1. Reminder: Please use our affiliate links for holiday shopping!

E-P5 sensor debris

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by durandh, Apr 20, 2015.

  1. durandh

    durandh New to Mu-43

    4
    Mar 12, 2013
    o
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2016
  2. HarryS

    HarryS Mu-43 Top Veteran

    919
    Jun 23, 2012
    Midwest, USA
    I think the EP5 has the same 5 way IBIS as my EM5. When I power up my EM5, there is no slap, just a soft snick. There is a much louder slap on power down. That's the sensor going into a parking position. It can still move though, which is why a lot of owners fear to wet clean it at home.

    Do you have a puff blower? I finally bought one of those Giotto's rocket shaped blowers. It can knock out some dust. My grand kid would steal it if she could reach it.
     
  3. RichardB

    RichardB Snapshooter

    442
    Nov 19, 2012
    Maryland, US
    Richard
    Like HarryS, I notice a gentle movement when I turn on my camera (E-P5), and a more definite movement when I turn it off. If I remove the lens, I can see the sensor move when I turn the camera on or off.

    Contrary to what Olympus will tell you, I believe that you can clean the sensor yourself if you have reasonably steady hands and work with care. Try a squeeze blower first. (I use the rocket.) If that fails, steel your nerves and try a wet cleaning with a #2 sensor swab and Eclipse cleaner. There are videos showing proper technique on photosol.com. I had to do this for a PEN that had been left open and gotten grunge on the sensor. The blower didn't clean it, but two damp swabs did the job.

    However, before you clean the sensor, check your lens. It seems to me that you would see sensor dust in your images regardless of lens aperture. The fact that you see it only at narrow apertures suggests that you are really seeing something on or in your lens. If it's dust or dirt on an outer surface, the rocket blower or a wet cleaning with Pec Pads and Eclipse should fix it.
     
  4. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    I've wet-cleaned the sensor in my E-M5 and E-M1 several times without mishap. I've done it with the camera turned off (so no fighting the IBIS) and I'm careful not to apply too much pressure.
     
  5. durandh

    durandh New to Mu-43

    4
    Mar 12, 2013
    p
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2016
  6. RichardB

    RichardB Snapshooter

    442
    Nov 19, 2012
    Maryland, US
    Richard
    What you heard makes sense. I'd never switched the camera on or off without a lens in place before yesterday. I don't see any dust on the sensor now so maybe I was just lucky. In general I try to keep the sensor covered all the time.
     
  7. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
  8. HarryS

    HarryS Mu-43 Top Veteran

    919
    Jun 23, 2012
    Midwest, USA
    When you rub a balloon on your wool sweater and stick it on the wall to impress a little kid, I believe there are tens of thousands of volts generated. The sensor power supply is probably 3 volts. That's not going to attract any dust.

    It is wise not to leave the camera sit w/o a lens, although I often do that, messing around with old lenses and adapters at my desk. It's probably no worse than pulling a body cap out of a camera bag. I have seen some particles laying on the cover glass. If holding the camera upside down and powering it up to activate the dust shaker doesn't work, then I look for my Giotto Rocket Blower. In the worst case, I've done a wet clean.
     
  9. eteless

    eteless Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2014
    I believe the SSWF actually generates a charge, it's a little plastic/glass/something sort of surround around the sensor (you can't see it unless you take the camera apart) which is covered in an adhesive to make dust stick to it (I can't remember who mentioned it however with wet cleaning you need to make sure the solvent doesn't get to it or it can damage the filter which stops dust sticking to it... meaning you need to clean the sensor more which makes the filter less effective...), it has a little piezo thing to vibrate it and a wire for which I have absolutely no clue the purpose (my first thought was grounding it, however that would discharge any charge... so maybe it's the reverse and actually charges it instead? I don't know the complexities behind how the system works).
     
  10. HarryS

    HarryS Mu-43 Top Veteran

    919
    Jun 23, 2012
    Midwest, USA
    The SSWF incorporates a piece of glass over the top of sensor assembly. It's attached at one end to a piezo crystal, which is a piece of ceramic with electrodes. Apply a voltage and the ceramic changes size. Take it away and it goes back to its normal size. Do this fast enough and it vibrates fast enough to shake the dust off the glass. The sensor itself is not shaken.

    The Olympus DSLR's did have a piece of sticky tape on the floor under the mirror to catch dust. I don't think there's enough room in a m43 camera.