EM10II(or III) vs. EM5II vs. nothing

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I don't spend hours looking at the periphery of the picture for softness, or taking pictures in the rain. If it rains ,I slip the camera under my coat. Since I don't have perfect vision I don't count the pixels on the screen and howl in agony if it is not 15mp per Cm.
Is it a "I just take pictures, I don't pixel peep as you losers" kind of post?
However, I don't see what all this has to do with what is criticized on the EM10.3.

The point of having a customizable camera (with advanced settings) is to be quickly ready to take the shots you want.
It's one of the things Olympus have been very good at in the past: you could adapt the camera to your shooting needs, and not the contrary.
 
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No. .I was just saying why I accepted the camera for what it is .Some people get so emotional about certain features of cameras to a ludicrous extent. It is a free market and they are not forced to purchase any camera. I just see so much negativity every time a new camera comes out. To me the most common problems are over complexity. At times you have to hit several buttons in quick sequence ,which seems to vary each time you use it. Others complain about plastic vs metal. Grip too big or two small, weather sealing and other things that have no bearing on picture taking.
 

ac12

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No. .I was just saying why I accepted the camera for what it is .Some people get so emotional about certain features of cameras to a ludicrous extent. It is a free market and they are not forced to purchase any camera. I just see so much negativity every time a new camera comes out. To me the most common problems are over complexity. At times you have to hit several buttons in quick sequence ,which seems to vary each time you use it. Others complain about plastic vs metal. Grip too big or two small, weather sealing and other things that have no bearing on picture taking.
I agree half-way with you.

As you said over complexity, makes it difficult to quickly and easily use the camera.
But, IMHO, that also comes from not being brought up with that gear, or not putting in the time to learn it.​
I had to have one of my student teach me how to use the camera on the iPhone. She said with astonishment "You don't know how to use the camera?" For them, it is a way of life.​
I was brought up with MANUAL film cameras, I had to learn the digital stuff, and I still have a LOT more to learn.​
And ergronomics DO matter.

Example1. My first system is Nikon. I borrowed a Sigma 17-50/2.8 to shoot a volleyball game. The Sigma zoom ring turns in the OPPOSITE direction from the Nikon zoom ring. Because I zoom with muscle memory, I kept turning the zoom ring in the WRONG direction; zooming in rather than out, and missing shots. After 15-20 minutes of that confusion :confused: , in frustration, I gave up and put the camera+lens away. REJECT.
Yes I know, Olympus lenses zoom in the opposite direction from Nikon. However, in this case, this is a system switch from Nikon to Olympus. So when I use the Olympus to shoot sports, I ONLY use Olympus lenses. Not where I use the conflicting gear along side each other, Nikon and Sigma lenses.​

Example2. My EM10, while a great camera is a bit small, for me, and I have relatively small hands. Working the controls on the back requires deliberate effort, because the controls a just a bit small/close together, unlike the controls on the EM1. But in this case, the camera DOES what I want it to do, so I accept the smallish controls. The ergronomics in this case was a minor irritation, not one so bad to cause a "reject," like the Nikon and Sigma zooms.

Example3. As for the grip on the EM10 being too small, I just use a screw on grip on my mk2, problem solved. And if I want small/compact, I simply unscrew the grip, problem solved. In a way, this gives me the best of both worlds, I can choose the camera configuration that I want.

As for Weather Sealing. If you shoot in bad weather, you REALLY WANT/NEED it. I use a camera "raincoat" on my Nikon, and that is a real hassle to use. I would much rather have a system that I can shoot in the rain without the camera raincoat.
One simple issue is to just put away the Nikon, I have to take the raincoat off the camera. Uh, not in the RAIN. So I have to stuff the camera with the raincoat on, into a large plastic bag, and do it so the water won't run into the camera. Then when I get home, where it is dry, I can then take the raincoat off the camera.​
So, IF you NEED weather sealing, you get the model that IS weather sealed, and don't get the one that is not.

But in the end, as you said, you accept or reject the camera, for what it is. You vote with your $$$$.
Bitching and moaning will not make the camera change.
Though the feedback may get back to Olympus, for future cameras/lenses.
 

ac12

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No. .I was just saying why I accepted the camera for what it is .Some people get so emotional about certain features of cameras to a ludicrous extent. It is a free market and they are not forced to purchase any camera. I just see so much negativity every time a new camera comes out.
This statement I completely agree.
The issue is that people build up an expectation/desire of what they want. Even if some of those expectations/desires are totally unrealistic.
And when those expectations are not met, some become very negative. As if the company HAD TO meet their expectations.

The same complaint applies to lenses.
People have complained about the 12-200, seemingly expecting PRO level optical quality from a non-pro lens. That is NOT a pro level lens, and has a huge 1:17 zoom ratio.
And look at all the complaints about the new 12-45/4, where personal expectations were not met.
Someone wants a shorter/smaller 12-35, someone else wants a longer 12-60. Both expectations CANNOT be met by the one lens.​
Someone wants compact over IQ, someone else does NOT want to sacrifice IQ for small size. Again, someones expectation will not be met.​

One very common problem, is people are CHEAP.
Example the people want EM5 functionality for EM10 price, just as people want EM1X functionality for EM5 price, and people wanted beyond EM1X functionality in the EM1-mk3.
As technology evolves, things naturally move down model.
But the expectation of some people is everything NOW, for CHEAP.
 
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No. .I was just saying why I accepted the camera for what it is .Some people get so emotional about certain features of cameras to a ludicrous extent.
The thing, Olympus have attracted a lot of customers like me because their cameras were highly customizable.
That's one of the main reasons I went m43.
That camera was much better than the competition in this regard.
For instance, being able to replace the useless mode positions (SCN, ART etc...) to something I'd use, was one thing I always wanted since I have a digital camera.
They completely changed the philosophy of the E-M10 III, removing all that.
So, yes, some users upgrading from E-M10 1 or 2 and discovering what the E-M10.3 got emotional...

That's not a question of complexity. A company should be able to make something easy to use, yet with advanced features for the ones who want more.
Introducing a silent mode than you can't use in most modes (PASM for instance), that's not making things simple, that's just bad interface design.

The choice made by Oly was more like: we're deliberately making this camera useless for some of our current E-M10 users, to force them to upgrade to the E-M5 line.

Now they also dumbed down the E-M5 line a little (not to much, fortunately).
 
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It is admirable that you study and learn so many of the detailed operations of the cameras. I am a sucker for the latest and greatest, and use several brands such as Panasonic, Olympus and Canon.
I have fun learning the new features ,but probably don't masters each one. Progress seems to be evolutionary, and does not always square with the hype. But progress is real . For instance Oly has the most spectacular IS now . Canon is now introducing AI eye detection ,which is quite remarkable. I have about given up on Panasonic ,but love and will keep the G-9 . What we have available today is great, but some areas may be reaching technological maturity. Too much demanding complaining can get tiring.
 
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It is admirable that you study and learn so many of the detailed operations of the cameras.
I just want the functions I'm going to use to be available quickly and easily, so I can use the camera efficiently.
For me the E-M10 III makes a lot of things that are useless to me available easily and hides (or makes impossible to use) some things I care about.

For instance Oly has the most spectacular IS now .
I can't say, I've always use Olympus IBIS (on my previous cameras I only had OIS).
I like it, but it doesn't help much as soon as your taking pictures of moving subjects (as people).
I'm glad it's there is one because I get movement blur very easily without IS, but I won't list it in my top 3 Olympus features :)

What we have available today is great, but some areas may be reaching technological maturity. Too much demanding complaining can get tiring.
What's problematic in the case of the EM-10, is that on some aspects the v2 is largely superior to v3.
So it's not about maturity, it's about regression.
If someday if I can get a very good price on a E-M10 II, I may buy it... but I'd still prefer my v1 version to the v3.
 

pigiron

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I have an original EM10. It seems to perform fine still.
Your original 3-axis EM-10 is a great camera that you will get peanut shells for if you sell it. Better to keep it as a backup or snapshot camera with one lens affixed to it and just buy a new camera with all the bells and whistles you might desire.

Or better yet get a nice lens at a focal length that you currently don't have and keep shooting with your OM-10.
 
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Your original 3-axis EM-10 is a great camera that you will get peanut shells for if you sell it. Better to keep it as a backup or snapshot camera with one lens affixed to it and just buy a new camera with all the bells and whistles you might desire.
If going in that direction, taking another E-M10 .2 .3 or an E-M5.3 has the advantage of keeping the same batteries.

Regarding your advice, I may do this with my good old E-M10... for instance with the 17 f/1.8. A very nice compact combo (and the 17 does't need 20 Mpix :) ).
 
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