em5 iii tripod thread breaking?

ac12

Mu-43 Hall of Famer
Joined
Apr 24, 2018
Messages
2,935
Location
SF Bay Area, California, USA
This discussion makes me wonder about the inside of the EM5-mk3.
Is there a metal frame that the tripod socket could have been attached to? Maybe not.
On my old SLR the base plate was simply a piece of stamped sheet metal, which went over the tripod socket. The tripod socket was attached to an inner frame, not the baseplate, which would have flexed under load.

It also bothered me that the tripod socket was not in the middle of the base plate, where there would be more even loading onto the base plate.
 

comment23

mu-43 frequent flyer
Joined
Aug 26, 2016
Messages
1,717
Location
Hampshire, UK
Real Name
Simon
This discussion makes me wonder about the inside of the EM5-mk3.
Is there a metal frame that the tripod socket could have been attached to? Maybe not.
On my old SLR the base plate was simply a piece of stamped sheet metal, which went over the tripod socket. The tripod socket was attached to an inner frame, not the baseplate, which would have flexed under load.

It also bothered me that the tripod socket was not in the middle of the base plate, where there would be more even loading onto the base plate.
Pictures of failed mounts over on DPR suggest that the tripod socket is not attached to an inner frame and relies entirely on the polycarbonate base for fixing to the rest of the camera. 🤦‍♂️

I’d very much like the E-M5.3 but I rely on the PD Capture quite a lot (need to be able to have my hands free to keep the young ‘uns under control) so it’s a bit of a deal breaker for me.
 

RAH

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Dec 1, 2013
Messages
1,266
Location
New Hampshire
Real Name
Rich
Nope. Aristophanes said that putting a grip on an EM5 III makes it so similar to an EM1 that one might as well get the EM1. I said I can always take the L-bracket/grip off the 5.3 and it becomes a light, compact camera again. Can't do the same with an EM1. I have the 5.3 and the 1.3 and I value the difference. :)

A 1.3 with an L-bracket on it is bigger yet, albeit not as big as an EM1X.
Oops, you're right. Sorry, I mis-read what you said. Yes, I agree - the E-M5.3 without an added grip is very much like a weather-sealed E-M10 (on steroids - hi-res mode, etc). :)
 

RichardC

Mu-43 Hall of Famer
Joined
Mar 25, 2018
Messages
3,127
Location
The Royal Town of Sutton Coldfield, UK.
Real Name
Richard
This discussion makes me wonder about the inside of the EM5-mk3.
Is there a metal frame that the tripod socket could have been attached to? Maybe not.
On my old SLR the base plate was simply a piece of stamped sheet metal, which went over the tripod socket. The tripod socket was attached to an inner frame, not the baseplate, which would have flexed under load.

It also bothered me that the tripod socket was not in the middle of the base plate, where there would be more even loading onto the base plate.
Maybe their market research indicated that EM5.3 owners wouldn't buy tripods?

If they are not going to attach the tripod socket to a load bearing part of the camera chassis - they would be better off not having one at all.

Bonkers.
 

stevedo

Mu-43 Veteran
Joined
May 12, 2012
Messages
494
Location
UK
Real Name
Steve Douglas
Maybe their market research indicated that EM5.3 owners wouldn't buy tripods?

If they are not going to attach the tripod socket to a load bearing part of the camera chassis - they would be better off not having one at all.

Bonkers.
Then why include things like tripod Hi-res mode and longer shutter speeds?

I just get the feeling that they screwed up.
 

RAH

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Dec 1, 2013
Messages
1,266
Location
New Hampshire
Real Name
Rich
I think they made a mistake and should have provided a better way of load bearing on that socket. However, I think it very likely that if you used it for "normal" tripod mounting (as opposed to swinging it around on the end of a strap), you would never have a problem with it, even with somewhat large lenses on the camera. Only time will tell, I suppose...
 

MichailK

Mu-43 Top Veteran
Joined
Nov 6, 2017
Messages
885
Location
Thessaly, Greece
It seems to me that in the design phase they cut corners they should had just ought to leave them on as they always did before - another “duh!” point for a 2020 advanced camera is the lack of ”webcamability” so the Mark III can be used as a webcam while the older Mark II supports this feature with their latest "OM‑D Webcam” software. It is a collection of such small “duh” points that makes the M5iii looking less and less yummy for me - and if I shoot for an M1ii instead I then have to abandon the nice contrasty oled evf... duh!
 

comment23

mu-43 frequent flyer
Joined
Aug 26, 2016
Messages
1,717
Location
Hampshire, UK
Real Name
Simon
...as opposed to swinging it around on the end of a strap...
Thing is that’s not how the PD Capture works. It secures the camera to your shoulder or belt so although I’ll agree it’s not a traditional loading, it’s hardly carelessly swinging it about, like the straps sold by olympus that mount here do.
 
Last edited:

Holoholo55

Mu-43 Hall of Famer
Joined
Aug 13, 2014
Messages
3,588
Location
Honolulu, HI
Real Name
Walter
. I
I think they made a mistake and should have provided a better way of load bearing on that socket. However, I think it very likely that if you used it for "normal" tripod mounting (as opposed to swinging it around on the end of a strap), you would never have a problem with it, even with somewhat large lenses on the camera. Only time will tell, I suppose...
IIRC, the stories on DPreview of the tripod sockets cracking had to do with using PD plates on the camera and carrying them in the Capture Clip or attached to a tripod. There was some flex of the baseplate at the tripod socket, and in some cases, the baseplate cracked around the socket. I also got the impression that the users were using larger lenses on the cameras, which would have put more stress on the sockets. That's why I think an effective mitigation of this potential issue would be to use a good-fitting L-bracket to spread the stress out. Anyway, that's what I'm hoping. :)
 

Mack

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Jan 14, 2018
Messages
1,371
Related to plastic cracking.

Discovered yesterday my old Quantum flash has a broken plastic case from just sitting in its bag (I think the flash's reflector lock stresses the plastic housing just sitting around.). I was thinking of replacing it with a Godox AD-360-II Nikon unit hoping I might be also use the Godox Olympus radio transmitters with it too. Quantum never was a reliable unit given it cost me maybe $1,500 back then along with their finicky Copilot transmitter. Lots of misfires and their QTTL/TTL was also hit/and mostly miss.

On the Godox website I saw the following warning:
Fine print on Godox AD-360-II Nikon TTL flash on the Godox website http://www.godox.com/EN/Products_Camera_Flash_Witstro_AD360IIN_Powerfou&Portable_Flash.html :

"Note: As AD-360-II N is a little heavy, it is not recommended to mount AD-360II-N on the camera for the camera hotshoe might be damaged."

Same is mentioned for the Canon AD-360-II C model too. http://www.godox.com/EN/Products_Camera_Flash_Witstro_AD360IIC_Powerfou&Portable_Flash.html

When I worked retail with these things, Canon went to plastic tops (AE-1) and Minolta followed shortly. Wasn't uncommon to see the hotshoes broken off the plastic tops of the cameras back then. The cheaper plastic bodies suffered while the "Pro" metal lines held up better, but even then some metal ones showed up bent but at least not cracked apart.

Aside, and maybe what will become of the Olympus>JIP takeover, PromarkBrands took over Quantum when they fired all employees in 2012-2013. Seems PromarkBrands is just a holding tank of parts and unsold units for Quantum now with some repairs which are very expensive. They also took down the ability to make user firmware updates so you have to send stuff to them and pay for any firmware updates. PromarkBrands had an online forum for a few years where retired/laid off Quantum employees would assist users, but that too is gone. Shades of things to come with Olympus/JIP maybe.
 
Last edited:

Dogbert62

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Sep 24, 2014
Messages
63
Location
Austin, TX
Real Name
Patrick
Pictures of failed mounts over on DPR suggest that the tripod socket is not attached to an inner frame and relies entirely on the polycarbonate base for fixing to the rest of the camera. 🤦‍♂️
I removed the baseplate and found that the tripod socket is attached internally. To dig in further would have required removing many more parts. I was not willing to go there....

Regards
Dogbert62
 

comment23

mu-43 frequent flyer
Joined
Aug 26, 2016
Messages
1,717
Location
Hampshire, UK
Real Name
Simon
I removed the baseplate and found that the tripod socket is attached internally. To dig in further would have required removing many more parts. I was not willing to go there....

Regards
Dogbert62
That’s really interesting and good to know. Did you happen to take any photos of this?
 

Dogbert62

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Sep 24, 2014
Messages
63
Location
Austin, TX
Real Name
Patrick
That’s really interesting and good to know. Did you happen to take any photos of this?
I planned on taking photos of the 5.3 and 10.2 to show differences.. But the “other” forum got nasty so I punted..
However, there was a photo on the “other” forum where a friend of the poster took the baseplate off as well showing what I saw..

so... once the baseplate is removed, there is another plastic moulded piece that is on top of the socket screw... without getting behind this, I couldn’t tell how the socket screw was attached to the sub-frame.. I couldn’t tell what the sub-frame was made of either... I assumed I needed to remove the screen and back plate to investigate further.. again more than I bargained for...

My educated guess is that the silicone inserts and the cutouts on the PD plate are exacerbating the issue.. but... not the whole issue.. the area Immediately surrounding the socket screw is proud of the baseplate by ~0.5mm while the socket screw in recessed.. I also noticed much more play with a 5.3/60mm vs a 10.2/60mm

So... my conclusion..
I will use the 5.3 with flat plate without silicone inserts (Acratech) with small/light lenses up to and including the 60 mm. I will not use it with larger/heavier lenses like the 12-40mm and 75-300mm. I also will not carry the tripod with the camera attached..
Regards
Dogbert62
 

Holoholo55

Mu-43 Hall of Famer
Joined
Aug 13, 2014
Messages
3,588
Location
Honolulu, HI
Real Name
Walter
I planned on taking photos of the 5.3 and 10.2 to show differences.. But the “other” forum got nasty so I punted..
However, there was a photo on the “other” forum where a friend of the poster took the baseplate off as well showing what I saw..

so... once the baseplate is removed, there is another plastic moulded piece that is on top of the socket screw... without getting behind this, I couldn’t tell how the socket screw was attached to the sub-frame.. I couldn’t tell what the sub-frame was made of either... I assumed I needed to remove the screen and back plate to investigate further.. again more than I bargained for...

My educated guess is that the silicone inserts and the cutouts on the PD plate are exacerbating the issue.. but... not the whole issue.. the area Immediately surrounding the socket screw is proud of the baseplate by ~0.5mm while the socket screw in recessed.. I also noticed much more play with a 5.3/60mm vs a 10.2/60mm

So... my conclusion..
I will use the 5.3 with flat plate without silicone inserts (Acratech) with small/light lenses up to and including the 60 mm. I will not use it with larger/heavier lenses like the 12-40mm and 75-300mm. I also will not carry the tripod with the camera attached..
Regards
Dogbert62
Would you mind giving us the link to that photo? Just the photo. I was searching through the forums on that site trying to find it, and reached my threshold for painful threads. I saw one photo of the baseplate itself, but not of the mounting of the tripod socket.

Thanks
 

Dogbert62

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Sep 24, 2014
Messages
63
Location
Austin, TX
Real Name
Patrick
The link below provides the information you are looking for... When I first saw the photos, I though the black piece covering most of the tripod screw was removable. It is not.... it is an integral part of the entire black section
https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64306542

Hopefully this doesn't break forum rules to post a link.. For the record, I do not have an account on the "other" forum anymore... It is way too caustic for me...

Regards
Dogbert
 
Last edited:

Sam0912

Mu-43 Veteran
Joined
Mar 1, 2012
Messages
307
Location
Manchester UK
Real Name
Sam Roberts
The link below provides the information you are looking for... When I first saw the photos, I though the black piece covering most of the tripod screw was removable. It is not.... it is an integral part of the entire black section
https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64306542

Hopefully this doesn't break forum rules to post a link.. For the record, I do not have an account on the "other" forum anymore... It is way too caustic for me...

Regards
Dogbert
As someone who’s worked in engineering for over 20 years, I found that fascinating. I think he hits the nail on the head at the end (no pun intended) unfortunately, there are indeed modern plastics that are lighter than metal, but as strong. But if Olympus had used those, it would’ve cost more than using metal. Unfortunately this is cost cutting and I don’t agree with having to restrict how you use the canera because of this - if you use PD straps or whatever the camera should be able to take it. My mk1 is like a little tank, it’s still my “beach camera” with the 12-50 kit lens, as I can just rinse the sand and salt water off and not worry. It’s been abused for some time and eye cup excluded, has never failed. And adding grips etc for using big lenses is optional, I can stick my 20mm 1.7 on and have a great little walk around, I can’t shrink an EM1.

I’ve just tried out an XT3 and 16-80 on a week holiday in Pembrokeshire, it’s a fantastic camera but I found it a heavy combo on the hikes compared to say an EM5 and 12-35, with the added m43 bonus of slapping the 20 on for indoors etc. So I thought I’d have a look at the mkiii as the lighter weight plastic construction sort of appealed, as long as the toughness was still there.

I’m at a crossroads at the moment, was considering going “bigger” as I find my iphone doing more of the day to day stuff anyway, and planning on buying a camper van and doing a lot more hiking/wild swimming, so the camera would be for specific occasions...I’m hardly a pro though so not sure I can be bothered lugging the fuji and a zoom lens around, might have to look at the EM5 mkii deals, as I’ve said before elsewhere I consider the EM5 the ultimate m43 camera, small, light, TOUGH, and fully featured. It’s small with the 1.7/1.8 primes, and can be adapted to handle big lenses when needed. Unfortunately it looks like they just couldn’t justify the cost of keeping that lovely metal body. From a costs point of view surely just putting the em1 sensor in the mkii body would’ve saved on R+D etc. And have meant mkii owners could’ve kept their batteries/adapters etc. But then they’d have been criticised for a lack of innovation I suppose
 

RichardC

Mu-43 Hall of Famer
Joined
Mar 25, 2018
Messages
3,127
Location
The Royal Town of Sutton Coldfield, UK.
Real Name
Richard
This doesn't help the OP, and wasn't necessarily the cause, but it might help someone else.

Over the years, I've seen a number of mishaps caused by mounting on a tripod.

I always mount a battery grip, flash grip or l-bracket on the camera because I'd rather mess up a grip than a camera.

Heavy lenses come with a whacking great big metal tripod collar for a reason - leave them on the lens and use them.

Don't over tighten slotted screw fixings - finger tight and 1/4 turn is plenty if the padding on your intended attachment is in good condition. If it isn't, change the padding.
 
Last edited:

doady

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
106
Location
Canada
Tripod mount breaking and plastic body was one the things that held me back from E-M5 III. C-7070WZ is all metal except for the doors, buttons and LCD, and of course the plastic of the LCD broke. Of course, there are other things like the plastic trays or covers of CDs, the plastic hook for looping the cord of a vacuum cleaner, the plastic hinges of the handrest of my keyboard, they all break. Plastic doesn't last very long. I will be very careful with the plastic LCD of my E-M1 II.

But maybe I should be careful with the metal of my E-M1 II as well. Being my first ILC, I have wondered if it is proper to store the camera face down in the bag, resting on 12-100mm. I've thought maybe I am doing a bad thing and I should shop for a new bag, or should turn the bag over so that the camera is upright when it is in the closet, but after reading RichardC's post maybe it is okay? I will take care when using tripod. Thankfully, I hardly use it anymore thanks to Sync IS which is part of what drew me to the system in the first place.
 

RichardC

Mu-43 Hall of Famer
Joined
Mar 25, 2018
Messages
3,127
Location
The Royal Town of Sutton Coldfield, UK.
Real Name
Richard
It's more habit with me rather than worrying about breaking my camera.

In photo retail I had to value secondhand equipment for part exchange. The camera baseplate gave up a lot of secrets. Baseplates made by the big five were usually made of metal.

A nice clean baseplate on a nice clean camera suggested the owner bought an ever-ready case on day 1 and more often than not, got his/her pride and joy out for holidays and Christmas day.

A pristine baseplate on a camera with brassed edges was a good indicator that the camera had lived on a motordrive and was worth a more thorough than normal check.

Dents and scratches around the tripod socket were an indication of a careless owner. Bulging tripod sockets were an indication that the owner didn't know his (it was usually a bloke) own strength, or didn't know why his super-tele lens came with its own bracket.

In any event, camera bodies with dented, scratched, uneven or excessive baseplate wear were generally much harder to sell and we avoided buying them. The experience made me over-cautious with my gear and I'm generally very careful with it. Despite weather sealing and freeze proofing, cameras are still delicate things with a great many moving parts. I have few breakages and usually achieve a great price when selling or part exchanging.

@doady - good all-round padding will protect your gear, don't forget the base and lid. Don't over-stuff your bag. Lenses especially can have a lot of mass - but as long as you prevent them from moving around and contacting each other, a bag is good protection. Just don't get sand in it.
 

Latest posts

Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Mu-43 is a fan site and not associated with Olympus, Panasonic, or other manufacturers mentioned on this site.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Copyright © 2009-2019 Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom