1. Reminder: Please use our affiliate links for holiday shopping!

EPL5: overexposes a bit?

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by WT21, Feb 15, 2013.

  1. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    Anyone else finding their EPL5 tends to overexpose? This is mainly indoors, and I've been mainly shoot the P20 and P25. Thinking of dialing back the EV a bit. Wondering if anyone else is seeing this.
     
  2. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    I find the opposite - mine seems to underexpose somewhat - esp indoors. However, the live histogram makes for really easy compensation.
     
  3. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    I've been doing more experimentation. I've had 2 issues: The first is that I had the brightness set up too high on my EVF. I've adjusted that. But the second is that it's not overexposing as much as it's clipping red too easily. I've been using center weighted and I have some strong reds in my house, so I've noticed it. Been playing around a bit, and it seems that using ESP helps more than center weighted, though ESP seems to underexpose a bit.

    pdk42, what metering option are you using?
     
  4. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    I'm using ESP in the main.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. David A

    David A Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 30, 2011
    Brisbane, Australia
    I rely on the shadows/highlight clipping indication rather than the histogram when judging exposure and you can do a test to work out how that works for your camera.

    Take a series of shots adjusting the exposure compensation a third of a stop each time. Note on which shot the clipping indication starts to show. Open the photos in your photo processing software and check through them without adjusting anything, just looking for where you first start to see a clipping indication. Compare the exposure of that shot to your record of where the camera started to show clipping. Finally, start working on the shots to recover the highlights and find out just where you stop being able to do that. That really indicates what your maximum limit is.

    I tried this experiment with my E-P3 and Aperture last year and discovered that Aperture indicated clipping a little before the camera did, but that I could recover the highlight easily. When I swapped to Lightroom I looked at the same test series in it and discovered that it did not show clipping until one or two thirds of a stop plus exposure compensation past where Aperture had shown it and another series of test shots showed that camera and Lightroom were pretty close to each other in indicating clipping.

    If you're going to use the shadows/highlight indication, you can adjust the level at which it shows clipping. The default setting is 255, right at the maximum level, but you can set it as low as 245 which is where I set it. That means it indicates clipping a little earlier. If the clipping is from a light source or a specular reflection I ignore it but I do watch for clipping in areas where I want detail and adjust my exposure whenever I get clipping indication in one of those areas.
     
  6. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    If you don't know, you can actually set the Oly cam to indicate clipping in blacks or whites, just shy of the max, that way the blinkies come sooner. It's in the gears menu, though I don't have the cam handy to look it up.
     
  7. SS76

    SS76 Mu-43 Regular

    47
    Nov 2, 2013
    I am having the same issue using the 12mm and the 45mm wide open. These photos are with -1 EV, and still are over exposed.

    Unsure what to do, have a look:
    http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3588315

    Any help would be appreciated.
     
  8. fredlong

    fredlong Just this guy...

    Apr 18, 2011
    Massachusetts USA
    Fred
    Indoors under artificial light you have pools of light close to the various light fixtures in the room. The areas away from the the lights are much darker but our brains compensate. Either the dark or light areas can throw off the light meter. It doesn't know what you want. One way to get a good exposure in these conditions is to use spot metering and exposure lock. Read your manual to find out how to set those.

    Put the spot on your subject and lock it. Compose and focus as usual. Fire off a shot and check it. Use the exposure compensation as needed. Don't be afraid to really crank the compensation if you need to. You're not moving away from the right exposure, you're moving toward it. The camera is wrong.

    Expose for your subject, let the light and dark areas fall where they will.

    With some practice you don't need the test shot to estimate the amount of compensation to start with.

    Fred
     
  9. photo_owl

    photo_owl Mu-43 Regular

    164
    Nov 8, 2013
    It's all about matching the metering mode, or subject being metered, with your requirements
     
  10. SS76

    SS76 Mu-43 Regular

    47
    Nov 2, 2013
    Thanks Fred. I will do that. I knew it was likely me doing something wrong, I have a lot to learn!
     
  11. photo_owl

    photo_owl Mu-43 Regular

    164
    Nov 8, 2013
    it's not about right or wrong, it's about understanding what the camera's doing with regard to the settings you use.

    as an example, ESP will change it's operation based on your AF selection (when using FD). This is logical and useful in most situations but if you don't realise it's doing it it's easy to end up with a problem when the user enters further compensation :)

    everyone gets caught out from time to time - I was still remember shooting a large bird but with awkward lighting, so I switched to spot metering just to make sure the subject was kept correctly exposed regardless of the surroundings,,,,,,,,unfortunately I had failed to take into account the speckled nature of the body and the relationship between the size of these speckles and the metering area. I got shots ranging 4 stops in exposure!
     
  12. Photophil

    Photophil Mu-43 Regular

    47
    Nov 24, 2012
    Atlanta Georgia area
    Check the highlight clipping.

    With my ancient Canon 10D and it's narrow dynamic range, I mostly used spot metering in manual mode so that I could place highlight tones where I wanted them. But with the E-PL5, the highlight and shadow clipping indicators are your friend. I rarely even look at the histogram. I set my highlight indicator to show clipping at 250. With this setting, I can get by with some clipping showing in important areas, and still recover detail in LR5. My E-PL5 seems to expose properly when I use A mode. I use M mode most of the time, so the exposure is up to me. Compared to what I went through with the 10D, the highlight/shadow clipping indicator along with the huge dynamic range of the E-PL5, have changed my photographic life.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. SS76

    SS76 Mu-43 Regular

    47
    Nov 2, 2013
    My metering was the issue!!!