't help. Therefore a tripod and/or flash would really help a lot in your photography.
     
  10. SSmith

    SSmith Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Dec 14, 2016
     
  11. rloewy

    rloewy Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 5, 2014
    Ron
    Only you know how much space you will have to work with. Usually, inside, you have less space to work with - so a 25mm will usually work better than a 45mm which will work better than 75mm - but obviously there could be some inside venues that will allow for longer lens. Clearly for the same f number, longer lens can give you better object separation - which is why the 75mm 1.8 is such a popular outdoors portrait lens.

    Generally speaking, the more light you can get - the better, I find that less than f number of 2 really works better inside - for me.

    If I were to build a wedding kit I would guess that a fast 25-30mm and a fast 40-50mm would be my first 2 lens on 2 bodies that I would carry. The first for inside, the 2nd for outdoors.

    Good options for the shorter set include anything from the Pana 25mm 1.7, Oly 25mm 1.8, Oly Pro 25mm 1.2 and Sigma 30mm 1.4

    Good options for the longer ones include the Pana 42.5 1.7, Oly 45 1.8 and if you want to go even longer - the Sigma 60mm 2.8 and Oly 75mm 1.8 come to mind.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2016
  12. Cr0b4r

    Cr0b4r Mu-43 Regular

    37
    Dec 4, 2013
    There are so many lens... where to begin :)
    I think the first one many will tell you is the olympus 45mm f1.8. Its great for portraits. Again, I'm no professional, but I've received the most complements from this lens when used for portraits at gatherings (ie weddings, aniversaries, etc). Plus, its relatively cheap at $300us i think now.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  13. ahinesdesign

    ahinesdesign Mu-43 Veteran

    456
    Dec 6, 2011
    NC, USA
    Aaron
    Renting before buying is a good way to test gear before you purchase it, and I highly recommend it.

    There are a number of great primes for m43 that go well beyond the kit lenses for reasonable costs. For example, the Panasonic 14mm, 20mm, 25mm 1.7, 42.5mm 1.7, Olympus 25mm 1.8, 45mm, Sigma 30mm 1.4, and 60mm are all high value options that readily out gun the kit lenses. If you have a larger budget there are some tremendously good options that go beyond that list of primes.

    Unfortunately, the best zooms for m43 are costly - but so are the equivalent zooms for DSLRs. Yet zooms are most often used in wedding and event photography because of their versatility in fast-paced environments. Its tough to beat the Panasonic 12-35 and 35-100 or Olympus 12-40PRO and 40-150PRO combos for this kind of work.

    Several bodies with a range of primes would be a good way to go if a high-end zoom set isn't feasible.
     
  14. SSmith

    SSmith Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Dec 14, 2016
    Thank you for this information.is it safe to use with the epm2 or should I just rent one until I get one for myself?

     
  15. SSmith

    SSmith Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Dec 14, 2016
    I'll definitely look at these lens on rent sites. I'm going to look into renting as quickly as possible. Should I just rent a OM-D as well, or just roll with my epm2?

     
  16. rloewy

    rloewy Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 5, 2014
    Ron
    I have an e-pm2 and use it with the Pana 25mm 1.7 and Sigma 60 2.8 - I do not think there are any issues with it - AF is quick and I get reliable results with both. I suspect that the same is true for the other lens as well - but I have no first hand experience with them.

    I do believe however that the e-pm2 is a bit harder to use than other cameras - the lack of controls can make it harder to use when you need to do quick manual changes.

    I use the e-pm2 mostly because it is so small and easy to carry when going hiking etc.. - if I were to work with a camera photographing events - I suspect that other cameras would be easier to live with (not that it is impossible to do, I get really great results with my e-pm2, it is just not the easiest camera to use in some situations).
     
  17. rloewy

    rloewy Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 5, 2014
    Ron
    This really depends on you. I like a scientific approach where I only make one change at a time and measure the results - when you change multiple variables at once it is at times hard to pinpoint what each one brings to the table, but if you plan on doing this professionally anyway - and there is a good chance you will upgrade both the body and camera - no harm in just renting both I suppose.
     
  18. SSmith

    SSmith Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Dec 14, 2016
    I'm worried too because I've never used it for a wedding. I've only used the epl6 so I'm confused on what to do. I'm just gonna rent one of lenses mentioned and if I can rent the OM-D, I'll do that too.
     
  19. SSmith

    SSmith Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Dec 14, 2016
    Hopefully I'll be able to rent both and I can compare them both and see where it leads me....thanks!
     
  20. RichardB

    RichardB Snapshooter

    457
    Nov 19, 2012
    Maryland, US
    Richard
    I use my E-PM2 for snapshots, but for more important photography I far prefer the two control wheels for my right thumb and forefinger on an E-P5 or E-M5. I'm usually in Program mode, but I can quickly change exposure compensation (to correct for back-lighting or dark/light foreground) and the aperture/shutter combination with those two wheels. The larger cameras are also easier to hold steady with large lenses.

    The E-PM2 makes a nice pocket camera with a pancake lens. (I prefer the Oly 17mm/2.8.) There are other lightweight primes, such as the O45/1.8, that aren't pancake-size but still pair well with the E-PM2.

    I don't think the E-PM2 is unable to take wedding photographs. I've gotten beautiful shots with that camera, and it has the technology that was the top of the Olympus line 5 years ago. It just doesn't handle as fast or as comfortably as the bigger bodies with more control points.

    Another suggestion I'd make is to get a flash. The FL-300R works well, or the FL-600R has more range and can swivel. I prefer existing light, but the Oly flashes can give natural-looking fill light and eliminate motion blur.

    Having lots of big gear can be a marketing strategy for pro photographers. Heavy gear does indicate an ability to handle whatever unusual situation might call for exotic hardware, but simple gear can also take excellent photographs. Too many couples these days are postponing marriage because every aspect of a wedding has gotten so expensive, so I'm all for professionals who serve the lower-cost end of the market using tools that are adequate for the job and not just displayed to justify a big bill.