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E-pl2 question..

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by Exposed, Aug 17, 2013.

  1. Exposed

    Exposed Mu-43 Regular

    136
    Apr 13, 2011
    Central Washington State
    Randy dawson
    So I have been using my e-pl2 for about 3 years now and have been very happy with it. I started to shoot nighttime photos, lighting and such and am not sure about it now. Take alook at this photo and give me your thoughts. This was shot at 200 ISO at 6 seconds. I see loads of noise, or what I think is noise. I can reduce it via lightroom, but am thinking, if I upgrade to say the E-p5 or E-pl5, would I get a better RAW file to work with. I love the size of the pen's and I have the evf-2 so I am set in that area. Or..... would new lens give me a better file....???

    So many questions going on in my head right now.....

    Randy

    Here is the photo, no noise reduction, a little exposure help.

    722.JPG
     
  2. dougjgreen

    dougjgreen Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 5, 2013
    San Diego
    Doug Green
    I see a nice photo. The subject matter is much more significant than the noise.

    It's like grain in film. If the photo was good enough, the grain wasn't an issue. The fact is, digital sensors produce noise during long time exposures.
     
  3. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    Do you have long exposure noise reduction turned off? That is kind of a lot of noise for a nighttime exposure, my GF3 gave me some nice buttery night shots but they would definitely have looked worse with long exposure nr off.
     
  4. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Yes, Noise Reduction needs to be turned to On or Auto. I would just leave it on Auto, as that will only turn it on for exposures of 1 second or longer. There's no need for it to be on any other time. "Noise Reduction" is not a noise filter on Olympus cameras, but rather applies a Dark Frame Subtraction for long exposures. After a long exposure it should take your camera a long time to process the image, as long as it took to actually take it. That is the camera applying Dark Frame Subtraction. A tiny hassle, but it really works!
     
  5. Larry H-L

    Larry H-L Mu-43 Regular

    33
    Aug 6, 2013
    Ohio, USA
    Larry
    The reason you are seeing more noise here, in this night-time picture, is because of two things.

    1: Long exposure time, almost always adds noise.

    2: Large areas of the image are dark, also know as:
    under-exposed. This often happens in night scenes, the brighter areas of the image are more properly exposed, and the dark areas are under-exposed and show more noise.

    The photo is really nice, don't worry about a little noise.
     
  6. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Agreed in theory, except that a 6 second exposure on an E-PL2 should simply not show that kind of noise. :) 6 seconds is not that long, and with Dark Frame Subtraction at ISO200 the noise should not be even visible like that.

    Here's an example of a 30 second exposure on the E-PL2:

    420-3_web.

    And here's a 30 second exposure on the E-PM1:

    truck_painting1_web.

    Both images show large dark areas with lighter subjects and MUCH longer exposures than 6 seconds.
     
  7. Exposed

    Exposed Mu-43 Regular

    136
    Apr 13, 2011
    Central Washington State
    Randy dawson
    Thank you for all the comments. I did not have noise reduction turned on, so I put it to auto. I may go out tonight and try a few shots.

    Again, thank you!!!

    Randy
     
  8. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Good luck, Randy! :D That should do it for you. You'll have to wait a while after each shot before you can shoot again (ie, you'll have to wait an additional ~6 seconds to process a 6 second exposure), but the photos will come out fine.
     
  9. drd1135

    drd1135 Zen Snapshooter

    Mar 17, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Steve
    Ned, what are those green lights?
     
  10. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    That should take care of this type of noise. Your camera probably has two types of noise reduction you can set (if it's like my Panasonic); regular and long exposure nr. I personally avoid regular noise reduction on my camera, I feel it gets rid of acceptable grain and replaces it with unacceptable blotchy smooth areas of detail loss. But the long exposure type is indispensable.