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Em5 II vs EM10 II?

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by guzziknight, Nov 8, 2018.

  1. guzziknight

    guzziknight Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    372
    May 18, 2011
    Im currently shooting with an EM10, which I love. I want to get a second camera body.

    From what I’ve seen, IQ wise, both the Em5 II and the Em10 II use the same sensor, thus no real difference in IQ between them.

    Aside from weather sealing, which I don’t really need, and the fully articulating screen, which I would love, is there anything else that would justify the more than $200 price difference in a used one?

    Thanks
     
  2. Will Focus

    Will Focus Mu-43 All-Pro

    I've never shot the em5ii but I'm told it has slightly better IBIS, not that the em10ii is anything to sneeze at. Apart from the weather sealing and possibly in-camera focus stacking (?) I'm not sure how may other substantive benefits there are to the 5.
    I do know the em10ii is a bit lighter and has a built in flash which the em5ii does not. Of course both cameras have a hot shoe but it's kind of nice to have the fill flash option at the ready if flash is a factor to you.
     
  3. What glass are you using? I started with the em5.2 and was quite happy with it... but as soon as I started adding some of the pro lens (see below) I immediately picked up the additional grip.

    If you are intent of using any larger lens then you might find the em10 too small. My daughter has it and it’s a great camera for her, and a huge step up from her iPhone, she won’t be adding any pro glass any time soon. I also picked up a used em1.2 and it comes with a similar grip built in so all my glass feels good with it too.

    The em5.2 is a little larger but definitely feels more solid to me. However the em10.3 or .2 would be more portable if that’s what you’re looking for. There is a difference in dials, function buttons etc but that may or may not be a concern for you. Both would be good options.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Christop82

    Christop82 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    958
    Sep 10, 2016
    I would add a em1 mark 1 to your list. If you don’t mind the slightly larger body, it's the fastest AF body of the three.
     
  5. guzziknight

    guzziknight Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    372
    May 18, 2011
    Thanks. IBIS isn’t a big factor to me, neither is the flash. 90-95% of what I shoot is long exposure on a tripod.
     
  6. guzziknight

    guzziknight Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    372
    May 18, 2011
    Most of what I shoot is on a tripod, wide angle. Longest lens I currently have is my 40-150. No pro grade lenses yet. I have a grip on my EM10, so I’d probably put one on either camera I buy.
     
  7. guzziknight

    guzziknight Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    372
    May 18, 2011
    I don’t think the EM1 has Live Composite, does it? I rarely shoot handheld, or action, so AF speed isn’t a big deal. The times I’ve shot action, the em10 worked fine.
     
  8. TassieFig

    TassieFig Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    690
    Oct 28, 2013
    Tasmania, Australia
    If I didn't need weather sealing (which I do), I'd go for a EM10ii. But then I *don't* like the swivel screen and haven't used/needed HiRes or stacking nearly enough as I thought I would.
     
  9. guzziknight

    guzziknight Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    372
    May 18, 2011
    The screen is really the big draw for me. Just not sure I need it that badly.
     
  10. comment23

    comment23 Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    594
    Aug 26, 2016
    Hampshire, UK
    Simon
    Sounds like it’s a critical feature for you so I just wanted to point out that the E-M1.1 does have Live Composite.
     
  11. guzziknight

    guzziknight Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    372
    May 18, 2011
    I use it quite a bit, so it’s important to me. Good to know the em1 has it.

    I guess the final determination will be which is the most cost effective.
     
  12. Michael Meissner

    Michael Meissner Mu-43 Regular

    Lets see. Off the top of my head:
    • The E-m5 mark II has an external microphone port if you shoot video. And if you add the battery grip, the battery grip has a headphone monitor port to monitor the sound as it is being recorded. I believe the E-m5 mark II also has more video modes than the E-m10 mark II.
    • The E-m5 mark II supports an extra cost battery grip (HLD-8) that allows you double your runtime before you need to change batteries. If you have your camera mounted on a tripod, it can be easier to change the battery in the battery grip without removing the camera from the tripod. If you use the grip, you can select whether the camera uses the grip battery first and then the body battery -- I use this on other cameras when shooting video to change the grip battery in between takes without having to worry about the battery going flat. The battery grip also has two additional buttons, and it has a second shutter and dials for shooting portrait orientation (I find I kept changing things by accident when I'm carrying the camera on my shoulder strap, so I just disable it when I'm using the battery grip on my cameras).
    • Note, the E-m5 mark II uses a different battery (BLN-1 vs. BLS-50) from the E-m10 mark II.
    • The E-m5 mark II has a fully articulating rear screen while the E-m10 mark II has a tilting screen. I find at times I want an articulating screen and at times I want a tilting screen.
    • The E-m5 mark II uses a TFT LCD for the electronic viewfinder while the E-m10 mark II uses an OLED screen. I need to wear polarized sunglasses (due to migraines) when I'm outdoors in sun, and the cameras with the TFT LCD screens (E-m1 mark I/II, E-m5 mark I/II) are problematical to see with polarized sunglasses when shooting in landscape orientation. Now, I think it depends on your glasses and the camera, but unlike the E-m1 mark I/II and E-m5 mark I, I've found that the E-m5 mark II's EVF is completely opaque (the others have wide swatches where you can't see, but I can typically see enough to frame the shot on the E-m1 mark I and E-m5 mark I). In fact, I bought a refurbished E-m10 mark II just because I wanted a camera with a viewfinder I could use in bright sunny weather.
    • IMHO, the OLED EVF tends to over saturate the image a bit, so you have to mentally tone down the image, or in post processing, you may need to ramp up the color tone to get the image you saw when shooting.
    • In the past, OLED monitors tended to start losing their colors as the monitor ages (particularly the blue pixels which go first). I don't know whether it is an issue for camera users who aren't using their cameras day in/day out like LCD monitors and TV users do.
    • The E-m5 mark II has a mode where it makes a combined image by moving the sensor slightly with much more resolution (assuming the camera is on a tripod and shooting a still image).
    • The E-m5 mark II can use the Olympus tethering software.
    • A firmware update to the E-m5 mark II gave it the ability to save and restore the camera settings using Olympus Viewer.
    • The E-m5 mark II is splash proof, assuming you use splash proof lenses. I've shot with my E-m5 mark I, E-m1 mark I, and G85 in torrential rain, as well as the boat ride at Niagara Falls.
    • The E-m10 mark II has a built-in pop-up flash, while the E-m5 mark II has an add-on flash. Note, this add-on flash will only be able to be used on the newest cameras (it has a new contact pin that the older cameras did not have). While the flash is not powerful, it can be rotated to do a ceiling bounce.
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  13. comment23

    comment23 Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    594
    Aug 26, 2016
    Hampshire, UK
    Simon
    A feature the E-M5.2 has that the E-M1.1 and E-M10.2 do not is high resolution (sensor shift). Just in case there is any misunderstanding.
     
  14. TassieFig

    TassieFig Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    690
    Oct 28, 2013
    Tasmania, Australia
    Unless you shoot *lots* of verticals or very low, weird angles, swivel is a pain imo. Many other users love it but it is one of those divisive feature that will never be settled. Only you can say if it will work for you. If $200 hurts a lot, I'd say don't bother. If it doesn't hurt, go for it and try it out for yourself.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  15. guzziknight

    guzziknight Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    372
    May 18, 2011
    Lots of great info here. Thanks!!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. guzziknight

    guzziknight Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    372
    May 18, 2011
    No misunderstanding here. Looks like a good feature, but one I probably won’t use.
     
  17. guzziknight

    guzziknight Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    372
    May 18, 2011
    My first Olympus was an E-600, which had a fully articulating screen. I used it a lot. I’ve always missed having it, I’m just trying to decide if it’s worth the extra money just for that.

    If the em5 II had several other features I really wanted, that could justify the extra cost. As of now, from the info I’ve gathered, I’ll probably get the em10 II.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  18. StephenB

    StephenB Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    339
    Aug 29, 2018
    Somerset UK
    Steve
    I've just started to use the EM5II, having previously only had the EM10II. The 5 has a sturdier and more expensive (which it is) feel to it, having gone from Canon mag alloy bodies the 5 does have a more pro feel to the slightly larger body than the excellent EM10II has. I'm not so keen on the articulating screen for use, but it is good for revolving the screen to a safe position to protect the screen from possible transit damage. Articulating screens work well for low down macro stuff, which is sometimes handy.

    The HDR button on the EM5II is an interesting feature and works surprisingly well hand held, as you're a landscape lover, it may be an interesting button to use after you've fired off your intended compositions. I'm a card whipper-outer, and having the card access on the side means my tripod mount doesn't have to be removed every time I want to chimp the card on the PC, if I'm working on a tripod at home.

    Both are great cameras.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2018
    • Like Like x 1
  19. mauve

    mauve Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 9, 2010
    Paris, France
    Had both at a point. Can't fault either one. I'd say the 10.II was more suited to casual, spur of the moment photography. The 5.II is more tailored to planed, thought out shooting. The 10.II is a street photography dream machine, the 5.II feels better in nature. Also, if you indulge in a bit of video, the 5.II is the better choice.
    All in all, it's a tie. But if you intend to keep your original 10 as a backup, from a logistical point of view, sharing batteries between camera gives an edge to the 10.II in your scenario.

    Cheers,
    M.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  20. MarcioK

    MarcioK New to Mu-43

    3
    Nov 9, 2012
    Had the E-M5 II, now have an E-M10 III (about this one: if you are not interested in 4K video, get the E-M10 II), and the posters above said almost all that needed. Only one thing that was not said is that the E-M5 II have the 1-2 switch that allows to have 2 completely different personal settings - but since your use is long exposure in a tripod, it is not relevant.

    If you don't need Hi-res shots or weather sealing, go for the E-M10 II.
     
    • Like Like x 2
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