EM5 MK11 Beginner Questions

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by DannyG, Apr 26, 2016.

  1. DannyG

    DannyG Mu-43 Rookie

    18
    Apr 4, 2016
    Tasmania, Australia
    I am new to photography. Well not new, I have been taking photos for years but I am only just starting to learn how to take better photographs.
    So I want to start my own thread where I can ask some silly questions! They are going to be very beginner questions so I apologise if some of them may come across ridiculous.

    We took our EM5 MK11 with a 14-150 lens out for the first time last weekend and we are learning a lot but already there are a few little things we haven't been able to find the answers to.

    My first question for the thread is what is the difference between using a scene mode, in this case 'sunset' and just using manual settings in regards to the colours.
    Obviously the photos that are coming out of scene mode are really red looking.
    Is that because the camera is processing them with more of a red hue or is it because it is doing something that I could be doing myself by using different settings? Perhaps I can do it by changing the white balance or something?
    Thanks for any help and again I apologise for making thread that one day I can look back on a laugh at my very newbie questions!

    Two samples of a shot that is using scene mode 'sunset' and one that is just using aperture mode. The scene mode is way over saturated with red on this one but at times it does work so i want to be able to adjust this 'look' myself.

    P4240226-2. P4240226.
     
  2. DannyG

    DannyG Mu-43 Rookie

    18
    Apr 4, 2016
    Tasmania, Australia
    Question two!

    We know we cant take macro shots with our 14-150mm but we are happy to take 'close ups' in most cases. However until we buy a dedicated lens that it is suited to macro shots what would be the best bang for buck adaptor to use with our 14-150mm to get better close ups??

    Would either of these suit and if so which one would be better??
    Meike Auto Focus Automatic Macro Extension Tube 10,16mm Olympus Micro 4/3 Camera
    RAYNOX DCR-250 Super Macro Conversion CLOSE-UP LENS 52mm 55mm 58mm 67mm map

    Here are a couple of 'close ups' we took on our first outing. We like them, we understand that perhaps our focusing and composition could be better and of course they are just hand held but we really like macro so until we can afford a proper lens we want to improve on what we have.

    P4230014. P4230031.
     
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  3. DannyG

    DannyG Mu-43 Rookie

    18
    Apr 4, 2016
    Tasmania, Australia
    Question 3.

    I know this one will be subjective to opinion but here are two photos simply taken in the P mode (I am far from ready to use Manual mode yet), hand held on a beautiful morning. I was limited to where I could stand and take them (I'm on a tiny jetty surrounded by tree's) but I would like feedback on what would have a real photographer done to make these shots better?? Please go your hardest as I am wanting hard criticism to help me improve.

    Both taken with the 14-150mm.

    ISO 200 90mm f/11 1/800
    P4240234.

    ISO 200 14mm f/22 1/100
    P4240228.
     
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  4. MaK543

    MaK543 Mu-43 Regular

    139
    May 1, 2012
    MD USA
    For budget macro, close up lenses are easy to use, but extension tubes could provide better result within their limitations. Canon's 500D close up lenses have pretty good track records, but pricey.
     
  5. JDK504

    JDK504 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    527
    Jun 28, 2013
    image. I shoot in the flatest profile possible in A mode mostly and Manual. I haven't updated to the new firmware (I'm still operating at the original fw).
    I use natural and set everything to negative. Then in post I have more control. Also shoot in RAW or RAW + JPEG for better control in post.

    If you are shooting in bright lights or the sun, etc trying shooting in silent mode so your shutter can go up to 1/16000 vs the 1/8000. It will make a huge difference.

    Here is a shot of my daughter at the beach taken with my EM5 II and Pany 15. Just a quick test (silent mode 1/16000, A mode, lens wide open at 1.7).
     
  6. flamingfish

    flamingfish Mu-43 Top Veteran

    771
    Nov 16, 2012
    Emily
    Welcome, and as someone who was in your shoes not long ago, I have to say that I love seeing someone else here who is just making the jump from point-and-shoot to M43.

    In scene mode, the camera is choosing the settings based on Olympus' idea of which settings are best for particular situations. You might choose the same settings if you were shooting in A, S, or M, but you might not. The scene modes may give good results, usually, but they're based on generalities, not the particular landscape or snow scene or fast-action sports event in front of you. With practice, you'll begin to develop an eye for what settings you think are right for a particular scene for the result that you want, which might not be the result that the presets are aimed at.

    With regard to the overly-red tone, I'm only speculating, but I think the camera may be applying some changes that the user can do only in post-processing, not in camera. You certainly can achieve that very red look in post-processing, and many wilder and weirder effects if you choose. It doesn't look like a change in white balance to me. However, try a couple of things. I'm not sure they'll duplicate that look (in fact, I suspect they won't), but you'll learn from them. Take a pic in P, A, S, or M mode using the default white balance. Then take the exact same pic with each of the white balance options that the camera gives you. Next, menu dive until you find the Oly "picture mode" settings (i-enhance, vivid, natural, portrait, monotone -- or at least that's what the e-M5 mark I has). Repeat the exercise with each of these settings and see what happens. I-enhance is most likely to get you closest to what the scene setting does -- it increases the color saturation.

    Really, to get the level of control I think you're talking about, you'll need to learn to use a post-processing program like Lightroom. Shooting raw will give you the most flexibility, but there are things that can be done with jpegs even though the camera has already applied some processing to them.

    By the way, if you click through the options when you're looking at your photo in the camera, you'll find a screen that shows you what the camera settings were. I'm not completely sure that it gives you the settings when you've used a scene mode, but I don't see why it wouldn't.
     
  7. flamingfish

    flamingfish Mu-43 Top Veteran

    771
    Nov 16, 2012
    Emily
    For budget macro, one option is a converter and a "legacy" lens (which, if I understand the term correctly, means a lens made for a camera that is no longer current technology, such as a film camera). I bought a Canon legacy lens (sorry, I'm blanking on which one) on eBay for about $50 US, and a converter (or do I mean adapter?) ring for maybe $30 US. I found lens recommendations by searching the forums here. You would lose autofocus, so you'd have to focus manually, but that's a good skill to have, particularly for macro. I recommend practicing on subjects that aren't going to fly away -- or, since I see you're in Australia, attack and try to kill you. :)

    General advice for the forum: you're more likely to get responses to your questions if you start an individual thread for each, with a title that indicates what you're asking about. Much of what you want to know might already have been discussed, so it's good to do some searching before you post a new thread. Don't take this advice the wrong way -- this is possibly the most polite and friendly forum I've been on.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2016
  8. Bassam Guy

    Bassam Guy Mu-43 Rookie

    11
    Aug 26, 2015
    I don't use scene modes in camera but I believe the Keep Warm Color setting will still be in effect. Menu -> Custom G -> Keep Warm Color.
    You know, with Olympus Viewer 3 you can play around with scene and art modes in the comfort of home.
     
  9. Bassam Guy

    Bassam Guy Mu-43 Rookie

    11
    Aug 26, 2015
    I have seen some great stuff using extension tubes, and less with closeup lenses. You have the focal range with the 14-150, just get a tube.
    When/if you do get a "real" macro lens, get the 60. All other native u43 lenses are too wide. I like to keep as much distance as I can from macro subjects.
     
  10. Bassam Guy

    Bassam Guy Mu-43 Rookie

    11
    Aug 26, 2015
    I can see you have a good eye. You are ready for Manual, you are just afraid! My first camera - not my choice but my mother's friend's - was a fully manual OM-1. I would've preferred P, A, or S for sure but I had no choice. At first, I just kept the needle between the guides and kept the shutter no faster than 1/60.
     
  11. DannyG

    DannyG Mu-43 Rookie

    18
    Apr 4, 2016
    Tasmania, Australia
    Thanks very much for the In depth replies.
    I'll grab the tubes and see what sort of results I get.
    I'll also start to slowly play around with manual mode more as I learn. I just need to find the time and subjects to practice on now :)
     
  12. ivoire

    ivoire Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2011
    Naperville, IL
    mike
    Go to Menu -> Custom G -> Keep Warm Color and turn it off. That should help with the overly "red" color
     
  13. 50orsohours

    50orsohours Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 13, 2013
    Portland Oregon
    Indeed you have a good eye. So turn off that "keep warm colors". As far as using manual or aperture mode, it is easy since we are using a Mirrorles camera. You see what the sensor sees. No surprises