EP2 Red Channel

Christilou

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Feb 25, 2010
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I was wondering if there was a way of turning down the red channel in the EP2 menus somewhere. I find the reds of my flowers completely overpowering. I have saturation set to -1 and colour to natural (3). Somehow, trying to pp in Aperture doesn't work particularly well, even if I de-saturate colour or vibrancy. I seem to remember that you could turn it down in the GH1 but am not sure where to look in the EP2 menus. It is not immediately obvious anyway. Any clues please?
 

Brian Mosley

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Hi Christilou, I don't think you can reduce saturation on an individual colour channel at time of capture... maybe use spot metering on the brightest red? or start with Contrast -2, Saturation -2 and Natural Colour mode in AdobeRGB colour space... maybe even Muted colour mode?

Cheers

Brian
 

DavidB

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Melbourne, Australia
I think the first thing to check is that you're using an appropriate White Balance. Take a picture of a neutral (white/grey) object under the same light as is illuminating the flowers, and use that to set a custom white balance.

If you're shooting RAW then the in-camera settings such as saturation are ignored, and your RAW processor (e.g. Aperture or Lightroom/ACR) can work with the underlying data from scratch. With ACR you can go so far as to generate custom DNG profiles to equalise the colour behaviour of all your cameras, but I'd be surprised if you have to go down that path. Fixing the WB is usually enough.
With RAW files you can manipulate the WB in your RAW processor and immediately see the effects of various settings. You can also do this to JPEG images but you're limited by the processing applied to the JPEG by the camera.
 

Brian Mosley

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Taken this morning, example shot of brilliant red flowers in direct sunlight... using spot metering.

E-P2 + ZD 50mm f2 macro
1/2000s f/3.5 at 50.0mm iso200
View attachment 143846
 

Brian Mosley

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I think that, if you can retain the highlights where they are on this last one, but reduce the shadows to improve the contrast - you'll be there!

You haven't blown the highlights - I can still see all the detail in the reds in your last shot :2thumbs:

Cheers

Brian
 

Christilou

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Camberley, Surrey
RAW

I think the first thing to check is that you're using an appropriate White Balance. Take a picture of a neutral (white/grey) object under the same light as is illuminating the flowers, and use that to set a custom white balance.

If you're shooting RAW then the in-camera settings such as saturation are ignored, and your RAW processor (e.g. Aperture or Lightroom/ACR) can work with the underlying data from scratch. With ACR you can go so far as to generate custom DNG profiles to equalise the colour behaviour of all your cameras, but I'd be surprised if you have to go down that path. Fixing the WB is usually enough.
With RAW files you can manipulate the WB in your RAW processor and immediately see the effects of various settings. You can also do this to JPEG images but you're limited by the processing applied to the JPEG by the camera.
I'm just really lazy, I try not to shoot RAW with the EP2, that is why I chose it! I have not often used the one touch white balance, I should probably try to become more familiar with it really :smile: Thanks for your suggestions though, taken onboard.
 

DavidB

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You have blown the highlights, even in that last one (just not as much). The red channel in your result will have hit 255: no more detail.

If I was feeding these overexposed shots through Lightroom/ACR, I'd first be backing off the Exposure slider to compensate, then doublechecking the white balance.

As an example, a common mistake with photographing red roses on green foliage is to trust the camera's meter. It's easy to end up with blown out reds with no texture, and it's commonly referred to as saturation clipping (distinct from highlight or shadow clipping).

Check your histograms in-camera (especially the separate R/G/B histograms!).
 

Brian Mosley

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David, you're right - if you look for it, you can see small areas in mine and in Christi's last shot which are saturated.

It's tricky - and the histogram is derived from the jpeg so not always perfectly accurate either.

I suppose we should underexpose, to be safe?

Cheers

Brian
 

DavidB

Mu-43 Regular
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Apr 7, 2010
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Location
Melbourne, Australia
Red flowers always seem to be the worst example in this regard.

I wouldn't blindly recommend "underexposing" per se, as that can have flow-on impacts on image quality (e.g. noise/quantisation).
The bottom line is that you should always be aware of your histograms, and if you shoot in RAW you'll have a slight "safety buffer" built in. If you're shooting in JPEG you should get your white balance as close to the final result as possible in-camera, as any clipping will happen after that (as an extreme example the wrong white balance might cause the reds to be exaggerated and thus clip earlier than they would otherwise).
These are some of the many reasons I stopped shooting in JPEG years ago (2003 if I recall correctly).

BTW, none of this is specific to the E-P2!
 
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