E-M5 Mk.2 - What is better for battery life?

connloyalist

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Apologies if this has been asked before.

Yesterday I was in the zoo walking around, and I kept turning my camera (E-M5 Mk.2) on and off between exhibits to conserve the battery. Then halfway through I thought it might be better to leave the camera on and let it go to sleep after 1 minute, since the "boot sequence" when you turn it on might use more power than the one minute of idle time before it goes to sleep (as well as saving some wear and tear).

Does anybody have any knowledge or thoughts about this?

Regards, C.
 
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I turn mine off a lot because it takes it longer to wake up than boot up. Sometimes I forget to turn it off,which is of no great consequence. In fact some cameras are so balky it is faster to just turn it off and than make it reboot. This is just from memory. I don't measure this with a stopwatch. I can't remember if some cameras behave differently than others or if specific settings on different cameras make a huge difference. I do not see any large downside to turning the camera off. Then the batteries will last for months.
 

mauve

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IMHO, to save battery life the best is to use the energy saving setting. Warning, it's a bit tricky to engage, you need to set the parameter and then switch to EVF. It had a poor wake up time with the earliest firmwares, and gained a bad reputation as a consequence, but this was addressed in the latest iterations of the software, and now it really extends shooting time while being reasonably snappy.
M.
 

AussiePhil

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The rarely discussed elephant in the room with this is the ultrasonic dust cleaning of the sensor, this runs every single time you turn the power on via the switch... it does NOT run from wake up according to the manuals in general.

quote from an em1 manual
Since dust reduction is activated every time the camera’s power is turned on, the camera should be held upright for the dust reduction function to be effective.

Now that simple sentence covers a couple of things. turning the power on whilst moving the camera up to the eye may actually not be a good idea from a sensor cleaning perspective and the camera will use a level of power to do this work.

The power used may be less or greater than the power used just letting the camera go to sleep but the time taken to wake from sleep should be fractional quicker as the sensor clean doesn't run......

Either way it's likely more effective just to let the camera go to sleep and be aware of the time set for power down in that sleep setup as after that time expires you need to toggle power off/on.
 

Acraftman

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I have accepted that fact that spare battery's are a must and just by nature if I think I won't be using the camera within the next 10 minutes will turn mine off but will just let it sleep or half press the shutter to keep it awake event shooting keeping the display screen closed helps with battery life in a tight situation .
 

ac12

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IMHO, the power on/off switch on the Olympus is put in a DUMB position, on the left deck.
This was a dumb retro carryover of the power switch of the OM1 film camera.
The issue is that it requires a separate hand movement to turn on/off.
As a result I normally just leave the power ON, unless I am changing lenses.

Modern ergonomics was ignored.
Heck even old ergonomics was ignored. The power switch on my 1970s era SLR was under my thumb, on the film advance lever, easy and fast to use.

Carrying spare batteries (note the plural) is SOP with a mirrorless camera.
In continuous ON state, the battery in my EM1-mk1, running IBIS, will last about 4 hours. On vacation, the battery needed to be changed at approx 11am and 4pm, with enough regularity that could predict the battery change.

OK, to your question.
For short between shot times, I would use the sleep function.
Just make sure you learn how it works, and practice with it, so you are not confused when you use it in the field.

Then when you are not going to use the camera for 30 minutes or more, then turn if OFF.
 

Replytoken

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IMHO, the power on/off switch on the Olympus is put in a DUMB position, on the left deck.
This was a dumb retro carryover of the power switch of the OM1 film camera.
The issue is that it requires a separate hand movement to turn on/off.
The only thing I found worse than the E-M1 was the switch on the E-M5. That was a total botch IMHO. My favorite design is what Nikon uses on its modern bodies. It is a collar around the shutter and can be flicked on by your shutter finger as you bring the camera up to shoot.

--Ken
 

ac12

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The only thing I found worse than the E-M1 was the switch on the E-M5. That was a total botch IMHO. My favorite design is what Nikon uses on its modern bodies. It is a collar around the shutter and can be flicked on by your shutter finger as you bring the camera up to shoot.

--Ken
Oh there was something worse.
On the Minolta ST-101, the power switch was a flat dial on the bottom of the camera.
You put your thumb against the flat dial, pushed (just for grip), then turned your hand to rotate the dial.
It was such a PiA to use that my friend would turn it on before a shoot, and turn it off AFTER the shoot, however long that shoot lasted. If it was a football game, it would be 2 hours later.

Agree about the Nikon power switch around the shutter button. :thumbup:
 
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AussiePhil

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The only thing I found worse than the E-M1 was the switch on the E-M5. That was a total botch IMHO. My favorite design is what Nikon uses on its modern bodies. It is a collar around the shutter and can be flicked on by your shutter finger as you bring the camera up to shoot.
--Ken
I must be in a minority but I actually like the switch on the left but for me it was about what i got used to from my film days with a Canon T70 that had the switch on the left side and as a slide switch with a lock button it was also likely harder to use.
The whole concept of turning the camera off between images is a foreign concept even after near 20 years of digital
 

Replytoken

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I must be in a minority but I actually like the switch on the left but for me it was about what i got used to from my film days with a Canon T70 that had the switch on the left side and as a slide switch with a lock button it was also likely harder to use.
The whole concept of turning the camera off between images is a foreign concept even after near 20 years of digital
I can tolerate the E-M1, but if you have ever tried the Nikon shutter collar switch, you can understand why it is such a great design IMHO. And I guess the reason I got used to turning the E-M1 switch was from turning the camera off and on to save power. It is now so ingrained that I tend to do it with the Nikon bodies as well, and I know a few folks just turn them on and leave them on all day when in use. Habits die hard.

--Ken
 

gwydionjhr

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IMHO, to save battery life the best is to use the energy saving setting. Warning, it's a bit tricky to engage, you need to set the parameter and then switch to EVF. It had a poor wake up time with the earliest firmwares, and gained a bad reputation as a consequence, but this was addressed in the latest iterations of the software, and now it really extends shooting time while being reasonably snappy.
M.
I recently read (don't recall where) that the EVF actually uses more power than the rear screen. As someone who rarely uses the rear screen, I as taken aback a bit when I read it.


The only thing I found worse than the E-M1 was the switch on the E-M5. That was a total botch IMHO. My favorite design is what Nikon uses on its modern bodies. It is a collar around the shutter and can be flicked on by your shutter finger as you bring the camera up to shoot.

--Ken
Like on the G9?
 

retiredfromlife

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I recently read (don't recall where) that the EVF actually uses more power than the rear screen. As someone who rarely uses the rear screen, I as taken aback a bit when I read it.
Yes this has come up a few times recently, after hearing that I used Rob Trek's guide for setting up sleep mode as it not just as simple as just setting sleep time.
 

connloyalist

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Personally I am fine with the position of the on-off switch on the E-M5 II. When I know I won't be using my camera for an extended period of time I do always turn it off. It's the situation where I know I will need it again 10 minutes from now.

Yes, I too was surprised to hear the EVF requires more power than the rear screen. I usually have the rear screen folded inwards and only use it when I have to dig it into the menu system for something or to review my pictures.

I wasn't aware that there is a dust reduction cycle every time you turn the camera on and that it needs to be held upright for that to be effective. I will remember that.

I pretty much always carry my spare battery because I know from experience that I will run out at some point. I use my E-M5 II with the HLD-8G grip (that's the one without the battery compartment) to improve ergonomics with adapted lenses. The problem is that you have to take it off to replace the battery. I wish they had designed it in such a way that it didn't block the battery compartment.

Regards, C.
 

mauve

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I recently read (don't recall where) that the EVF actually uses more power than the rear screen. As someone who rarely uses the rear screen, I as taken aback a bit when I read it.
This is true but the purpose is only to engage "energy saving" mode (quick sleep in Olympus parlance). Basically, in that mode, when your eye leaves the evf for more than 3 seconds, the camera goes into idle. A tap on the shutter button wakes it up again when needed. See : Setting quick sleep mode (it's for the E-M1 mk II, but it applies to the E-M5 mk II mutatis mutandis).
M.
 

mauve

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(...) I use my E-M5 II with the HLD-8G grip (that's the one without the battery compartment) to improve ergonomics with adapted lenses. The problem is that you have to take it off to replace the battery. I wish they had designed it in such a way that it didn't block the battery compartment.
You can screw a HLD-6P battery holder under it, it's compatible.
M.
 

connloyalist

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The problem for me with the HLD-6P is that it is too bulky and adds too much weight. So I make do with taking the HLD-8G off every time I change the battery. It's a compromise I am willing to make.

On a related subject (kinda sorta), I wonder how much power is saved by using adapted lenses where the camera doesn't have to drive the focusing motor. On the other hand I suspect (but don't know) that focusing the lens is one of the less power intensive components of the camera.

Regards, C.
 

Bushboy

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I haven’t timed the “on time” I get from mine, but it isn’t very long. I suspect about an hour, maybe a bit longer, before the warning blinkie lights up. It is only a tiny battery really.
I have noticed on a cold day, the camera gets nice and warm. I guess it’s just all those 0’s and 1’s getters processed into pretty pictures.
2 batteries is all I got, but I would certainly like a couple more.
I turn mine off soon as I taken the pic, I like the switch. I’m kind of pleased I’m not left handed though...
 

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