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EPL2 exposure

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by goldjim, May 31, 2011.

  1. goldjim

    goldjim Mu-43 Regular

    56
    Apr 22, 2011
    Md.
    Hello,

    I took a few photos using center weighed metering with the ec set at -30/10 and all the photos came out badly under exposed. It was a sunny day and bright sky.

    test shots - GoldJim's Photos
     
  2. jamespetts

    jamespetts Mu-43 Top Veteran

    803
    May 21, 2011
    London, England
    Might I ask - why centre weighted? I don't know why modern cameras still include this mode, as it is obsolete and unreliable. Do your photographs turn out well with evaluative metering?
     
  3. Howi

    Howi Mu-43 Veteran

    208
    Feb 23, 2011
    Sheffield
    Howard
    What do you meen by -30/10??? I read that as - 3 ev, if so, it's hardly surprising they are under exposed. Check your histogram....what is that telling you?
     
  4. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Do the photos look fine on the camera, then when you put them on the computer you discover they're all underexposed? This is the experience I had with the E-PL2. First shoot I took it out on I did 500 singer headshots in an 8 hour shoot... put them on the computer and discovered that every single one was underexposed.

    It didn't take me long to figure out what the problem was. The default Monitor Brightness on the E-PL2 LCD monitor is way too bright. I went into my Disp settings and adjusted the Monitor Brightness value to -5 (I derived at this figure by opening a photo on both computer and camera together, and adjusted until they looked similar), and now the photos on my camera preview look like they will when I open them on my computer.

    The Monitor Brightness is an icon that looks like this:
    m-mon-bright.

    This is similar to the problem I had with the default monitor brightness on the E-3 when I first got that camera. The E-3 had a setting called "Auto", which would adjust monitor brightness according to the ambient light it saw. Totally moronic feature, if you ask me. You never knew what kind of exposure your photos had because the camera was automatically adjusting it to make it "look better". I want the photo to look good, not my preview!! It took me a while before I figured out how to turn this setting off, and I couldn't love the E-3 until I did. At least with the E-PL2 I knew exactly how to fix already.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Evaluative metering averages out the entire frame. If you have a subject and a background in your photos, there is a good chance that they are not at the same light level. For instance, if you have a person standing in front of a bright sunny scene (or how about a white seamless backdrop?), that person will come out dark and shadowed if you account for the sunny background in your metering. If you meter for the subject only, then your subject will come out perfectly exposed while the background (not the important part of the photo!) will be overexposed.

    That's why we use Center Weighted... Or Spot Meter, but spot has the problem of being too precise at times and can get thrown off by one little highlight or shadow. Center weighted is more stable and consistent because it uses a larger subject area, but still puts the control of what you want to meter in your hands as a photographer.

    You may call me antiquated, but us old time photographers like to control how we want the image to come out, not trust the camera to do it for us.
     
  6. OPSSam

    OPSSam Mu-43 Regular

    134
    Dec 18, 2010
    NC
    Aside from adjusting the LCD, I too trust the histogram above all else. I find it's the best method to judge exposure in the field.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. jamespetts

    jamespetts Mu-43 Top Veteran

    803
    May 21, 2011
    London, England
    I don't think that evaluative metering is just whole-frame unweighted average metering, is it? Older cameras (i.e., from the 1980s, like my old Canon T70) didn't have evaluative metering - they just had centre weighted and partial (the latter being a sort of half-hearted spot-meter - the T90 had a proper spot meter). Evaluative metering came along later when metering became more intelligent and did things other than just average out the whole frame, giving prominence to the middle - it is able to evaluate (hence the name) the scene and, using a number of pre-programmed settings for different types of scene, work out the appropriate exposure. On my Canon G10, at least, I have found it exceedingly accurate.

    Back in the days when I used to use 35mm film, I almost always used to use a hand-held selenium cell meter and a grey card to get very accurate exposures; but now that I can see the exposure on the camera's built-in LCD and the histogram, I just use evaluative metering (and very occasionally spot metering) plus exposure compensation where necessary.
     
  8. goldjim

    goldjim Mu-43 Regular

    56
    Apr 22, 2011
    Md.
    Sounds good to me. I will try it.
     
  9. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    iAuto also does the same thing, evaluating the scene and using pre-programmed settings for the different types of scene (scene mode). That doesn't mean that everybody should be using iAuto because it's "more intelligent", and it certainly doesn't make evaluative metering "more accurate" than spot or center weighted. There is still no more accurate metering for your own personal purposes than that which you choose for yourself. I understand your argument as to why you prefer to use evaluative metering, but please don't call it more accurate to allow the camera to choose the settings for you. That's simply a misnomer.
     
  10. jamespetts

    jamespetts Mu-43 Top Veteran

    803
    May 21, 2011
    London, England
    Evaluative metering isn't quite the same as iAuto (or the various general automatic modes on a range of modern cameras), as the latter controls more or less all of the settings, whereas evaluative metering only controls exposure. There is such a thing as correct exposure, although, of course, there can sometimes be several correct exposures for a particular scene depending on what one is trying to achieve, and an exposure that is not technically correct may make for a pleasing result. The point was simply that I find that evaluative metering produces photographs with a correct exposure far more reliably than centre-weighted average metering, and is preferable for that reason. It is always desirable to be able to over-ride the metering in one way or another to achieve the desired result, but that is a different matter to the reliability of the metering itself.
     
  11. goldjim

    goldjim Mu-43 Regular

    56
    Apr 22, 2011
    Md.
    I know that -3 will underexpose. I also know how to read a histogram. I didn't realize that I set the camera to -3. Duh!
     
  12. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    There we go, James. I think where we differ is on our definition of accuracy. I need to control my image, and what I consider "inaccuracies" would be the camera automatically choosing a setting, exposure, focus, etc. which is not in line to my vision or what I'm trying to do with the camera. I don't think we differ on our opinions, just our goals. ;)
     
  13. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    lol. That will certainly do it!